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NYPL RESEARCH LIBRARIES 



3 3433 08191947 8 



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WOLFE'S HISTORY 



OF 



CLINTON COUNTY 

IOWA 



P. B. WOLFE, Editor-in-Chief 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME II 



B. F. BOWEN & COMPANY 

INDIANAPOLIS. INDIANA 

191! 



THE .NEW YORK 

3375G0B 

ASTOn, LHNOX A.ND 

TILDEN rj:Nn.\T10\S 

B VJIO L 



CONTENTS 



CHAi'TKi: I IOWA AS A 'iKKKIJOl,' V AM) S'lATr, 25 

The Louisiana Purchase -Kai-ly Kxidorations— Discovered by DeSoto — 
LeCaron — Indi.nia 'I'ci riii.ry Oi-iranizotl — Otiicr Tci ritiirial Divisions — Iowa 
Territory— A'arious Cessi<jiis of the Territory —Kenioval (jf I he Indians— First 
Permanent Settlement — First Comities ( "re ited— Admissiun nf Die State -Clin- 
ton < 'ounty Erected. 

CilAPTI'.It II— GF0(;KA1'II[CAI., TOPOiilJAPlIUAL AND <;i:M:KAi, .XA'irUAL 

FFATUKES 29 

(;enliii,'y (if Clinton County — Its Arei — Dimensions — Toi)ograi>hy — Mississippi 
Lowlands — Goose Lake Channel — Drainage— I'reslacial Features — StratiKrajiliy 
— General Kelation of Strata — Fuderlyin-.' Formations — The Old Wells in the 
City of ("linton- Williiim Pitch Well— 'Che DeWitt Well— The Silurian System 
— The Xiairara Limestone — Description liy TownsliiiJS — The Pleistocene System 
— .MetiMU'olnLTv — An luti'rest in;; Talile — (ire.itt'st Snow and U.-iin Yeirs. 

CHAPTER III— 0U(;AM/AT1(>.\ OF THE COFXTY 41 

Territorial Enactment — Camanche Desijin a ted County Seat — The First Com- 
missioners — First (Jrand Jurors — First County Otticers — Layi^vu Out of Hiirh- 
ways — Territorial Koads Surveyed — Prairie Trails — Change of T(.\vnship Lines 
— County Governins: Power — Locating and lie-locating the County Seat — Legis- 
lative Enactment — K(>iiort of Commissioners. 

CHAP'l'KK IV— EAPLY SETTLEMENT OF CLLXTOX' COT'XTY___ 46 

Julian Dul)U(ine. the First Settlei' in Iowa — ciinton County Fiir<t Settled in 
isr>;^ — Eli.jah Puell. the Pioneer — Early Ilardshiiis — Conduct of the Indians — 
The Pearce Statements Concerning the Early Settlers — An Early Ferry — Old 
Settlers" Meeting— Autograph List of First Settlers — Old \Velton Colony — The 
Fngiisli Immigrant of is.lO — An Early Letter — Domestic Life — I,aliors and Dif- 
tiVnltit's of the Early Settlers. 

CHAPTER V— COUNTY COVERNMENT. PAST AXD PRESENT 02 

The Foundation — SelcL-tion of a County Seat— Court House History — County 
Seat Fixed at Camanche— Removeil to DeWitt — The Brick Court House at 
DeWitt — County Seat Removed to Clinton — Burlesque Petition — Lyons Takes 
a Hand Lyons and Clinton Fin:illy I'nJl Together — The Pre.sent Court House 
— Various County Jails — C(umty I'oor Farm — Items from the Commissioner 
and Judges' Records — Proceedin.gs of the Board of Suiiervisors- -Finances of 
the County — First Re])ort of Taxes — The C<iunty's Present Finaices — Salaries 
of County Otticers. 

CHAPTER VT— COrXTY. STATE AND XATIOXAL REPRESENTATION 79 

Representatives in Congress — State Senators— Territorial Representatives- 
State Rep.resentatives— Reeorders^-Sheriffs— Superintendents of Schools- 
County Auditors— County Judges— School Fund Commissioners— Drainage 
Comnnssioners— District Attorneys— County Attorneys— Clerks of the Court- 
Recorders and Treasurers — ^Treasurers— County Surveyors— Coroners — Board 



< ■ I * ' • 1 1 1 1 1 ^\ 

System. 



CON 1 K.N IS. 
I ..iMiiiissidiuT.s — Cniiiiiy Supi-rvisors — Supervisors rndcv I'rcseiit 



('II.M'IKK \ II -MlI.rrAKV IIISTOKV oF THK (HIUNTY 89 

Koiu-estMitiHl in the -Mc.xiciii W;ir— The Civil Wiir — Outluirst <if I'iitiiotisui — 
<;i<irioiis Kornnl— War .Meet iiifrs— Lyons Meetinir — Meetinj; and Knii.stmeuts at 
Clinton — The Clinton <"oiinty Ciianls — First Clinton County Soldier Killetl — 
The Ilawkeye lian^iers-Illaek TMunie Itnn^'ers — Conijiany A. Kii;liTh Itednient 
t'omiKiny A, FifletMitli Kei-'inient — Lion Coniiiany of Clinton County — Coni- 
pany F. Sixtw^ntli Iieiriment -The Clinton County Ke;:inient. the Twenty-si.xth 
— I'onipany .\. Sixth Cavalry — Soldiers Aid and Relief Soiieties — Women Earn- 
est and Fnthusiastlc — Roard of Supervisors .\ctive — Clinton County Soldiers — 
Misceilaneons Companies — Spanish-American War — rroclamation hy I'resident 
MfKinley — (Jeneral OnU'rs Issued — Inwa National (Juard Ordend to Move — 
Clinton County in the Forty-ninth I{eirinient — Odicers from Clinton County — 
Service by Company L. 

CIl.M'TKi: VIII- KAILKOADINt;. STKAMROATIXCJ AND TKANSrOKTATI()N__ 1()4 
Clinton I'ortunately Situateil — Its I )ependi>nce on the Itiver — Teanunsr and Ini- 
portaid IJnsiness — Its 1 Mlliculties — S,>vere Winter of lNr><;-7 — A Terrible K.xperi- 
ence — The Lyons Ferry-boat — Mail Routes — I'rovinoinl Conditions — A Serv- 
ice of rni-ertnin Remuneration — A Bath More Important than Mail — The 
Layini: Out of a Road — A Resolute Pioneer Woman — River Reminiseences — 
Primitive Craft — Railroads vs. Rivers — River Tonna.ire Diminishinjj; — I'ncertain 
Water Stages — Fnormous Lumber Transportation — -First and Last Boats Each 
Year — River Transjiortation Lines — The "Envoy" — Clinton County's First Rail- 
road — The <'alico Line— Chica;.io. I<i\va & Nebraska Railroad — Cedar Rapids & 
Miss^inri Coniiiany — The Clinton Railroad Bridge— The Chicaso, Milwaukee & 
St. Paul Railroad— The P.urlinirton R<inte— The Chicap). R<tck Island & PaciJie. 

CIIAI'IKI: l.\ A<;RIcri/J TRAL INTERESTS 126 

.\;rri<-idture and Lmnber the Base of Clintoii's Industrial Wealth — Pioneers In- 
vited by Fertile Soil and Rich Timber T/ind — But TJttle Conservation of 
.Natural Resoiu-ces— .\n Early Letter — Statistics in lS(;S-lS7.-)-i •»(>.") — County 
Fair ,\ssiiciitions — The r>oWit1 Fair — -Present Oflicers. 

< ilMli.lC \ i:i»lCA I lo.\ \1, l»iA LLol'.MKN'i (»F (LINTON COFNTY l.".-t 

Iowa Broad-minded in her Educational Ideas — Earliest Schools in Clinton 
County — The Lyons Schools — Early Opposition to Women Teachinir School — A 
Lyftns .School Relic — Township Sclnxds — Early Clinton Schools — Erection of 
Buildings I'lof. Ilcury S.-, bin— History of the Clinton Schools — Other Town 
Schools -.Mrs. Pureed Tells of the llaily Sclmols of Clinton County — Tlie Pres- 
ent-day Rural School-Present St;;ndinj; of Clinton County Schools — City and 
'{'own Schools — (Jrand Totals in Cou'.ity — Rise and F.ill of the Lyons Female 
( 'nllcire— Riverside Institnte-W.-nMbni;: CollejX(>. 

CHAPTER XI — REI,I<;iOFS HISTORY OF THE ('OINIY l.-.ii 

Early Settlers of True Christian I'ailli — First Preacher in the County — Father 
Emersoji — Conteniporary Preacher.s — The Methodist Episcopal Churches — The 
«'Iinf<in Churches I».'Witt M. 1'. Chnrch-Elwocl ("miani-he— Other :\rctlio- 



CON Til NTS. 

(list Churches — Catholic Churches of Clinton County -St. Iranaeus Parish — 
St. BonifMce— St. .M.irys -SI. 1 'a trick's— Sacred Heart— St. Joseph's— I )('\Vitt 
— St. Joseph's, Browns — St. Patrick's, Villa Nova — Petersville and Charlotte — 
St.. Mary's, Bryant — Toronto and T,o^st Nation — SS. I'liilii) and .James. Crand 
Mound — St. ColnnibkiU's — St. I'atrick's. Delniar — Weiton— Our Lidy ot 
Angel's Seminary — St. .Joseph's Hospital — Mt. St. Cl.iro Academy — Concerning 
the I'io- eer Pries! — I-'ather .Tom — Christian Churches — DeWitt Christian 
Church— Seventh-day Tiaptist Church— Baptist Cliurchos— DeAVitt Baptists — 
Clinton Baptist Church — Presl)ytorian Churches — Clinton I'rosbyterian Churcli 
— The I'nited Presbyterian Church — Elvira United Presbyterian Church — Con- 
gregational Church— Clinton — DeWitt — Episcopal Churches — Lyons Episcopal 
Church — Evau.selioMl T.uthernn Church — St. Paul's — The ChiU'cli at liuena 
Vi.'^ta — Grand Mound Congregation — Danish Evangelical Lutheran — Elvira 
Lutheran Church — Evangelical Association — Reformed Churches — Lost Nation 
Reformed Church — Wheatland Reformed Church — Clinton Universalist Church 
— Christian Science Chui'ch — The Spiritualists. 

CHAI'TKU Nil— SECIUOT AND BENEA'OLENT SOCIETIES IST 

Ancient Free and Accepted Masons — Western Star Lodge No. 100 — Emulation 
Lodge No. 2.55 — Order of the Eastern Star — Keystone Chapter No. 32 — Delta 
Council No. 23 — Knights Templar — Scottish Rite Masonry — Masonry at Lyons 
— DeWitt Masonic Bodies — Camauche Masons — Zeradatha I.od.ge No. 1S4 — 
Monitor Lodge No. 3.30 — Harbor Lodge No. 556 — Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows— Patriarchs Militant— Odd Fellows at Clinton— Eagle Lodge No. 8fi— 
Shekinnh Lodge No. 42 — Other Lodges — Knights of Pythias — Other Fraternal 
oVdors — Founding of the Two Woodcraft Orders. 

CHAI'TEIt NI II— BENCH AND BAR OF CLINTON COUNTY 203 

Early Lawyers in Clinton County — An Amusing Story — .ludgos of the District 
Coiirt — I'erso'.ial Mention — First Courts — Grand .Jurors — Bounds of the Dis- 
trict — First Case Entered — First Jury Trial— Early Law Practice — Some Early 
L;i wyors— Present Active Attorneys in tiie Comity— The First B:ir Convention 
in I own. 

CHAPTER XIV— THE MEDICAL PROFESSION 220 

Followers of Galen in the Vanguard of Civilization — Ra])id Advancement in the 
Science of Medicine — High Rank of Clinton County Physicians — First Doctors 
Here— Camanche— Lyons I'hysicians— Clinton Physicians— DeWitt — Clinton 
County Medicr.l Society— -List of Registered Physicians. 

CHAPTER XV— THE NEWSPAI'ERS OF THE COl NTV 23S 

Importance of the Local I'ress — Clinton County's First Paper. The Lyons Mir- 
ror — Still Published — Clinton and Lyons Newspnpers — Clinton Herald — Clinton 
Bee— Clinton Anzeiger — Tri-City Labor Voice— Clinton County Advertiser — The 
Merry War — Iowa Volkszeitun.g — DeWitt Newspapers— 01i.server—Cii ma uche 
Journalism — Calamus News]);ipfrs — Lost Nation Journalism — Wheatland News- 
p;iliors— Papers at Delmar^Charlotte Papers. 

CHAPTER NVl— ELK RIVER TOAA'TsSHIP 247 

One of the Six Original Townships — Early Settlers — Later Comers — Educa- 
tional — First School Strong Gt'i-uinii Eleuipnt — Early Alills—f 'rimes — Towns 



CONTENTS. 

of Elk Itiver Township— Alniont — lljiuutnwn — Aiulover — Teeds (irove — Elk 
Kiver .Tniii-tion. 

CIIAI'THU XVII I>KKI' ("KEEK TOWNSHIP — __ 253 

lis l!..iiii(l:iri('s— I>»M-iv.ition of N.inio— nosoription of Oooso T>ake — A Spec'tjicle 
(if I >:i//.Iiiii.' He.iiit.v — EmiI.v ScttloimMit — Notnhle Events — Goose Ljiko — The 
First rnstoffice — 4iic'irpiir:ition — Present Officers — Business Houses — Bx\vjint — 
I'l.ittinu'— E:iriy Mcirli.ints— I're.-eMt Business Interests. 

CHATTi:!; Will W A ri:KI«»KI> roWNSIlII* _: 259 

Ms Terrilniy— Streiins — First Settler — Aliiiiiihiiice of (Jsiine — The Air Line 
Bonni — First School — First Tavern — Charlotte — I'lattinir — Chnrches — Kural 
Itoiites I niur I Miration — Business and Professional I >ireciory — Browns — Peters- 
ville. 

rilAITEU XIX — BI.OO.MFIEI.I) TOWNSHIP 2*;.-, 

nr^ani/.ation — Early Settlers — Many Canadians — Township Orifiiually Tiinher- 
les.s — Pioneer Ainnsenients— Far From .Markets — Early Primitive ("'onditions — 
Early Churches — Horse Thieves — Del mar — Plattinj; — Railroads — First Mer- 
chants— Postmast«'rs — Doctors — lyodires— New Century Club Library — .News- 
papers — Incorporation of the Town — Mayoi-s — Waterworks- I'.usiness Dire/tory 
— r>elmar Produce Comjtany. 

CIIALTEI: X.\ — P.KIM »K FIELD T<>WNS11IP ^ 271 

l.oc.ition — Early History — Early Settlers Mostly Native-born Americans — Rail- 
road — El wood — Pl.ill iiiL'' I'irst Mrrcliants — Postollicc — LodflPS — Population — 
Busin«'ss Directory. 

CHAPTER XXI -SHARON TOWNSHIP 273 

<M-pinization of tin- Township —First Settlements — Swede bnrsians — German 
Dnnkards — Lost Nation — Origin of .Name — Plattiu}: of Town — Churches — 
.\ew.siijiper.s — Incorporation — Mayors — Electric Lights — Business Directory. 

CIIAPTEI: XXII — LIBERTY TOWNSHIP 277 

P.oimdary of the Township — Settled at an Early Date — The Pioneers — Itail- 
road — Toronto — Early .Mills^Early" .Merchants — Church — Postmasters — Lodiies 
— Present Business Interests — Incoriioration — Officers — Ftilities. 

rilAI'IKK XXIII P.EKLIN roWNSllIP :2S(l 

I'ornierly Includeil in Olive I'ownsliiii — First Election-^Boundaries of the 

Township — Early Settlers — No Town in the Township C 1 lOducational 

Facilities. 

< NAIIFK .\XI\ UELTON TOWNSHIP 281 

Boimdarie.s — Orjranization — Fertile Soil — Physical Chara<'teristics of the Land 
Early Settlers Scvenlh-ilay P.aptists — WeIlon--First Merchants — Doctors — 
Pres<'nt Business Men Incorpor.Mion IM'osent Oljiccrs — IKlo P.nsiness Di- 
rectory. 

CHAPTER XX\ W.\SIII.\(;TnN TnWNSlIll' :iS4 

Bonntlrry mi Oryani/atioii Surface — Settled at an Early Period — Prosperous 
Early Settlers — Catholic Clinnh Well i'nltivatcd Fainis No Tnwns or Vil- 
lajres. but Many Schools :ind ('bnrches. 



CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER XVr— CENTER TOWNSHIP L'^'fi 

r.nimd.ify .111(1 Oi i-'.iiiiziition — Siirf.icc — Settled iit ;in early Period — ProsixM'ous 
.\,i:riiiiltur;il ("oiiiimiiiity — The (".ilico Kailro.id — Hut Little Liti«alioii — Elvira 
— Plattins — Piistiiiasters — < 'Iniic lies — F'l-esent P.usiiiess Interests. 

ciiArriK \x\ II iiAMi'siiiKi: TowNsiiir 2.s'-) 

()r.ir;iniz;iti<i!i .niil I'iisl Klection — Early Settlement by (Jeruians and Irish — 

l'"iisl Settlers — (imd ScIiiupIs Xn 'ruwiis nr \'ill:iues. 

cHAi'TKi; xwiii sriii.xc \ai.i.i:y 'lowxsiiir u:iu 

I.i'st 'rdwiisiiiii Kniiiicl ill llie County— Its I5(uiml:iries— Settled at an ICjirly 
Date — \'alii;ilili' l\-n ms - K.iilw.iy Systems. 

CllAl'TKU XXIX LINCOLN ToWNSIlir 1>,)1 

Its Kreetlon by the Hoard of County Cuiiiiiiissioners — Boundary — Area — 

Srreiiiis— Xaiueil After the Martyr President — I'irst Lle-tioii. 

CHAl'Tint XXX CAMANCilK 'roW.XSIIll' 211:2 

One of the Original 'i'owiisliips — I ts I'.nuiularies Defined — Early Settlers — City 
of Canianche — An Interestini; History — Its Chaniiiiif; Situ;;tiirn — Ori;.'i'i of 
the Tnwi' — Dr. Georw I'eek — Survey of the T<iwii — The Camanche & Coimcil 
P.luffs Railroad — Crossing the Mi-ssissijipi — Cainauehe as the County Se;it — 
First Invents at Canianche — Incoriioral inn History — V\'harfmaster — Early lUisi- 
ness Interests of Canianche — Present I>usiii(>-;s Interests — Postotfice History — 
liurglars at Camanche. 

CHAPTER XXXI— EDEN TOWNSHIP 3(X) 

A Fine Section of Country — Its Situation — Railro:;d — Streinis — Pioneer Set- 
tlers — First vSchool — Murders — Low Moor — First Houses — Postofllce and Post- 
masters — The I'nder.sround Riilroad — Stni'niy .Tordan — First Merchants — 
Newspapers — Doctors — Fire of lOoT — Iiirnrperatiou — I'.usiiK'ss Directory — 
Ma lone. 

CHAPTER XXXII— DE WITT TOWNSHIP 3C5 

Organization and Roundaiy — N'aluahle Farm Lands a'.d Iniidoved Ilomt'ste ds 
— First Attempt at Settlement — Prominent Pioneers — Interesting Incidents — 
First Events — Town of DeW.itt — Location as County Seat — First House — First 

Log Court House — Population in 1844 — First Merchants, Lawyers and Physi- 
cians — Coming of Railroads — Churches — Pcstotfice Record — Library — Iowa As- 
sessment Mutual Insurance Comiiany — Clinton County .Agricultural Society — 
First Newspaper — iHcoriiorai ion -Mayors — Present Oflicers — Fraternal Organi- 
zations — Professional and Business Directory. 

CHAI'TKK NNN II I— ORANGE TOWNSHIP 318 

Area and Boundary— Early S(?ttlers— W. R. Barner's Account of the Towiishij) 
— (rrand Mound — Incorporation — Churches — Postoffice History — T'.usiiiess and 
Professional Directory — Past Mayors and Present Town Officers. 

CHAPTER NXXIV— OLIVE TOWNSHIP 322 

Organization — Original Boundaries — First White Settler — The Dutton Family 
— An Early Lawyer and Teacher — Boimes Trail — Ferry — Calamus PostofHoe— 
First Events in the 'rownshiit -.Tohn Robinson's Operations — Murder of Mrs. 



CONTENTS. 

lIstiRT Aljier — The Town of (".ilniuus — IiiciirpiuMliKii OtlicHis — rnslnffico — 
Trpsont I?nsiiu»ss K.-iftors — A Disjistroiis Fire. 

I ilAi ii.K .\.\X\ .■>i'i:i.\i, iiix K TOWNSIill' oli'-* 

Urifjin of .Nniue— Ur;;;iniz;itio:i — Streauis — Early Settlement — Town of Wlieat- 
Innd — Post office— Early Merchants — Serious Fires — Railroad — Incorporation 
History— Oflicers — War Koconl AV;ir rriccs — AVafi-r \V<ii-ks— Present Business 
Interests — Sliort Reminiscences. 

(•iiai'Ti:r xxxn 1 t.ank.s .\.\n i;a.\ki.\(; in the cointv 335 

iJanks a Necessity — The Fir.«<t Bank in Clinton County — First National Bank 
of Lyons — Lyons Saving's Bank — Iowa State Savings Bank — Clinton Bankinj: — 
Clinton Saviniis I'.ank — City National liank — Merchants National Bank — I'eo- 
pU's Trust and Savinjrs Bank — Wheatland — German Trust and Savings Bank — 
Exchaufie Bank .of Calamus — Farmers Savings Bank, Calamus— Citizens Sav- 
iufrs B.ank. Low Moor — Teeds Grove Savings Bank — Citizens Bank of Lost Na- 
tion — First National Bank. Lost Nation — Elwood Savings Bank — Farmers & 
Merchants Bank of Welton— First National Bank of DeWitt— Farmers & Citi- 
zens Savings Bank, DeWitt — DoWitt Siwings Bank — Chra'lotte Savings Bank — 
Farmers ;ind Merchants Savings Bank, Charlotte — Goose Lake Savings Btink — 
I'eoiilos SMvinirs Bank. Delmar — Peoples Savings Bank. (Jrand >found — P:!nic 
ofls.-.T. 

CHAI'TEK XXXVII— CLINTON AND LYONS ;',41> 

Situation of Clinton — Poi)nlation — First Town Platted Called X^ew York — Iowa 
Land Company — Original Plaiting — Additions to the Plat — Clinton's Forerun- 
ner — Municipal History of Clinton— First Council Meeting — Mayors Since In- 
corporation — Present City Officers — The City Parks — Fire Department — Police 
Dejiartment — Postollice History — Water Works — Gas Works— Streat Railways 
— Litigation .-nid Contents — Telephone P.usiuess — Public Libraries — (irand 
Army of the Republic— Ladies of the Grand Army — The Two High Bridges — 
Cemeteries — Young Men's Christian As.sociation — Hospitals — Clinton Industries 
—The I-umber Industry— Eai-ly Mills — Lamb & Sons — Young & Co. — Cliitrn 
Lnii!'"'i' '■" A[i<<ivv;ippi i;i\i'r InvLring Co. — "Mills Ojerated at Lyons — Gardi- 
ner. Batchelder & Welles— Da \ id .loyce — Curtis Bros. & Co. — Lyons — From 
IS.'il to 1S.~»7 — Ringwood — Lyons Incorporated — Postollice — IMiblic Library — 
Gr;ind .\rn:y of the Kei>nblic - Amiexvtion to Clintr-n — Defeat AckumvlcMlged. 

< HAl'lKK \NN\1I1 MISCELLANKOrS ITEMS OF INTEREST ;iS«> 

Village Plats of the County- -The Fuderground Railroad — Old Settlers' Meet- 
ing.s — Population of Cii'iton County — Saloons in Clinton C:un)ly— Torn. .does — 
M«'morable Ttunado of isuo— storm of lS7r.— Storm of ISDS— "Bigelow's Mint'' 
— Di'ys of Moundng — Death of President Garfield — Deitli of Pr«'sident McKin- 
ley — Pioneer Detectives — Hanging of Wancn — Hanging of Barger — Ilimr's 
Hanging. 

• IIAl 11:1: XNXIX— RE.MINISCENCES 428 

Whoatland Fifty Years Ago — Retrospection and Rennniscences — It Might Have 
I'lfrii -.\n Examjile in Patriotism — We Still Live A Kciinniscence of Earl.v 
Days — \dt(' on I'rohibitorv .\nicndment. 



HISTORICAL INDEX 



c 



Agatha Hospital. Clinton 371' 

Agricultural Interests 126 

Aid and Relief Societies 97 

Alger. :\Irs. Esther, Murder of 326 

Almont 250 

Ancient Free and Accepted :\Ia- 

sons 187 

Andover 251 

Area of Clinton County 29 

Attorneys, Present List of 217 

Auditors 82 

B 

Banks and Banking 335 

Baptist Churches 170 

Barger. Hanging of 426 

Barker, A. P 210 

Bench and Bar 203 

Benevolent Societies 187 

Berlin Township 280 

Bethel A. :\I. E. Church, Clinton 155 

Bigelow's ;Mint 413. 

Black Plume Rangers ' 93 

Bloomfield Township 265 

Board of County Commissioners 85 

Board of Supervisors 74 

Boat Statistics 115 

Bollinger, James W 210 

Booth. .John B 211 

Bounty for Soldiers 98 

Brannpn, William F 206 

Brick Court House at DeWitt 64 

Bridge, Clinton Railroad 124 

Brookfield Township 271 

Bryant 257 

Buell, Elijah 46 

Buena Vista Ev. Luth. Church 180 

Br.rlington Route 125 



Calamus 327 

Calamus M. E. Church 157 

Calamus Newspapers 244 

Calamus Postofiice 324 

Calico Line 121 

Camanche 293 

Camanche as the County Seat 295 

Camanche Baptist Church 170 

Camanche Ferry 52 

Camanche Journalism 244 

Camanche Masons 195 

Camanche M. E. Church 157 

Camanche Physicians 221 

Camanche Township 292 

Carnegie Library, Clinton 362 

Catholic Churches 158 

Cedar Rapids & Missouri River Line 122 

Census, 1834 27 

Center Township 287 

Change of Township Lines 43 

Charlotte 2G0 

Charlotte Papers 246 

Charlotte Savings Bank 345 

Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska Line 121 

Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Line 124 

Chicago Northwestern Railroad 123 

Ciuc^'iio. Rnck I.slir.ul .';: I'acifi? 12.5 

Christian Churches 16S 

Christin'i Science Church l.v.l 

Citizens Rank of Lost Ntition 04:! 

Citizens Saviuics Rank, Low Moor 342 

City and Town Schools 147 

City XMtiniKil B:inlc. Clinton SoH 

Civil War .S:> 

Clerks of the Court S4 

Clinton and Lyons .'540 

Cli'MdU Anzeigcr I'M 

Clinton Baptist Chnn-]i__ ._ 17:.* 

Clinton C;ii'no,!j:io T.ilu'.-n'v 'MI 



HISTORICAL IXDKX. 



Cliiitnii ('niictiTit's .!'■>''> 

Cliiitiiii ('liristi.-m Churcb K!"^ 

Clinton. City Tjirks 353 

Clinton Con;;rosatioii;i] ("iiun-li ITT 

Clitton County Advert is<>r -41 

Clinton County Afiriculturnl Associa- 
tion K>1 

Ciiiiluii Cniiiily. Arc;i of -!• 

Clintou County. K.irly Settleuient — 4i: 

Clinton County Cu.inls '.>! 

Clinton Coui'ty .Mcilical Society "Jii'.i 

Clinton Cfiunly < )rj;.inizeil 41 

Clinton County Ucsinient *.•"> 

Clinton County Soldiers '.lit 

Clinton County's First Itailroad l:j1 

Clinton Danish I'.v. T.ulli. Cliunli ISl 

Clinton Kiiis«-o|iaI Ciniiili ITS 

Clinton Kvanjieliral Association 1.S2 

Clinton Tire Department IVA 

T'linton. Kirst Claim at r>l 

Clinton tlis Worics '.\~}~ 

Clinton Herald 23S 

Clinton Ilnsiiitals 3T2 

Clinton Industries ?>72 

Clinton Lunilier Co :\~\\ 

Clintou. Mayors of oHi 

Clinton Metliodism 1.":! 

Clinton. Municipal History :'..'')1 

Clinton National Raidv 33S 

Clinton Newsjiapers 2'\^ 

Clinton riiysicians 21'! 

Clinton I'olice Department ;'."')4 

Clinton County. I'opulation of 80S 

Clinton Postoffice ."..V) 

Clinton rroshyterian Church 1T."> 

Clinton. Tresent City Officers M.VJ 

Clinton Public Libraries .",01 

Clinton Pailroad Hridfre 12 1 

Clinton S;ivint:s Paidc .",:!"i 

r'iiiilK'i .^diMol Snp(>rintendents 141 

Cli'iton Schools. lOarly V',s 

Clinton Street P-iilways ."^HS 

Clinton 'rclcMhone Piusiness :5('iM 

Clinton riHvcrs-ilist Clnin-h IS) 

Clinton W'icr Works .•^-.c, 

Clinton W.'lls :•,:'. 

Coinndssioiier I'e''f>iiN 72 

Comndssloners. County S." 

rnnimissioners. DrainaRe S?, 



Commissioners. School-fund .S3 

Company A. Eighth Reg 94 

Company A. Fifteenth Keg !)4 

Company A. Sixteenth Ileg !)4 

Comi)any A. Sixth Cavalry !)7 

Company F. Sixteenth Keg J>4 

Company L. Forty-ni'ith Keg l(t2 

Congregational Churches 1T<! 

Congress, Kei)resentatives in T'.) 

Coroners s.~» 

County Attorneys 83 

County Commissioners 85 

County Finances 75 

County Governing Power 43 

Count.v (iovernmeut, I'a.st and Pres- 
ent (12 

Count.v .Tails 70 

Count.v Judges ,s:5 

County Officers. First 41 

Count.v Organized 41 

County Poor I'ann 71 

County Seat at Camanche 2'..". 

Comit.v Seit Eleotioi r>7 

Cotmty Seat Located 43 

County Seat Ke-Locnted 43 

Count.v Seat Kemoved to Clinton (>5 

County Supervis(u-s si! 

Count.v Surveyors S4 

County Treasurers 84 

Court House lllstoiy . <;2 

Court House. Present <>!> 

Crossing the Mississippi 295 

Curtis Bros. & Co 382 

D 

Days of Mourning 414 

Death of President Cnrfield 415 

Death of President IMcKinley 41 S 

Deei) Creek Township 25:', 

Delmar 2f«7 

Delmar M. E. Church ir,s 

Delmar Newsi>aiiers 24() 

DeSoto, Fernando 25 

DeWitt as the Seat of .Justice 311 

DeWitt Rnptist Church 171 

DeWitt Ciiristian Chni-i-h KV.) 

DeWitt Congregational ('linrcli 177 

DeWitt F.iir i:'.l 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



DeWilt. lucdi-poi-iitHiii of Ml t 

DeWitt Masonry I'.M 

DeWitt, Mayors of 31.". 

DeWitt M. K. Church 1". 

DeWitt Named 7;; 

DeWitt Observer 248 

DeWitt I'hysicians '22(> 

DeWitt, roi'iUation in 1S44 811i 

DeWitt I'ostortice Ket-onl 'SV.i 

DeWitt Public Library 818 

DeWitt Savings Bank 844 

DeWitt, Town of 31(J 

DeWitt Township .305 

DeWitt U. P. Church 174 

DeWitt Well 34 

Diamond .To I^ine llti 

District Court. First Term 218 

District Court Judges 204 

Dillon, John F 205 

District Attorneys 83 

Domestic Life 59 

Drainage 32 

Drainage Commissioners .S8 

Drift Plains 31 

E 

Earliest Schools 134 

Early Clinton Schools 138 

Early Explorations 25 

Early Justice Courts 51 

Early Saw-Mills 377 

Early Settlement of Clinton County_ 46 

Eastern Star 18S 

Eden Township 300 

Educational Development 134 

Elijah Buell 46 

Elk River Township 247 

Elk River Township Schools 248 

Elk River Township Settlers 248 

Elvira 287 

Elvira Lutheran Church 182 

Elvira U. P. Church 174 

Elwood 271 

Elwood M. E. Church 1,^6 

Elwood Savings Bank .348 

Emerson, Rev. Oliver 1,50 

English Emigrant of 1850 50 

Episcopal Churches 178 



Evangelical Luthoian <liiuthes 17'.t 

Example in Patriotism 434 

Exchange Bank of Calamus .342 

F 

Fair Associations i:'>o 

Farm Statistics 12S 

Farmers and Merchants Bank, Wel- 
ton 843 

Farmers and Merchants Savings 
Bank. Charlotte 345 

Farmers Savings Bank, Calamus 342 

Father Emerson 1.50 

Ferry at Camanche 52 

Ferry Boat at Lyons loc, 

Finances of County 75 

Financial .Statement, 1009 77 

First Bank in County 3.35 

First Bar Convention in Iowa 217 

First Claim at Clinton 51 

First Clinton County Attorney 215 

First County Officers 41 

First Courts 213 

First Grand Jurors 41 

First Jury Trial 213 

First M. E. Church, Clinton 1.58 

First Minister in County 1.50 

First National Bank, DeWitt .344 

First National Bank, Lost Nation 848 

First National Bank, Lyons .330 

First Railroad 121 

First School Tax 73 

First Settler 40 

First Settlers .53 

Founding of Woodcraft Orders 201 

G 

Geographical Features 20 

Geological Description by Townships 34 

Geology of Clinton County 20 

German Trust and S.ivings Bank, 

Wheatland 341 

Goose Lake 250 

Goose Lake Channel ,32 

Goose Lake Savings B;ink 345 

Grand Army of the Republic 804 

Grand Jurors, First 41 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Cniiul .Mnmid i\1U 

(Jnind .Miiiiiiil Innnnnnel Church IM 

(Jnint. J.iiiK's l!os 

II 

Il.iwUi'.vc ICnii^rtTs 1)3 

H.iiiipsliin' Tnwiisliip 2S0 

Il.-iii^iiiU iif It.ir^rer 420 

Ilangiuj: of Iliiier 421! 

IIiin>:iii^ (if W.irren 421 

Iljiuntdwn 250 

n:i.vos. Wjilter I 208 

Hii-'li Hridfies 365 

Miner's Ilniifiinfr 420 

TInrso Tliipves 207 

Hoiisi'. A. J 210 

Ilnwit. Andrew 211 

I 

Independent Order of Odd Fellows 196 
Indiiins, Conduct of 4<j 

Indians lieuioved 27 

Inflated Values 260 

Iowa Land Company 340 

lowan l>rift I'lain 31 

Iowa State Savings Bank. Lyons 33S 

Iowa Territory 25 

Ifiwa \olkszeitunj< 242 

J 

Jackson, Douglas V 211 

Jails 7,, 

Jean. Kcv. Frederick C 107 

J<>y<e. David 381 

Judges 83 

Judges of the District Court 204 

Judges' Uecords 7-_> 

Justice Courts. Karly 51 

K 

Keokidv Nortlieni Line lit; 

Kiiiglits r.f rytliias 2(J0 

Knights Tcnijilar 1S<» 

L 

Ladies of the <;. A. K 365 

Land) & Sons ;;77 

Laying Ont of a IJoad lu'.i 



Leltingwell. A. J 200 

Lofliiigwcll, William K 2lo 

Lil>erty Township 270 

Lillrnlii 'rnwiisllip 291 

Lion Company 94 

Locating tlic Cdimty Seat 4;> 

Lost Nation 274 

Lost Nation Catholic Church 105 

Lost Nation Journalism 244 

Lost Nation Reformed Church 1S3 

Louisiana Purchase 25 

Lowlands. :Missi.ssippi 30 

Low Moor 302 

Low Moor M. E. Church 158 

Lmnher Industry 371; 

Lyons 383 

Lyons & Iowa Central Route 121 

Lyons, Annexation to Clinton 387 

Lyons Congregational Church 170 

Lyons Episcopal Church 178 

Lyons Evan. Luth. Church 17!) 

Lynns Female College 148 

Lyons Ferry Boat 100 

Lyons, Incorporation of 385 

Lyons, Mayors of 385 

Lyons M. E. Church 152 

Lyons Mirror 240 

Lyons Newspai)ers 2.3S 

Lyons Physicians 222 

Lyons Postoffice 380 

Lyons Presbyterian Church 172 

Lyons I'uhlic Library 380 

Lyons Savings Bank 337 

Lyons School Relic 137 

Lyons Schools 135 

Lyons Street Railways 358 

M 

Mail Routes 107 

M.ilono 3^4 

Markliam's Tavern 2OO 

Ma.sonic Order is7 

Masonry at Lyons 193 

.Modicil Profession 030 

Medical Society, Clinton County 220 

Meetings. War 91 

Merchants National Bank. Clinton___ .340 
Mercy Ilo.spital. Clinton .370 



IlISTOKRAL lM)i:X. 



.Mrtciinildtry •57 

.Mctlunlist i;|iiscu|(.il ( Miurclies 1.">12 

Mcxicin W.u- ' M> 

Mit.-lifll. Cill.crt C. It -'!»!» 

Milil.iiy History of County Mt 

Mills :it Lyons :{8(> 

.Miscclhincnns ('onmi.inils !)!) 

.Miscollanciins Items 3S9 

Mississijipi Discovered 26 

Mississijijii T.owl.iiuls 30 

Mississiiijii Kiver Logging Co 380 

Mt. St. Clare Aeadeniy 1G7 

Murder of Mrs. Alger 32G 

Murders in Kden Township 301 

Murray. Saniucl It 21o 

N 

Natural Features 29 

Newsimpers of the County 238 

New York 351 

Niagara Limestone 34 

Northern Steamboat Line 11(5 

O 

Odd Fellows IOC 

Oflicers. County, Sjilary 78 

Old Clinton Wells 33 

Older Drift Plain 31 

Old Settlers' Meetings 30fi 

Olive Township 323 

Olive Townsliip, First Events 324 

Orange Township 318 

Order of the Eastern Star 188 

Organization of the County 41 

Our Lady of Angels Seminary 160 

P 

Panic of 1857 346 

Past County Government 02 

Patriarchs Militant 106, 198 

I'eoples Savings P.ank, Delmar 345 

Peoples Savings Bank, Grand Mound 346 
Peoples Trust and Savings Bank, 

Clinton 340 

Periods of Iowa History 27 

Petersville 263 

Petersville Catholic Church 164 

Physicians. List of Registered 231 

Pioneer Detectives 419 



Plats of Towns and \illages 3S<.» 

Pleistocene .System 37 

Poor Farm 71 

Population of Clinton County 398 

Prt'sbyterian ('inn-clies 172 

Present Attorneys in County 217 

Present Couit Mouse (»9 

Present-day Itural School 144 

Press of Clinton County 238 

Proclamation of President McKin- 

ley 100 

Proliihitory Amendment, Vote on 442 

Pythian Order 2(M) 

R 

Itailroading 104 

Railroad, The First 121 

Railroads vs. Rivers 113 

Rain Statistics 40 

Itecorders 84 

Reformed Churches 183 

Registered I'hysicians 231 

Relatiim of Strata 33 

Relief Societies 97 

Religious History 150 

Reminiscence of Early Days 439 

Reminiscences 428 

Reminiscences of the River 111 

Removal of Indians 27 

Representatives 80 

Representatives in Congress 79 

Retrospection 430 

Richman. .Tacoh S 209 

Ringwood 385 

River Reminiscences 111 

Itiverside Institute 149 

River Traffic 118 

River Transportation Lines 116 

Robinson, John W. S 326 

Royal and Select .Masters 189 

Royal Arch Masons 188, 194 

Rural Schools, Present-day 144 

S 

Sacred Heart Church, Clinton 161 

St. Boniface Catholic Church 160 

St. Colnmbkiirs Church. Hughes 165 

St. Irenaeus Catholic Church, Clin- 
ton 159 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



St Josephs Church, DeWitt 162 

St. .T<is«>pli's Ilospitiil 167 

St. .Miiiy's Church. Hrviint 165 

St. .Mnry's Church. Clinton 160 

St. Patricks Church. Clinton 161 

St. r.itricks Cluircii. lU'lninr lOO 

St. r,itrick'.>* Cliurch. Vilhi Nova 164 

St. Paul's Kv. Luth. Church 180 

S.>*. l'hili|> and .Tanie.s Church, Grand 

•Mound — 16o 

Salary of County Officers 78 

Saloons in Clinton County 398 

School-fund Coniniissioners 83 

S<-ho(>I Statistics 148 

School Superintendents 82 

School Superintendents, Clinton 141 

School Tax "3 

Schools at Lyons 135 

Schools. City and Town 147 

Schools. Earliest 134 

Schools, Present Standing 14G 

Scottish Kite Ma.sonry 100 

Secret Societies 187 

Senators 79 

Settlement of Whites 27 

Seventh-I^ay Baittist Church 160 

Seven' Winter of 185G 105 

Sharon Town.ship 273 

Sheriffs 82 

Silurian System 34 

Snow Statistics 40 

Soldiers Aid and Helief Societies 07 

Soldiers Rounty OS 

Spanish-American War 100 

Sfiiritualists 1S5 

Si.rinu' Kock Township 320 

Spring N'alley Township 200 

State Representatives 80 

State Senators 79 

Statistics. School 14S 

Steainboating 104 

Storm of lS7r> 410 

Storm of 1808 412 

Stowr«. J. S 323 

Strata. Relation of 33 

Stratigrai)hy .33 

Superintendents Clinton Scliools 141 

Su[ierinfendents of School 82 

Supervisors SO 



Su])ervisors, Proceedings of 74 

Surveyors 84 

T 

Tax and Valuation 1877 76 

Tax Report, 1840 76 

Taxation. 1851 73 

Teed's (Jrove 251 

Teed's Grove Savings Bank 342 

Territorial liepresentatives 80 

Territorial Itoads Surveyed 42 

Territory of Iowa 25 

Tlie Calico Line 121 

The "P:nvoy" 118 

The Pioneer Priest 167 

Topographical Features 20 

Tornado of I860 309 

Tornadoes 399 

Toronto 278 

Toronto Catholic Church 165 

Township Lines. Changes of 43 

Traffic, River 118 

Transportation 104 

Treasurers 84 

Twenty-sixth Regiment 95 

U 

Uncertain Remuneration 108 

T'ndergroimd Railroad 301 

T'nderlying Formations 33 

T'nion Reformed Cliurch 18:^ 

T'nitetl Presbyterian Church 174 

T'niversjilist Church 184 



Valuation and Tax, 1877 76 

Vanderhurg 73 

Village Plats 388 

Vote on Prohibitory Amendment 442 



W 



Wapsipinicon Lowlands 31 

War Meetings 01 

Warren. Hanging of 422 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 

WMithinf: ('(illepe 14!) Wheiiflaiul, Fires at 331 

Wasliiiif^tdii Tdwnsliip liN-i Wlif itlaiul XowsjiaiKn's 245 

Watei'foid TowiishiiJ 2oS Wheatland Itefunuod Church 184 

Waterman, Charles M 200 V.'he:tlan(l, IiPU!i:iisce:ices of 333 

Weather Talilc 38 While Colhir Line llO 

WHls. Old <-liiit<.H .'!3 William Pitch Well 33 

Wclton liN2 Wdlf lUiu-'ty 73 

Wclton Catholic Church vr, Woodcraft Orders, Founding of 201 

\\('ll<in Colony 55 

Wclton i^eventh-Day r.aptisi ('Inin-li ICM Y 

Wolton Township 2S1 

Wharfmaster. Camanche 297 Toung; Men's Christian Association. 303 

Wheatland 330 Young. W. .7. & Co . .378 

\nio;itland Fifty Yenrs Ago 428 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



Ackerman, George G. 526 

Adrain, Julius 1128 

Ahrens, John B. 992 

Aiknian, E. M. 1098 

Albright. A. J. 501 

Albright, Mrs. Tobitha D. 500 

Alden. Charles F. 878 

Allen, Lucius P. 466 

Ambrose, John P. 1012 

Anderson, Hans 880 

Anderson, James W. 1130 

Anderson. Thomas 498 

Andresen, Christian 861 

Ankeny. Augustus L. 464 

Ashford, William D. 460 

Ashford. William R. 459 

Ashpole, Henry 785 

Atzen, John M. 1014 

B 

Babcock, James O. 999 

Barber, Albert A. '- 904 

Barber, A. E. 648 

Barber, George W. 520 

Barber, William R. ^—r.^ 640 

Barnum, James H. , 1112 

Barr, C. V. 693 

Bather, .John R. 544 

Bauer, Charles H. 1072 

Becker, Henry 672 

Beeby, Charles W. 922 

Beeby, Harry E. 949 

Behr, Hans F. C. 996 

Bendtschneider. John F 937 

Benedict, James C. 737 

Berner, Albert H. 521 

Berst, Carl B. 1009 

Bingham, Charles C. 794 

Blake, Charles A. 608 



Blodt, John J. 836 

Blumer, .Joseph F. 944 

Blunk. Hans C. 525 

Blunt. Arthur W. 908 

Boardman, Norman 496 

Bohart, Charles S. 610 

Borbeck, Joseph 862 

Bormann, Louis J. 801 

Bousselot, Henry E. 566 

Bowers, Henry F. 552 

Brandenburg, John C. 1042 

Brick, Conrad 621 

Briggs, Stephen ,_ 484 

Broderick, James 765 

Broomfeldt, Lewis C. 958 

Broxam, Benjamin 891 

Brumer, Robert G. 775 

Buech, Charles 940 

Buell, Elijah 575 

Buell, Langworthy J. 972 

Buell, William E. ^__ 574 

Buennig, Claus 605 

Burke, Thomas J. 643 

Busch. George C. 519 

Butzloff. F. L. 468 

Buxton, Perry T. 655 

C 

Cahill. Patrick 1126 

Cain, Edward L. 1026 

Carlin, :\I. F. 661 

Carroll. William H. 876 

Carstensen, Julius 553 

Cavey, Matthew B. 527 

Chandler, Esek B. ____; 616 

rhai)nian, Lee '. 1138 

Chase, Charles W. 869 

Christensen, Engle J. 540 

Christensen, Hans H. 947 

Christensen, Peter _. ^-, . 896 

Christian, Madison L. 1050 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Christiansen. Carl J. 993 

Clancy. .John 651 

Clapp. John W. 549 

Clark. .James B. 931 

Clark. William B. 938 

('l.ins4M). C.-irl C. ^ 71(1 

Clausen. Engver N. "90 

Claussen. Claus .1. 4.^)4 

Clinton Business College 844 

Clinton Sugar Refining Co. 878 

Cole. Ansel O. 817 

Cole. Charles W. 595 

Collins. Seth L. 1088 

Connole. Cecil V. 743 

Conrad. Charles C. 750 

Conrad. Harold F. 752 

Conrad, J. C. & Sons 750 

Cook. Alfred L. 1063 

Cook. Edmund L. 933 

Cook, John B. 1022 

Cooper, Robert D. 777 

Cornish, Oscar P. 1084 

Correll, Alf E. 848 

Corson, Truelove M. 995 

Cossins, Horace M. 959 

Crampton, William B. 1015 

Creger, John Henry 1073 

Cressey. John H. 1136 

Cressey, Robert E. 508 

Creveling. Samuel 770 

Crockett. Harrison U. 536 

Crockett, Samuel Y. 536 

Cummings. Langdon J. 580 

Cunningham, John 813 

Curtis. Charles F. 694 

Curtis. George M. 445 

Curtis. Liman J. 634 

D 

DeLange. James 701 

Detlef. Julius 613 

Dexter. Horatio R. 884 

Dice. Bruce 1106 

Dice, Helen 1106 

Dice, Samuel 1106 

Dickey. John W. 1113 

Diebner. Emil 766 

Dieckmann. William L. 820 



Dicrks. Ili-nry 1177 

Dierks, Henry W. 669 

Dilley. Sebastian C. 597 

Disbrow. Martin A. 1096 

Dixoon. John 1139 

Dolan. James E. 1008 

Dolan. John 1035 

Dolan, Martin 1035 

Duer. Peter C. 510 

Dulany. George W., Jr. 747 

Duley, Joseph I. 1141 

Dunlap, John W. 997 

Dutton, Jerome 584 

Dutton. O. L. 680 

Dutton, Lorenzo D. 624 

E 

Eastman, Lauren C. 542 

Eaton, Ebenezer 854 

Eaton, William D. 854 

Edens. .John H. 632 

Eggers. Hans 1057 

Ellis, Frank W. 866 

Ellis, Lyman A. 867 

Evans. John W. 829 

F 

F.iirchild, D.-ivid S. 1000 

Fallesen, Peter 1116 

Farrell, Peter 561 

Farrell, Thomas 1045 

Fay, Clarence A. 863 

Fay, Horace A. 973 

Fay, Louis E. 973 

Fegan, Josepli D. 984 

Fields. Jesse S. .547 

Flynn. Mathew 1027 

Fox, Henry F. 654 

Fox. John F. 1021 

Frnhm. Charles M. n64 

G 

Gage, Frank 1023 

Gage. Marshall S. B. 976 

Galbraith. Henry G. 1056 

Gallf)\vay. Daniel C. 1147 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Gardiner. Silas W. 456 

Gelilsen, John J. lios 

(Jeorne, Calvin H. S>S(t 

Gibson. Richard .1. 798 

Gluesing. Claus .1. 936 

Gohlnian. Christoph J. 816 

Gohlman, .John G. 499 

Gohlniann, M.ithJMs T. S.")ti 

Goodnow, Royal 1106 

Gradert, Gustav 462 

Green. Jacob 531 

Grlebel, Henry C. 792 

Grumstrup, Thomas D. 808 

Grmnstrui), Walda :\1. 808, 832 

H 

Ifahn. Henry N. 63.t 

Hale. Edward .T. 802 

Hallinan. Edward L. 452 

Hannaher. Thomas C. 782 

Hanrahan. William F. 945 

Hansen, Fred G. 477 

Hansen. John C. 837 

Hanssen. Eugene 741 

Harrington, Andrew L. 1029 

Harrington. Chaimcey S. 909 

Hart. Claude D. 874 

Hart, Edward. Jr. 529 

Hart. Edward. Sr. 530 

Hart. Paul D. 874 

Hart. Reuben C. ■.^___ 841 

Hartmann. August .__ TSO 

Hasenmiller. William , 490 

Hauke. Thomas E. ^ 687 

Hayes, George V. 784 

Hayes, Walter T. 571 

Heflin, Benjamin J. ^ 846 

Heie, Rev. Johanas J. . 744 

Hemingway. Fred B. ^^^__ 470 

Hennessy, Rev. :\T. J. . 963 

Henningsen. B. H. A. . 920 

Herkelman. William __1124 

Hesse. Frank ,^ __:_ 649 

Higgins, Israel 582 

Hilbert. C. Henry 546 

Hilbert, W. ^\. ,_ 1145 

Hill. Olin E. ^_ ,828 

Hines. William 650 



Hinrich. August 1146 

Iliuton. Thomas S. 810 

Hoffmann, Jacob 1016 

Holconih, Fred C. 557 

Holmes. William 472 

Honirighausen. George 641 

Momrighausen, John F. 702 

Homrighausen, .John X. 948 

Hooks, Charles F. 828 

Horstmann, Bismark C. 664 

Horstmann, Gustav A. 746 

Horstmann, H. F. 1__1142 

Howes. Philip 604 

Hughes, Richard 824 

Hunter. Joseph 697 

Hynes, .Michrel H. 1121 

I 

Illemann. M. H. 507 

Ingebrigthsen, Peder 916 

Ingwersen, Martin 77G 

Ingwersen. Nicholas E. 611 

Irwin, Clarence C. 1076- 

Iten. Louis 1078 

J 

Jackson, .Julius M. 1110 

Jaenicke. Adolph 739 

Jameyson, Hiram E. 823 

.largo, Charles ,_^ , 10.17 

Jargo, William F. 1017 

Jensen, Christ . ; .696 

Joehnk, Henry C. ^^_^__, ^,^.,461 

John. Howard D. ^ ,__ 831 

John. :\rilo J. 830 

Joiinson, Hans . -621) 

.T.orgensen, Carl -,w--~ -797 

.lorgensen. Soren . ^^ ^ = 971 

•Joyce. William T. ,._.___1060 

K , • 

Kallenbach, John __^. __-.,638. 

Ka.llenbach. Joseph , ._.__, 492 

Ka,llenbach. Nick ^^ ._^.491. 

Kehoe. Edward M. _.. ^ -853 

Keiner. Louis C. 942 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Keith. Willis E. S47 

Kelly Brothers 742 

Kelly. David E. 1032 

KHIy. J. A. 742 

Kelly. John W. 617 

Kelly. Lee C. 812 

Kelly. P. H. 742 

Kelly. Robert Bruce 788 

Kelly. Samuel S. 448 

Kelly. T. F. 742 

Kelly. W. .1. 742 

Kenney. Charles W. 821 

Kershner. Frank O. 6.57 

Kester, Carl John F. 504 

Kinp. F. B. 818 

Kistner. George P. 917 

Klahn. Hugo 642 

Klahn. Julius 658 

Kimtzan. Henry 1134 

Koons. William 480 

Korn, Otto 881 

Kramer. August 932 

Krunipelmann. Clem 781 

Kruse. Clans (Clintx)n) 865 

Kruse. Claus 924 

Kuebler. Conrad 629 

Kuehn. William C. 988 

L 

Lamb. Artemus 684 

Lamb. Chancy 731 

Lamb. Garrett E. 676 

Lamb. James D. 1030 

Lamb. Lafayette 681 

Langbehn. William O. 656 

Lathrop. Charles H. 625 

Lee. William 475 

I^eedhan. Frank W. 700 

Leedham, William 543 

Leimbach. William 614 

Lietz. John 860 

Llndmeier. Henry 779 

Ix)gan. John J. 762 

Lohberg. Frank . 968 

Ix)hberg. Franz . 1 969 

Loofboro. Isaac N. 1007 

Lubbers. John , 1028 

Lund. Christian IHiO 



Lund. Herman 675 

Lund. John 676 

Lund, Justus 675 

Lund, Virtus 673 

Mc 

.McCarthy. Frank L. 793 

.McCord, Elias S. 1086 

McDermott. Frank J. 822 

McGarry. W. A. 645 

.McGinn, Francis P. 960 

McKenna, William H. 773 

McLaughlin. Very Rev. Edward J. __ 600 

McLaughlin. Rev. P. V. 601 

McMahon. Charles E. 758 

McMillin. John W. 1094 

M 

.MacMiller, George 1044 

MacguiJ;^^ Willi.-ini s.S2 

Madden. Malchi Kane 890 

Magnussen. Christ 453 

Manion. Patrick H. 449 

.Manning, Dennis C. 1135 

:\Iartin. Hobart E. 839 

Marx. Joseph 1107 

.Mason, Martin 734 

Mason. Peter 735 

Matson. Eric C. 842 

Matthiesen, Emil C. 1118 

.Matzen, Frank J. 837. 

.M.itztMi & II:iusen S:i7. 

.May. Calvin D. 678 

Meints. Christ 487 

Meints. John 736 

Melvin. .Matthew J. 803 

-Messer. William W. 757 

Meves. William .L .,___ 928 

Meyer. Albert J. 479 

.Miller. Charles V. 1041 

.Miller. Edwin W. _, 1040. 

Miller. John W. 826 

.Miller. Peter J. 809 

.Mitchell. Fred W. . 749 

Moeszinger, Chris. 671 

Morris, George 786 

Mudge. Myron C. - 979 

Mueller. Fred 1003 

Mueller. Fred J. ..— 951 



BIOGRAPHICAL IHDEX. 



Mueller, Henry S. e22 

Mulvihill. Kdward 511 

Murphy, Patrick 1036 

Murray. Rev. J. A 864 

N 

Naeve, Nicholas. Jr. 769 

Nelson, Rev. .James J. 451 

Newbern, Lester F. 538 

Newniarch, William .__ 910 

Nissen, Nis 764 

O 

Obert, Casin B. 1070 

O'Connor, Thomas C. 1082 

O'Dowd. Rev. Peter 1080 

Ogden, James J. 1066 

Olson, Edwin 567 

Olson, Eli 565 

Olson, Nils O. 494 

Owens, Peter J. 806 

P 

Parker, Celinda 587 

Pascal, Aylett L. 478 

Pascal, Descartes L. 986 

Peckhara, F. E. 878 

Pelham, Cornelius H. 915 

Penningroth, Henry 703 

Perin, Noble 465 

Peters, Henry C. 967 

Petersen, Cornelius ^_- 929 

Petersen, Hans H. 1090 

Petersen, Nils 486 

Petersen, Peter N. 763 

Peterson. James 851 

Phelps. George B. 534 

Phillips. Dewitt H. 1106 

Phillips, William 1106 

Pingel, Herbert 524 

Pingel. Otto D. 523 

Porth, Charles J. 647 

Porth, Henry 644 

Porth, Yengle A. 533 

Poston, William H. 814 

Potter, J. Ward 789 

Purcell, John E. 768 

R 

R:ind. Ri.hert N. 570 

Rand, Robert W. 569 



Rand. Samuel 569 

Rand, William A. 569 

Rands, The Four 568 

Ranson, Edward 637 

Rathie, William 1058 

Rathje. John H. W. 618 

Record, Aaron P. 965 

Redden, William 759 

Reihman, J. W. 474 

Reimers, Fred 887 

Rice. William S. 805 

Riggs, Andrew J. 897 

Riggs, John. Jr. 897 

Riordan, Rev. D. 471 

Ritter, Theodore C. 900 

Rixon, Fred 753 

l{(>ck, F. H. 688 

Rock, J. F. 495 

Roehling, William 515 

Roennfeldt, Claus D. 962 

Roennfeldt, Hans D. 962 

Roennfeldt. Otto B. 961 

Rogers, William 517 

Rohwedder. Henry 560 

Roscoe, Charles E. 1048 

Rosland, Gunder J. 493 

Ruggeberg, Lewis 1047 

Russell, Amherst W. 1064 

Russell, Friend E. 1065 

Russell, Gideon A. 800 

Russell. William E. 691 

Rutenbeck, Edward 514 

S 

Sackrider. George W. 1004 

Sadoris. Charles L. 555 

Savage. Rollin H. 811 

Schepers, August 1120 

Schei)ers, Herman 1069 

Schmidt, Ch.irlcs F. r»H!> 

Schmidt, Claus H. 1104 

Schmitt. Louis E. 666 

Schoening. Frederick 1010 

Schoening. Henry .1010 

Schoenthaler. Charles 1127 

Schoenthaler, John E. 971 

Schroecler. Benjamin H. 1(»74 

Schroeder. Chris 956 

Schroeder, Jacob 906 

Schroeder, Peter F. 1102 



BrOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Schunter. C. J. ^^2 

Scott. Samuel C. 583 

Scott. William W. 505 

Seaman, Halleck W. 1092 

Shaw. Fred B. 8.58 

Shoecraft. Simon 740 

Siegniund. William F. 57G 

Siemsen. Rudolph F. 903 

Simon, .lohn W. 906 

Simpson, Andrew 564 

Slapnicka. Frank 913 

Smith. George A. 698 

Smith, George C. — 689 

Smith, George :\I. 603 

Smith, John W. "795 

Soenksen, Christ 660 

Soenksen. :\Iartin C. 752 

Spain. Cornelius 990 

Spain. Michael J. 989 

Spence, James H. 772 

Steiner, Joseph G. 631 

Stephenson, George W. 558 

Stires, Charles 1053 

Stockwell, Ira 1140 

Stoffregen. Henry . 554 

Stone, Augustus L. 729 

Strove, John 578 

Struve, William 1019 

Stuedemann. Albert H. __1038 

Suiulfrlin. Floyd L. SSn 

T 

Temple, Gilbert L. 988 

Tlie Four Kjimls _._! uO"^ 

Thiel, Michael 760 

Thompson, Daniel — 919 

Thusen, Mathias M. "755 

Thtisen, Peter M. 755 

Toenningsen, Henry J. 579 

Towl«>, I'iiiiK'Ms S. 87;") 

Traver, William R. 894 

Tritschler. Louis P. 528 

Turner, John H. -.1 '668 

Turner, Merritt G. __J 563 

Tyler. Henry F. 592 

Tyler. William A. _'J_:J— 952 

V 

Van Kpps. Aldon J. -__:Il_'____'Jl__1054 



Vetter, August F. 541 

Voss, Henry C. 982 

W 

Wadleigh. Erastus A. 512 

Wadleigh, LeRoi B. 606 

Walsh Bros. 1131 

Walsh. Edmund C. _— 1132 

Walsh. Mark A. L 1134 

Walsh, James W. 1134 

Walsh. Charles H. 1134 

Walsh, Alfred E. 1134 

Walsh, Eugene J. 1134 

Warning, Henry 808, 840 

Watkins, John B. 1034 

Waugh, Birt 926 

Wendel, Adolph 535 

Wendel. .John G. 503 

Weston, John C. 482 

White. William 850 

Wilke, Fred C. 859 

Wilke, William A. 827 

Willet. Charles H. 596 

Willet. :\Irs. Flora 594 

Williams. John ^^1___ 902 

Wilson, George E. 550 

Wilson. George E. . 886 

Wilson. John L. 833 

Wilson, William L. 599 

Wirth. Alexander J. 1002 

Wirth. John 1001 

Witte, Frank 659 

Witte, Fred 665 

Wolfe. James B. 628 

Wolfe. Jerry 843 

Wolfe, Patrick B. 912 

Work. Alexander 562 

Work, Nis P. 607 

Wulf. J. C. 1143 

Wulf. Nicholas F. 872 

Wurmke. Diedrich 1025 

Wurmke. Herman F. 1024 

Y 

Young, Edward E. ._! 893 

Young. Joseph C. 888 

Young. William E. x 662 

Young, William J. .__^__, 48^, 



•nir NEW VJVAK 

rrV.IAC LlBiURY 



iu.„^; .o.;ndations 



BIOGRAPHICAL-Continued. 



AUGUSTUS L. STONE. 

In the book entitled ''Prominent Men of the Great West," pubHshed in 
Chicago in 1894. is found the following biographical history of Augustus L. 
Stone, the subject of this article. It was written by L. J. Gage, at that time 
president of the First National Bank of Chicago and afterwards secretary of 
the United States treasury under Presidi^nt McKinley. The acquaintance of 
the two mentioned parties was formed in Rome. New York, while A. L. Stone 
was attending the academy there. ■ ... 

"Augustus Lisbon Stone, son of Aaron and Amanda (Parsons) Stone, 
was born in Camden, New York, June 8, 1836. On the paternal side his 
ancestors came from London. England, in 1635, and settled at what is now 
Cambridge, Massachusetts, near Boston. The locality is yet known as the 
Stone farm. The David Stone of that family who shouldered his musket 
and- marched to Lexington on that 19th day of April, 1775, to repel the 
British troops, and fight the first battle of the American Revolution, was a 
direct ancestor of our Augustus Lisbon Stone. . . . . 

"His mother's family, the Parsons, came from Oxfordshire, England, 
with \\'illiam P\^nchon in 1631, and with him founded the first colony at 
Springfield. Massachusetts. The motto, 'Hand Unquam Cedo,' inscribed 
upon the scroll of the Parsons coat of arms, which was l)estowed by Charles 
I, indicates a family characteristic which was displayed in the New England 

descendants through successive generations. • 

- ■ "The Stone family, including Aaron Stone and his wife, moved from 
New England to the new settlement at-McConnellsville, New York. Avhich was 
so named by Isaac Stone, its first postmaster, and grandfather of the subject 
of this. sketch. The family afterwards moved to Camden, five miles farther 
on. which was a more promising locality. Aaron and Amanda Stone had' 



73^ 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 



three children, of whom Josiah Parsons Stone and Augustus Lisbon Stone 

siirvivetl. 

••The two boys attended the village schools and worked hard to help their 
parents, and their parents strained every energy to give both their sons a 
good education. The village printing office, which issued a weekly paper, 
attracted the boys, and there they worked at odd hours, earning pocket money 
and addling much to their early education by their association with journalistic 
work. 

••The (»ldest son. Josiah P. Stone, worked his way through college and 
was admitted to practice law. which he did until the commencement of the 
war. when his patriotism impelled him to enter into the struggle. He raised 
a companv of volunteers, went into service as captain, and fought wMth great 
gallantry until killed in the memorable siege of Petersburg. Virginia, in 1864. 

"Augustus Lisbon Stone followed somewhat in the same line, working 
and attending school, finally at the academy in Rome. New York. While 
in his academic course, he was called home at seventeen years of age to help 
his father, whom President Pierce had appointed postinaster. Here for eight 
years he labored in the store and postoflfice combined, and for the first time 
in the history of his own family the accumulation of property began. During 
these and after years he studied, sometimes employing tutors, but generally 
unaided. He has substantially educated himself, well and liberally. His 
Iibrar\-, which is exceptionally large, is of decided merit in educational lines. 
In 1864 he wedded Kittie Angell. of Pulaski. New York, w-ho is a lineal 
descendant of Roger Williams and of Gen. Nathaniel Greene. The family of 
Hempstead, of Hempstead, Long Island, is her ancestral origin. Four chil- 
dren were born to them, two of whom survive. Martha Anna and Ruby Eliza- 
l)eth. Kittie I'arsons having died in infancy and Katie Angell at the age of 
seven years. 

"In 1870 Mr. Stone founded, with his cousin. A. G. Smith, the banking 
house of Stone & Smith in Clinton. Iowa. A singleness of purpose, a desire 
to make the bank a thoroughly relial)le and substantial institution, impelled 
him at every solicitation to decline j)lace in public and political life, believing 
his bank should l>c distinctive and separate from associated individuality in 
its officers. Notwithstantling his rule, occasions have demanded, and he has 
accepted, places of trust. He accepted the office of mayor of the municipality 
where he lives, having a unanimous vote. In educational affairs he has been 
honored by election several times to the director^-, without opposition. He 
has been vestryman for many years in the Episcopal church. In various cor- 



PUBLIC LIBIURY 



ASTOR, LENOX, AND 
TILD-EN FOUiNUATlONS 





Srgiiyv; 



C-<^^:Zx7. 



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^^^ ^^ .>-7 ^» /'^ -^ / r\j ^ / ^ ^ ^ r 



CLINTON COUNT V, IOWA. 73 I 

porations he has place in l)oards of directors. The Stone & Smith Bank re- 
solved into the City National luink in 1880, and is the largest in business and 
strength in the section where located. He has been its president since its 
organization. 

"Mr. Stone is a good representative of the class of men who have re- 
deemed what was but a short time back a vast wilderness, and turned it into 
fair cities and fertile farms. The distinguishing traits of his ancestors early 
showed themselves in his character. His undaunted determination to obtain 
an education, even under the most adverse circumstances, being the same 
spirit that enabled the early Pilgrims to conquer the stubborn rocks and hills 
of New England. This has been characteristic of the man (hiring his entire 
life. Careful, energetic, and a capable business man. he enters into an enter- 
prise only after mature deliberation, but once he has undertaken to accom- 
plish an object, he pushes steadily on, overcoming all obstacles until his work 
is crowned with success. Throughout Iowa he is known and respected, while 
his reputation as a careful and capable financier reaches far beyond the 
boundaries of his home state. To him and to others of similar character the 
West owes much of her present greatness and prosperity. L. J. G." 

The above biography stops at 1894. Of the two surviving children, 
Martha Anna married F. B. Burbank and moved to Sioux City, where she 
died. Ruby Elizabeth married Roscoe W. Armstrong and lives in Ringwood 
(Clinton) ; one child has been born to them and is named Roscoe Whalen 
Armstrong. Jr.. and is nearly one year old now (December i, 1910). 

Mr. Stone retired from the banking business in 190T and is now president 
of the Stone-Cook Lumber Company in Clinton and Low Moor. Iowa, of 
which Robert Hall, of Low Moor, is vice-president and J. B. Smoller, of 
Clinton, is secretary. The Park Falls (Wisconsin) Cedar Company is com- 
posed of F. P. Stone, Wausau. president, A. L. Stone, vice-president, and 
S. H. Cook, secretarv and manas:er. 



CHANCY LAMB. 



One of the most significant memorials that any man can have, is the 
memory, by those who know him, of courtesy, thoughtfulness for others and 
kindness shown in everv-dav life to those with whom he came in contact. 



-._. CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

Such a iiicnK.rial has Chancy Lamb, of Chnton. Iowa, who died July 12. 
1897. at the ripe age of eighty-one years, after a lifetime of unusual useful- 
ness and after having achieved niaterial success as well as being crowned with 
the blessings that a life such as his so richly deserves. 

Mr. Lamb was a descendant of Thomas Lamb, who came from England 
with (ic)vernor Winthrop's fleet in 1630 and settled at Roxbury. Massachusetts. 
Chancv Lamb was horn January 4. 1816. at Ticonderoga, Essex county. New 
York, and there spent his' early years. When still a mere lad. he performed 
the duties of a man for several years, working on his father's farm. He at- 
tended school a few weeks during the winter, which was about the only oppor- 
tunitv he hid for acquiring a hmited education. Later he worked for two 
vears in a sawmill on Lake George, near Ticonderoga. at a place called 
Hague. The mill was owned by the Balcom family. In 1836 the young man 
went to Benton. Yates county. New York, where he learned the trade of a 
millwright. The next three years were spent working in a sawmill at Brad- 
ford. Steuben county. Xew ^'ork. His experience as a millwright and sawyer 
fitted him to take charge of the construction of a sawmill on the outlet of Lake 
Keuka. near Penn Yan. Xew York, for R. L. Chapman, in the summer of 
1841. I'pon the completion of the mill the following year. Mr. Lamb oper- 
ated it imder contract for the owner. In November, 1842. he returned to 
Brr^dford. where he took a contract to run a sawmill for Cameron. Thurman 
& Company, and continued with this firm in the capacity of superintendent 
until the summer of 1844. when he moved to Carroll county. Illinois. Mr. 
Lamb- was one of several men of family who migrated to this western terri- 
tr>ry and located in what is yet known as the Bailey settlement. Argo. about 
ten miles from Savannah and eighteen liiiles from Clinton. Iowa. He spent 
about six years in farming and stock raising in the growing settlement. In 
those days wheat was hauled in wagons to Chicago and supplies were obtained 
from that young metropolis. 

But farm life was not to the liking of Mr. Lamb, and he saw more op- 
portunities in the lumber business. So, in 185 1. he left the Bailey settle- 
ment and went to W'illiamsport. Pennsylvania, where he became superin- 
tendent of the mill ()|)erations of J. C. Cameron & Company, and in the fol- 
lf)wing year operated the mills of the company in Chemung county. X^ew York, 
sawing by the thousand. He spent three and one-half years in charge of the 
Rig Flats mill, and at the expiration of that period he went to Canada with a 
man named Curtis, with whom he entered into partnership, the firm building 
a mill at Barrie. near Toronto. At the end of a vear and a half Mr. Lamb" 



CLINTON COUNTY. IOWA. 733 

sold out to his partner and returned to the west, and for a few months was a 
resident of FuUon, Illinois. 

Mr. Lamb had spent the better part of his life up to this time in saw- 
milling, and he chose this as his vocation. Tie seized an opportunity to 
buv a small lumber yard and sawmill at Clinton, Iowa, operated by Gray & 
Lunt. Upon coming- into possession of the property Mr. Lamb rebuilt the 
mill, which was the first modern plant in Clinton and was located at the point 
where the Chicago & Northwestern railway crosses the Mississippi river. 
This mill was burned October 6. 1857, and the owner proceeded to replace it 
w itii a more complete plant about two blocks south of the original site. The 
new mill had as its equipment two gangs, a mulay and circular, and a shingle 
and lath mill, and was one of the best ecjuipped on the Mississippi river. Mr. 
Lamb conducted the business under his own name until 1864. when he took 
his oldest son, Artemus, into partnership, the firm name being changed to C. 
Lamb & Son. In ^larch. 1868, the foundation of a stone sawmill was laid, 
and this mill began operation in September of the same year. 

C. Lamb & Son bought an interest in the Cobb mill property at River- 
side, a surburb of Clinton, in the winter of 1868 and organized a firm styled 
Lamb, Byng & Company, composed of themselves, S. B. Gardiner. S. W. 
Gardiner and John Byng. Four years later this firm secured the sawmill of 
Wheeler & Warner, which was located a short distance below the Cobb mill 
in Clinton. The Lamb concern became known as C. Lamb & Sons in 1874, 
by Lafayette Lamb, a son of Chancy Lamb, being taken in as a partner. In 
the spring of 1877 C. Lamb & Sons took over the interests of S. B. and S. W. 
Gardiner and John Byng in Lamb, Byng & Company, and in January, 1878, 
C. Lamb & Sons was incorporated, with Chancy Lamb, president. Lafayette 
Lamb, vice-president, and Artemus Lamb, secretary and treasurer. 

Mr. Lamb is believed to have been the first manufacturer to employ the 
band mill in sawing white pine. In 1883. having heard band mills were in 
use in Indiana and Tennessee for sawing hardwood veneering and making 
poplar lumber, he investigated and then purchased a London, Berry & Orton 
sawmill which took the place of a circular in one of the four Clinton mills. 
The innovation was a success, and later another mill was equipped with a 
band saw. 

The mechanical instinct was largely developed in Mr. Lamb, and he was 
the inventor of several appliances which are in general use today. One of 
these inventions was an edger with movable saws by which the width of 
boards being sawed could be changed while the mill was in full operation. 



;u 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 



lie alx) invented a trimmer for the trimming of hoards to any length, and it is 
a matter of local history that he used a hull chain, or endless chain, in hauhng 
lot's out of the river hefore this device was heard of hy anyone else in that 
locality. lie designed, for one of the Lamh mills, a friction log turner, and 
after it had heen in successful use for a long time Mr. Lamh learned that the 
patent office had termed it a '•nigger" and had deemed the invention of such 
importance as to invest it with letters patent. The Lambs were the first to 
depart from the crude methods of towing logs and to operate a fleet of 
steamers. 

When the company sawed its last log at Clinton. October 26, 1904, Mr. 
Lamb and his sons during the life of the operations had manufactured and 
|)ut upon the market more than three billion feet of white pine lumber, not 
including the production of shingles, lath and pickets. 

Mr. Laml) married Jane Bevier at Bradford, New York, November 16, 
1839. She was the daughter of David Bevier, who had served as an adjutant 
of the Third Ulster County (New York) Regiment in the Revolutionary war. 
She was a faithful partner of her husband for fifty-eight years, during which 
time two sons, Artemus and Lafayette, and four daughters, Augusta, Celeste, 
Merrette and Emma E., were born. Three of these children are living. 
Lafayette Lamb, Mrs. Augusta A\'are and Mrs. Emma E. Young. Mrs. 
Lamb died March 5. 1897. In her death the poor lost a sympathetic friend 
who never turned a deaf ear to their appeals. 

Mr. Lamb was a member of no social organization, except the Benevolent 
and I'njtective Order of Elks. He was Whig in his early life, and in 1840 
cast his first vote for Harrison, later in life becoming a Republican. He 
attended the Presbyterian church ami gave liberally to its support and to 
charities, and he did much for the general upbuilding of his community and 
was held in high esteem by all classes owing to his exemplary life. 



MARTIN MASON. 



One of the successful and thrifty farmers of western Clinton count v is 
Martin Mason, who is a worthy son of a worthy sire, representing a .sterling 
old Nrjrweigan family, long promintnit and influential in the affairs of this 
locality. Owing to the fact that his father was a man of such industrv and 




MR. AND MRS. PETER MASON 



THE M^' ' f^^'^^ 

PUBLIC III;. .ART 



ASTOK. u:no^:, and 

TILUEN FOCNUATIONS 
It L 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 735 

integritv. the niajor ])ait of this skctcli will be devoted to his career, which has 
now been cli)scd In the hand nt death. 

Martin Mason was b(jrn in Clinton county November 24, 1874. and is 
the son of Peter and Serena (Severson) Mason. The father was born in 
March, 1S44, in Xorwav. and was the son of Madson and Madila (Peterson) 
Madson, both born in .Xorwav. from which country they came to America 
in 1871, direct to Clinton county. Iowa, locating- in Olive township, two miles 
west of Calamus, where the father lived until his death, after which event 
his widow moved to Hamilton county. Towa. where her death occurred. 

Peter Mason was educated in Norway and grew to maturity there. He 
came to America in i86() and located at Lisbon. Illinois, working on a railroad 
there, then foll'owed threshing and later farming, and al)out iS^S he came to 
Olive township. Clinton county, Iowa, and took up farming. He was a 
good manager and a hard worker and accumulated a handsome competence, 
becoming the owner of a fine fami of two hundred and forty acres, on which 
he placed excellent improvements and had a substantial and attractive home. 
He was unaided in his life work and always relied upon himself. He became 
well known throughout the western part of Clinton county and was highly 
respected and induential. 

Peter Alason married, in 1872, Serena Severson. who was born in Nor- 
wav and who came to America in 1866 and located in Clinton county. Iowa, 
ha\'ing been accompanied by her sister. To Mr. and Mrs. Peter Mason the 
following children were born: Martin, Albert S.. Eli J.. H. M.. Lars J. 
(deceased). Peter. Jr., and Ida Inger (deceased). 

Martin Mason was educated in the home schools and while a young man 
weTit to the far West, spending five and one-half years in Oregon, working on 
a farm in that state. Returning to Iowa, he worked on a farm in Webster 
count V three years. With these exceptions, he has li\Td on the homestead 
in Clinton countv. He has been very successful in the management of this 
place, operating one hundred and eighteen acres, thirty-eight acres being of the 
old home place. The rest he has added subsequently. He has made ex- 
tensive and valuable improvements on the place, erecting substantial, modern 
and convenient buildings, fences, etc. In 1906 he erected the first cement 
farm house ever built in the township. He has beautified his place in many 
ways. He carries on general farming and stock raising, giving all his atten- 
tion to the same. 

Martin Mason was married on April 18, 1901, to Anna\Maria Christian- 
sen. daughtcT of Peter Christiansen and wife, a full sketch of whom appears 



-:^6 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA, 

elsewhere in this work. To Mr. and Mrs. Martin Mason these children have 
been born : Ida Alice. Leonard John. Madila Cecilia and Clara Josephine. 

The Mason familv are faithful members of the Norwegian Lutheran 
church. Politicallv. Mr. Mason is a Republican, but neither he nor his father 
ever cared for public office. 



TOHX MEIXTS. 



One of that large horde of tlirifty citizens from the loved and famed 
fatherland who have done such a commendable work in developing the great 
resources of Clinton county, Iowa, is John Meints, a thrifty farmer and stock 
raiser of Orange tow nship, who has won an excellent landed estate and cozy 
home, also a position of honor in his community, because he has worked along 
proper lines. He therefore deserves his success, as will be seen by a perusal 
of a brief history of his veiy busy career. 

Mr. Meints was born in Cicrmany July 3, 1862. and is the son of Claus 
Meints, who is mentioned at some length in the sketch of Christ Meints. But 
it might be said here that he was always regarded as an honest, industrious 
citizen, who took much pains in rearing his family to the same habits and 
principles that had always actuated his course. 

John Meints was educated in Germany, where he grew to maturity and 
being still young when he came to the L'nited States, he also attended school 
here. He accompanied his parents to our shores in 1875 ^"^ located south of 
Grand Mound. Clinton county. Iowa. He assisted in developing the home- 
stead there, and he has always been a farmer and a very successful one, too. 
He started in life with but little capital and he has never been helped over- 
much, but he is now the owner of one of the finest farms in Orange township, 
consisting of two hundred and forty acres, which he has brought up to a high 
state of improvement and has enriched the fields so that the original strength 
of the soil is retained and abundant harvests reaped from vear to vear. In 
if)OQ he put up a modern dwelling, beautifully located and attractive from an 
architectural viewpoint and equipped with modern appliances. He carries 
on general farming and is a breeder of good live stock. He takes an interest 
in local affairs and is at present .secretary of the .school board in Orange town- 
'>hip. having very ably filled this position for the past twelve vears. 

Mr. Meints has been secretarv of the German Mutual Fire and Lisfhtninsf 
Insurance Company for the past fourteen years; he has also been secretarv of 
the Farmers Mutual Telephotie Company of this county, since its organization 





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CLINTON fOUNTV, IOWA. y};] 

in 1900. and he has filled holli tiiese positions in a manner that rdlects much 
credit upon his innate ability and to the entire satisfaction of all concerned. 

Mr. Meinls was married in 1887 to Catherine Kuehl. who was born in 
Germany and who came to the Unitetl States when a child with her parents 
and located in Olive township, Clinton county, Iowa, where she was reared 
and educated and where her parents became well estabhshe-d and the family- 
very favorably known. This union has resulted in the birth of the followini,^ 
children: IJulda. Tiene. Anna. Catherine, Henry, Carl. Selma ; John died in 
infancv; Herbert and l\al[)li. Mrs. Meints' father, Clans Kuehl, died Janu- 
ary 13. 1908, and her mother passed away on September 3, 1907, both being 
buried at the Buena Vista cemetery, this county. 

Mr. Meints and his family are members of the German Lutheran church. 
Politically, he is a Democrat, but votes independently, especially in local 
atTairs. 

The first six years of his married life were spent in Boxbutte county, 
Nebraska, where Mr. Meints homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres. 
While living there he served as county commissioner and held various other 
ofifices, having been elected by the People's party. Before his marriage he 
traveled extensi\ely. and, being by nature a keen observer, he has been broad- 
ened in this manner and is a well informed man. He has never been an oflfice 
seeker in the true sense of the word. For the past seventeen years he has 
made his home in Orange township, Clinton county, Iowa. 



JAMES C. BENEDICT. 

Tlie invention whicli did the most for the progress of the luiman race 
was tlie alphabet, which enai)led people to record tlieir thoughts and deeds 
in permanent form, the one which has been scarcely second in its efTect to the 
invention of the alphabet was that of the art of printing, which enabled those 
permanently recorded thoughts to be many times duplicated and scattered 
about over the world, for the instruction of others. Tlie first invention made 
progress possible ; the second accelerated the general purpose of the masses 
of mankind and saved learning and science from the sole possession of only 
a few favored few. Mr. licnedict has .spent the greater portion of his life 
in the work of printing, aiding in a practical and definite w^ay in the com- 
munication of thought and the dissemination of knowdedge. 

James C. Benedict was l)orn in Linn county, Iowa. <~>n December 12. i8_i4. 

(47) 



738 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

the son of Lyman D. and Saiepta (M inter) Benedict. His" father was a 
native of Chenango county, Ohio, his mother of London, Ohio, where they 
were married shortly before they came to Linn county, Iowa, in 1841. 
Lyman Benedict was a farmer by occupation, in pohtics, first a Whig, later 
an Alx)litionist. and finally a Republican. He and iiis wife were members of 
the Methodist church, took an active part, and were very much respected and 
esteemed. Of their nine children, four are living. 

James C. Benedict was reared on a Linn county farm, attended the public 
schools and the high school at Alarion, Iowa. He began the printer's trade 
in the ofihce of the Marion Register, at Marion. Iowa, and became so expert 
that he soon was made foreman of the shop. In iS^i he went to California, 
and sj>ent four vears there working at his trade, during which time he became 
well acquainted with Mark Twain, then almost unknown to the world, whom 
he hrst met at Virginia City. ^Ir. Benedict returned from California by 
wav of the Isthmus of Panama, at the time that the French nation was pre- 
paring to dig the canal. During his western stay he had gained experiences 
of great value and passed through many interesting events. On his return 
he located at Marengo, Iowa, and there was the proprietor of the l^rogressiz'e 
Republican. In 1871 he came to De Witt, Clinton county, Iowa, entered the 
Observer office as foreman, and continued in that capacity for thirty-seven 
years. He then became a partner in the paper with S. H. Shoemaker, but soon 
sold his interest to Ed. C. Bnnvn, and engaged in jol) printing at De Witt, 
where he has since been in business. Mr. Benedict is without doubt the oldest 
printer in Iowa. In politics he is a Republican, and takes an active interest 
in both local and national issues. In fraternal relations he is a member of 
the Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, the Modern Woodmen of America, 
the Modern Brotherhood of America, and the Brotherhood of American Yeo- 
men, and in all of these orders has filled the principal oftices. lie is also a 
member of the Keljekahs. Ilis religious affiliations are with the Congrega- 
tional church. 

Mr. Benedict was married in 1835 to Elizabeth O'Mullen, of Marengo, 
Iowa, by whom he became the father of one daughter, Henrietta, who mar- 
ried E. F. Gerkin. of Cedar Falls. Iowa. His wife died in 1871 and he was 
married in 1872 to Sarah Adam Ro.se, of De Witt, bv whom he had two 
children, Elizabeth Rose, the wife of C. G. Morton, of De Witt, and Ruth M.. 
who married Rev. 11. 1*. Garrett, and is now deceased. 

Mr. Benedict is active and hearty, advancing age having laid its hands 
lightly on him. Ik- can look back over a life well spent and full of good 
works, has many friends, and expects to enjoy many more years of life. 



CLINTON' COLNIV. IOWA. 739 

ADOLIMI JAENICKE, M. D. 

European medical scliools have always held a liigher reputation than those 
of this country, and deservedly, though our schools are increasing in efficiency. 
The subject of this sketch had the advantage of the best German medical 
education and is thus the possessor of a better professional training than the 
majority of iVmerican physicians. To this he has added the experience gained 
in long years of practice, and these, combined with his native ability, suffi- 
ciently account for his high professional standing. He has followed carefully 
the progress of modern advances in this most useful of professions and is 
thoroughly up-to-date in his knowledge of medical science. And, full\- recog- 
nizing the value of his German training, he has caused his son to receive a 
similar course in a prominent German medical school, thus giving him every 
advantage at the beginning of his career. 

Adolph Jaenicke was born in East Prussia, Germany, Eebruary 13, 1854, 
son of August and Lina Jaenicke. His parents are natives of Prussia, and his 
father died there about 1898. His mother is still' living. August Jaenicke 
was in the employ of the German government, and held a responsible position 
for many years. He was the father of three children, of whom two are 
living. 

Adolph Jaenicke was educated at Koenigsburg, in the University of 
Wurzburg, and graduated in the class of 1878. He i)racticed in his native 
country for four years, then in 1882 came to America and located at Daven- 
port, Iowa, until 1895, when he came to Clinton, and has since practiced. He 
has given his whole attention to his practice and his profession, to which he 
is much devoted. He is a member of the Iowa State and Clinton County 
Medical Societies, and takes a prominent part in all professional activities. 

Doctor Jaenicke was married in Germany to Katharine Hahn, who has 
borne to him two sons, Kurt, born April 30, 1883, and Ralph, born June 15, 
1885. Kurt graduated in medicine from the University of Iowa in 1905, 
spent two years in Europe as a student at Berlin, and is associated w ith his 
father in practice. He is a member of the Iowa State and Clinton County 
Medical Associations, of which latter he is the president. Ralph is a reg- 
istered pharmacist and lives in Davenport. He married Mina Miller, of 
Burlington, Iowa. 

Doctor Jaenicke is a physician of the highest standing and reputation and 
is also personally one of the l^est liked men in liis community. Able and in- 
telligent, devoted to his profession, he has been ^\•e]l rewarded tor tlie time 
spent in its pursuit. 



j^O CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

SLMOX SliOECRAFT. 

The biographer is always glad when it falls to his lot to review the life 
of a man whose history is at once as interesting and instructive as that of the 
one whose name heads this article, a business man who has won success by 
strict integrity and who has applied in his daily hfe the principles of the 
Christian religion. He has had a life of varied experience and has seen his 
share of hardships, but has overcome them and has brought to the later years 
of his life a philosophy of living which is not new, which has satisfied him 
and which he believes will satisfy others. 

Simon Shoecraft was l>orn in Oswego county. New York, September 22, 
1836. the son of Joseph and Lany (Calkins) Shoecraft. His paternal grand- 
father was Peter Shoecraft, who hved and died in New York, he and his wife 
dving when Simon was very young. They were Germans who came very 
early to Herkimer county. New York, and afterwards removed to Oswego 
county. 

Joseph Shoecraft was born in Herkimer count)', grew up on the farm, 
served in the war of 1812, and made farming his lifelong occupation. His 
wife was a native of the same county. He took a prominent part in local 
politics, but w as ne\er an office seeker. Of his sixteen children, nine sons and 
seven daughters, four sons and one daughter are surviving in 1910; Henry, 
living in New York, aged eighty-five ; Francis, aged about eighty ; William, 
about seventy-six: and Simon; Virilla, widow of J. W. Caldwell. 

Simon Shoecraft was educated in the country schools of New York, at- 
tending them until fourteen. An older brother had worked on the farm until 
twenty-one, then, without a dollar to start, worked his way through college. 
Returning, he persuaded his parents to allow Simon to attend school' at Oneida, 
where he prepared for Cazeno\ ia Seminary, from which he graduated in 
1858, and then came to Clinton, Iowa. He taught school one year at De 
Witt, then attended Cornell College at Mount Vernon. Iowa, and graduated 
there in 1862. While there he sawed wood to pay his tuition, and in sum- 
mer worked in the liarve.st fields and wherever he could find something to do. 
At commencement in 1862, W. H. Lunt, of Clinton, who was president of the 
school board of that city, was looking for a teacher, and the president of 
Cornell recommended Mr. Shoecraft. and so he was hired to teach here and 
continued until April. 1866. when he entered the fuel business. Beginning 
in a small way. Mr. Hosford furnished the money and Mr. Shoecraft ran the 
business. Two years later he to(ik uji the business alone, and until his son 
grew up continued thus, lie h;is been in continuous business longer than 



CLINTON COUNTV, IOWA. 74I 

any other in this part of the county and has been on the avenue long enough 
to see every house put up. His l)usiness now is \ery extensive. In pohtics 
he is a RepubHcan, with independent tendencies. He is a member of no 
fraternities or ckibs, and finds his enjoyment in his home and family. 

Mr. Shoecraft was married in 1865 to Jutie C. Mcintosh, daughter of 
L. W. and Eunice Carter Mcintosh, who had come to Vernon, New York, 
from Connecticut, where Jutie was born. They are the parents of two chil- 
dren, Lucius M.. in l)usiness with his father, and Letitia, who lives at home. 

Mr. Shoecraft is very cheerful and a pleasant man to meet. He owns, 
besides his business, a thousand-acre stock farm in Jackson county, and lives in 
a fine residence at Xo. 539 Fifth avenue. He and his wife are members of 
the Methodist church, and he is a firm believer in the religion of the Bible, and 
believes that if a young man will but have faith in God he cannot fail to suc- 
ceed. His own faith has jjeen justified and he has observed many others who 
have found it thus. 



EUGENE HANSSEN. 



Nothing is more marked than the change which has taken place in the 
farmer's situation in the last few years. At a time not more than twenty 
years distant, he seemed to be the most unfortunate of men and to have ever}- 
man's hand against him. But what a change today. Now he is in a position 
of command. Circumstances have so altered that he is no longer at the 
mercy of the traders and transporters. l)ut is holding the reins himself, is 
receiving high prices for his produce, and is becoming envied by the city 
dwellers because of his prosperity. Twenty years ago the lianks were loaning 
city money to farmers on mortgages; now the banks are loaning farmers' 
money to city men on mortgages. 

Eugene Hanssen was born in Deep Creek township. Clinton county, 
Iowa, December 21. 1858, a son of Otto and I'redericka ( Asniussen) Hans- 
sen, both natives of Germany, he born in 18J5 and she in T83J. On July 
4. 1854, thev landed in New \'ork City, after an ocean passage of eleven 
weeks, and located finally in Iowa, near Sabula, Jackson county, on a farm. 
Two vears later they l)ought the farm on wliich Eugene was born, and in 
1901 moved to Bryant, Iowa, where Otto Hanssen died in April, 1905, and 
where his widow still lives. They are the parents of fifteen children, of whom 
ten are living. He was a Repu1)lican in ])olitirs in earlier life, 1)ut after- 
ward became a Democrat. He and his familv were nu'inl)ers of the Lutheran 



742 • CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

church. He was elected assessor of Deep Creek township for many terms, 
and was also trustee for some time. The peii])le n\ that township had great 
confidence in liini and respected him hi^hlx'. 

Eugene Hanssen was reared on a tarm and e(hicaled in the pubHc 
schools of his townshi]). lie farmed f<n' man\- years and owned one hundred 
sixtv acres of land, wluih he sold and came to l)c W itt. in September, 1908, 
and from that time on has gi\cn his entire attention to the buying and selling 
of horses and cattle, in which business he was formerly engaged in connection 
with his farming, lie also was engaged in stock feeding while on the farm, 
lie is one of the stockholders and directors of the Iowa State IJank at Lyons, 
Iowa. In politics he is a Democrat and was elected township clerk and later 
tax collector of Center townshi]). b^raternallw he is a member of the Odd 
l^^llows and of the Mt)dern Woodmen, lie and his wife are members of 
the Ltitheran church. 

Mr. Hanssen was married on l-ebruar\- 25, 1885. to Amelia Gradert, 
daughter of John (iradert. mentioned elsewhere in this work. To their union 
have been born five children: Walter, dead. Eugenia, dead. Irene, Florence 
and Clarence. 

Mr. Hanssen has prospered both in his farnn'ng and in stock dealing, and 
has ajjplied much practical business ability in his operations. He is popular 
and well liked among his neighbors, and has taken nuich interest in public 
affairs. 



KELLY BROTHERS. 



.\mong the important. thri\-ing and enter])rising manufacturing establish- 
ments of Clinton, that of l\ell\ Urothers takes high rank. In 1890 the 
Kelly hrothers. j. A.. W. J.. T. F. and P. H., organized the J. A. Kelly & 
Brothers Comjjany for the manufriclure of the Kelly comfort chair, daven- 
ports and upholstered furniture. The business started as a partnership, at 
Second avenue and Sixth street, and in i8<;j was incorporated as J. A. Kelly 
iK: I'.rothers .'ind built a factory at I'lfteenth street and Stockholm, employing 
about thirty-live men. It now employs ninety men and has graduallv in- 
creased its territor\' from the states of Illinois and Iowa to a national extent, 
nf)W selling all over the United States and doing iconic Inisiness in Cub'' and 
South .\merica. Of this company. J. A. Kelly is president; P. TT. Kellv, vice- 
president : T. !•". Kelly, secretary. :in<l W. J. Kelly, treasurer. 

The Kelly-Sorensen Company is owned and controlled bv the same 



CLINTON COUNT V, IOWA. 743 

people. It was organized in 1905 for the purpose of manufacturing chamber 
furnilnre. (h'essers, beds, commodes, dining room furniture, buffets, etc. Of 
this company. W . j. Kelly is president: j. A. Kelly, vice-president, and P. H. 
Kelly, secretary and treasurer. Both these companies are operated separate- 
ly, but employ the same traveling men. TIk' Kclly-Sorensen Company em- 
ploys almost as large a regular force as the older company, and has seventy- 
five men on its paxroUs. P)Oth companies economize by making a saving 
in cost of sales, in other ways than by employing the same road force. They 
often ship half-car loads for each, thus saxing the full hire of a car for each 
company. The companies have on the road five salaried men and twenty 
working on commission. The success of the firms has 1)een due to two 
things, the superior quality of their ])ro(lucts and the careful and economical 
management of the Kelly brothers, as evidenced in part by their combining 
largely the selling and shipping of the two companies. They are also \ery 
efficient in securing and keeping good salesmen. The two companies have 
had a steady, consistent growth, which if continued, as it bids fair to be, will 
soon bring their business to very large proportions. They ha\e been among 
the most successful of the Clinton manufacturing establishments. 



CECIL VINCENT CONNOLE, D. D. S. 

It may be that mtxlern conditions of living are responsible for the gen- 
eral poor condition of tlie teeth of most persons today; it may be that our 
ancestors had just as much trouble in the same way, but. lacking our facilities 
for relief and repair of those essential organs of the body, had to bear their 
miser}- unrelie\ed and took it as matter of course. Dentistry is a compara- 
tively modern profession and is makiii'^- ])rogress. The dentist who gradu- 
ated twenty years ago finds that the younger members of the profession can 
do things which were in his time believed impossible, and that teeth which 
the old time dentistr}- ruthlessly condemned are now sa\-ed, and the necessity 
for artificial teeth with which the earliest dentistry concerned itself, is largely 
being remoxed by repairing the remains of those which nature has gi\-en us. 
And while the profession is one which greatly lienefits the race, it also usually 
gives to the one who practices it a fair monetary reward. 

Cecil Vincent Connole was born in Clinton county. Iowa, January 14, 
1878, son of Thomas L. and I'idelia K (W'ampler) Connole. Thomas L. 
Connole was born in Jones county. Iowa, January 9. 1847. attended the public 



J44 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

schools and li;i> hccn in the grocery l)ii>iness for ahoiit thirty-five years, at 
which he has heen veiy successful. In politics he is a Democrat, and he and 
his wife and fann'ly arc Latholics. He was married to Fidelia Wam])ler. a 
native of Illinois, daujihter of Peter Wampler. who spent his last days in 
Illinois. 

Doctor Connole's paternal grandparents were Thomas and Hannah 
(Malone) Connole. hoth l)orn in Ireland. In 1840 Thomas Connole came to 
Dul)uc|ue. Iowa, and his wife ahout the same time. They were married in 
Boston. Massachusetts. They were the parents of ten children, four sons 
and three daughters. Thomas was a farmer nnd dicij ahout 1898 and his 
wife in 1905. They were members of the Catholic church. 

Cecil Connole grew up in De Witt, attended the public, high and 
parochial schools there, and took a classical course at St. Mary's, Kansas, and 
graduated from the Chicago College of Dental Surgery in 190 1. After grad- 
uation he practiced in Chicago for about six months, then came to De A\'^itt 
to practice, and has had a ver)- successful practice here. He is a member 
of the Iowa State Dental Society and of the Chicago Dental Society. In 
politics he is an independent voter. He and his family are meinbers of the 
Catholic church. 

Dr. Connole was married on October T2. 1909. to Dolorosa Schneider, 
who was born in Lyons, Iowa, daughter of John H. and Hannah (Redden) 
Schneider. Her father was born in New- York, her mother in Iowa, and they 
are still residents of Lyons. Iowa. 

Doctor Connole is a man w^ho. by the agreeableness of his nature, has 
made many friends. His professional success has been good, and he stands 
well in dental circles. He is progressive and u])-to-date in all matters and 
takes much interest in the development of the communitv. 



REV. JOH.\N.\S T. HF.IE. 

.\ large amount of good has been accomplished by the Rev. Johanas I. 
Heie. who is both a .successful expounder of the gospel of the Mazarene and 
also a business man of no small caliber. He is a persistent, conscientious 
and able worker in all the relations of life and has .shown what self-reliance, 
courage and right principles can accomplish, although in the face of seeming- 
ly insurmountable obstacles. He was born near Rurgeu, Xorwav. in t8:;i, 
and is the son of Johanas and Christa C Nelson) Heie. both natives of Nor- 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 






Ki^-iV'. LENOX, AND 

TTTlvr.N 1-OlNDATIONS '[ 

R I' i 




JOHANAS J. HEIE 




MRS. BliRIUANNA HEIE 







MO x 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 745 

way, in which country they spent their hves, both being now deceased. The 
father was a famier and his family consisted of seven children. 

Johanas J. Heie hved on the home farm until he was fifteen years of age 
and attended the public schools under the supervision of the church. Then 
he went to the citv of Burgen, where he worked during the day and attended 
night school. Later he went to Christiansund. a city nortli of Rurgen. in 
1874, and there clerked in a store one year, then emigrated to America, locat- 
ing in Story county. Towa, where he worked at various things for one year, 
then moved to Decora, this state, and there attended the Lutheran College 
for a period of four vears and left that institution in 1877. Lie eng'iged in 
teaching for one rear, later went to Tennessee, and subsec|uently to Indiana, 
then returned to Iowa, and finally went to IMinnesota. In 1885 he entered 
the Theological Seminary at the Capital L^niversity. Columbus, Ohio, from 
which institution he was graduated after a three-years course. lie l)egan his 
regular work as pastor at Dwight. Richland county. North Dakota, and re- 
mained there six vears, then went to Fargo, that state, where he remained 
four vears. then he went to the Pacific coast and preached at Portland. Ore- 
gon, for three and one-half years, and in tqoo he came to his present loca- 
tion, and has since been pastor of the church southeast of Calamus in Olive 
township, Clinton county. He also operates one hundred and sixty acres of 
land, which he owns here, and he'*lias charge of forty acres which belongs to 
the parsonage. He carries on general farming in a very successful manner. 
As a minister he has done a great work wherever he has been called, strength- 
ening and building up tlie congregations which he has ser\-ed. and he is an 
earnest, forceful and faithful expounder of the gospel, being a profound 
student and carefully educated. 

Rev. Mr. Heie was married on ]\Iarch 15. t88o. to BeTthanna John.son, 
a native of Clinton county, born and reared in this locality and educated here. 
She is the daughter of George and Bertha (Christensen) Johnson, early set- 
tlers in Clinton county, having come here from Norway about 1853. the father 
becoming an extensive farmer here. There were eleven children born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Johnson: John D., Berthanna. Christian. Elizabeth. Christanna, 
Bertha AI. (deceased), Bertha Margaret, George, Marie. Lea (deceased). 
Christian. To Rev. and ^Irs. Heie there were six children born : Hjalmar. 
Leanora. Sigurd. Swanhild, Frithgof and Johan. all being deceased, except 
Frith go f. 

Politically. Re\'. ^Ir. Heie is a Republican, but is lilicval in his views. 
He takes an abiding interest in whatever tends to promote the general good 
of his communitv and countv and he is always on the right side of everv 



y^(y CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

public and mural question, lie is one of the most influential men in the west- 
ern portion of the county and is eminently deserving of the confidence and 
esteem that are freely accorded him. He is obliging, genial, hospitable and a 
man who lakes a great deal of interest in young people and advocates a clean, 
wholesome life. 



GUSTAV A. HORSTMAXX. 

A splendid example of the modern agriculturist is to be found in Gustav 
A. Ilorstmann. of the vicinity of Toronto, Liberty township, Clinton county, 
a man who hokls high rank among the progressixe citizens of the community 
in which he resides and whose interests he has ever had at heart and sought 
to promote in whatever manner possible, fur he realized the duties of true 
citizens early in life and has never shirked his duties in this connection, well 
knowing that to promote the general good meant also the advancement of his 
individual interests. 

Mr. ilorstmann was born in Cedar county, Iowa, on July 14, 1868, and 
he is the son of Frederick and Dorothy Ilorstmann. the father a native of 
Holstein, Germany, his birth having occurred on December 30, 1836; the 
mother was also born in Germany, on April 27, 1844. There they grew to 
maturity and were educated in the common schools. The father emigrated 
to the United States in 1866, coming west to Cedar county, Iowa, later moving 
to Scott county, lie was a man of thrift and in due course of time became 
well established in tlie land of his adoption. His family consisted of five 
children, four of whom are living. Frederick Horstmann farmed until 1891, 
in which year he moved to Wheatland and there spent the remainder of his 
days, his birth occurring on July 3, 1909. and that of his wife on November 
II. 1 90 1. He was a very successful fanner and business man, and owned 
a fine farm of two hundred and forty acres. He started in life with practical- 
ly nothing, but he was a man of indomitable courage and succeeded by his 
own efforts. Owing to his exemplar}' life, lie had the good will of all who 
knew him In i)ulitics he was a Democrat and was at one time justice of the 
peace, holding this office in a \erv creditable manner for a nnnilier of years; 
he was also schocjl director for a number of years. 

Gustav A. Horstmrnm was reared on the home farm, and when but a 
lad he was put to work in the fields, assisting with the cro])s during the 
summer months and attending tlie public schools in the winter time. He 
took up farming as a life work and has been \ery successful, now owning 



CLINTON COUNTV, IOWA. 747 

two huiiilrcd and toity aero, well iinproNcd in e\ery respect and under a 
hig;h state of cultixation. on which stand a beautifully located and cozy dwell- 
ing and a si)lcndi(l gmup n\ outbuildings, in the midst of forest and fruit 
trees. On the place may be seen at all seasons various grades of good live 
stock which form no small part of his annual income, for he understands 
well the handling of stock and their raising and marketing. This is the old 
homestead, which lie has taken a tlelight in keeping up as did his worth)' 
father l:efore him. carrxing on general farming in a manner that stamps him 
as a worthy son of a worthy sire. 

Politically. Mr. 1 lorstmann is a Democrat, and he has Ijeen one of the 
trustees of Liberty township for the past twelve years: he is now holding the 
otifice of secretary of the local school board, having tilled this position with 
satisfaction for the past six years, taking an abiding interest in educational and 
all local affairs and ready at all times to do his full share in promoting 
the general good. 

Mr. 1 lorstmann was married in 1891 to Alwiene Bielfeldt, a natixe of 
Germany and the daughter of Jocum and Maria (Alwiene) Bielfeldt. who 
emigrated to Clinton county. Iowa, in an early day. the father dying at Wheat- 
land in 1902; the mother survives, and is making her home in Davenport, 
Iowa. They were always very highly respected wherever they cast their lot, 
being people of industr}^ and honesty. To 'Sir. and Mrs. Horstmann four 
children have been born. Fred. Walter. Lillie and Leonard. The Horstmann 
family has always stood high in the social life of Liberty township. 



GEORGE WILLLVM DULANY. JR. 

The chief characteristics of George William Dulany, Jr.. a prominent 
business man of Clinton, Iowa, seem to be keenness of perce])tion. a tireless 
energy, honesty of purpose and motive and everyday common sense, which 
have enabled him not only to advance his own interests. l)ut also to contrib.ute 
to the moral and material advancement of the community. 

Mr. Dulany was born in Ft. Scott. Kansas. July 1 1. 1877, and he is the 
son of George William antl Fannie (W'illiams) Dulany. They were both 
born in Missouri and were married in Ft. Scott. Kansas, whither the elder 
Dulany had gone when but a xoung man for the ])urpose of engaging in the 
retail lumlier business, and Fannie \\'illiams had accc^mpanied her parents 
there when a young girl. Remaining in Ft. Scott a few years, these parents 



J4.S CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

returned to liannilKil. Missouri, where Mr. Dulany continued to engage in the 
lumber business and where they still reside. He has been associated 
with his father in the lumber business since before the Civil war. the father, 
\V. H. Dulanv. having l^een born in Howard county, Missouri, in 1818, his 
parents, the great-grandparents of the subject, having had the distinction of 
coming to Missouri with the Daniel Boone party in the early pioneer days. 
These two gentlemen, father and son. with the grandfathers brothers, en- 
gaged in the lumber business in- Hannibal very extensively in the early days, 
this citv having been for many years the distributing point for Missouri, Iowa 
and Nebraska and the Middle West. The timber and lumber were shipped 
down from the north, principally towed on the ^Mississippi river, and many 
millions of feet of the same passed the city of Clinton en route to Hannibal. 
Meml)ers of this family in the meantime iDecame identified with the mills in 
Wisconsin, Minnesota. Arkansas, Louisiana, Texas and Washington. \\'hile 
the family still live in Hannibal, they have not conducted any active business 
there since 1898. They became known throughout the Mississippi valley in 
connection with the lumber business and became prosperous in this line. 

In 1894, George W. Dulany, Jr.. of this review, organized in Minneapo- 
lis, Minnesota, the Eclipse Lumber Company, where the general offices were 
maintained until June i. 1910. when they moved them to Clinton. Iowa, mak- 
ing the main office nearer the branch offices, which are located in Iowa and 
southern Minnesota. The Dulany s also purchased the old and well estab- 
lished lumber interests here of C. Lamb & Sons, held at that time by Ingwer- 
sen-Borbeck & Company. 

George W. Dulany, Jr.. was educated in the public schools of Hannibal, 
Missouri, later attended Phillips Academy at Andover, Massachusetts, and 
finally Yale University, from which institution he was graduated in 1898. 

Young Dulany enlisted in the United States navy and served with much 
credit on the "Minne.sota" during the war with Spain. The "Minnesota" did 
princii)ally patrol duty as a part of the north Atlantic .squadron, defending the 
coast of New England. He enlisted as common .seaman and rose to the rank 
of second class (juartermaster. In 1899 he entered the employ of the Empire 
Lumber Company, building for them a railway through the woods of north- 
ern Wisconsin. He was next engaged in the lumber and grain business at 
Winona. Minnesota, until 1903, when he moved to Minneapolis and shortly 
afterwards organized the Eclipse Lumber Company, rdreadv mentioned. 

Mr. Dulany seems to have inherited his business genius from his ante- 
cedents and. judging by the splendid record lu- lias made in the past, the fu- 
ture holds much of promise in his chosen field of endeavor. He has rare 



CLINTOX COUNTY, IOWA. 749 

foresight, analytical abilit) and is In- nalnre an organizer and proniotor and 
he is a man of straightforward principles and persistent energ}\ Personally 
he is a good mixer, unassuming, genial and uniformly courteous. 

Until recent years the Dulanys were Democrats, but now the subject is 
independent, preferring to xote for the man whom he deems most worthy of 
the office sought, rather tlian for the party. Fraternally he belongs to the 
Winona Consistory, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and the Ancient 
Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He also belonged to a college 
fraternity, and he is a member of the Sons of the American Revolution, some 
of his ancestors having fought in the patriot army. 

Mr. Dulany was married on August 25, 1901. to Catherine McDonnell, 
a lady of culture and refinement and the representative of a prominent old 
family of Evanston. Illinois. This union has been graced by the birth of one 
son. George \\'illiam, the third. 



FRED \V. MrrCHELL. 

The editor of a country paper, to properly fill his position, must he a man 
whose wisdom should exceed that of Solomon. He must he able to discuss 
all the leading questions of the day ; e(iually shoidd know how to cure ailing 
poultry or to prescribe for freckles. The work of liis paper is not sj^ecialized 
as is that of the city paper and the editor must bear the greater burden, soine- 
times combining the functions of reporter, editor, compositor and pressman. 
His mission is to keep the citizens of the community informed of the doings 
of each other and of the outside world, but pre-eminently to assist, in all 
the ways in which he can. the development of that community. He must 
possess marked i^ublic spirit, and country journalists have. b\' persistent 
advocacy, done more for the adxanccment of the rural communities than 
have the members of any other profession. 

Fred A\'. Mitchell was born at Savanna. Illinois. April 6. 1877, son of 
the Rev. C. H. and Lottie (Henderson) Mitchell. C. H. Mitchell was horn 
in Tndirma in 1846. and his wife was born in Illinois in 1848. Fie attended 
the public schools and gt"aduated froin Monmouth College at Monmouth, 
Illinois, taking his theological course at Xenia Seminary. Xenia. Ohio. He 
was then ordained a United Presbyterian minister and has seiwed as pa.stor 
in many charges. He is now residing at Golden. Illinois. Of his four sons 
and two daughters, all are living. During the Civil war he enlisted in the 



750 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

hundrcd-davs service and is now a niemljer of the Grand Arniv. Three 
nt his hrothers were in the army and one of them was killed, W^illiam 
survivinij. l-'red Mitehell's paternal grandfather was Dr. William Mitchell, 
a native <>\ Pennsylvania who came to Ohio and later moved to Indiana, and 
then to Illinois, dving at Monnioiuh. The maternal grandfather was William 
Henderson, an earlv settler of Illinois, where he and his wife died. All were 
men and women of much worth and highly respected, and his father was a 
pastor of aiiility and power. 

I'red W. Mitchell was educated in the high school at Keota. Iowa, and 
at Lewis Institute. Chicago, at which time he was a reporter on the Ti)iics- 
Hcrald. He early showed a hent for newsi)aper work, first learning the 
printer's trade at Washington. lo\va. and w hen eighteen he started a paper at 
Hanover. Illinois. He was in nc\\s])a])cr work in the City of Mexico for five 
years after graduation, then came back to the States and was engaged at 
Desmon. Iowa, Cedar Rapids. Iowa, and Clay Center. Kansas, and then 
was for a time at Chicago. He came to De Witt and bought the Dc JJ'ift 
Observer on October i. 1907. of which lie has since been tlie proprietor. He 
has greatly enlarged the scope of the paper and has brought it up to its present 
high standard. In politics he is a Repul}lican. 

On October 2(S, 1907. Mr. Mitchell was married to Florence Kay. of 
Clay Center. Kansas. Mr. Mitchell has had wide experience in his profession 
and is the proprietor of a paper wdiich is a credit to the county and which 
exerts much influence. Personally, he is an agreeable and affable man and 
has manv friends. 



J. C. CONRAD & SONS. 

One does not ha\e to carry his investigations far into the business and 
commercial life of the city of Clinton. Iowa, to ascertain that the firm of 
J. ( . ( oiuad iH: .Sons is one of the leading grocery stores of Clinton county 
and that the gentlemen under whose able management it has grown to its 
present large proportions are men of twentieth-century ideas, alert, aggressive 
and honorable in all the relations of life. The sons of J. C. Conrad — Charles 
C. and Harold P.. of whi-ni this .sketch more ])articularly treats — are of that 
class of young men who would win in life's struggle under anv environment. 

Charles C. Conrad was l)orn in Lansing. Iowa. May 4. 1877. the son of 
John C. Conrad, who was born in 1843 in New ^'ork state, and there he grew 
u|) r-nd was educated and when still a young man emigrated to Minnesota. 



CLINTON COUNTY. IOWA. 751 

While there the Civil war broke out and he enlisted in Company 1, of the fa- 
mous First X'olunteer Infantry. Minnesota Volunteers, and he ])r()ve<l to he a 
very gallant defender of the stars and stripes, having reached the rank of 
sergeant when mustered out. He was a machinist by trade and after his mar- 
riage he moved to Lansing. Iowa. then, in 1880, came to Clinton and started 
a grocery store the following year on the same plot of ground where the firm 
grocery now stands, at Xos. 412-414 Xorth Second street. He gradually 
built up a very large business, in fact, the prestige of this store has for thirty 
years l^een too well known throughout the county to need commenting on. At 
that time this particular section of the city was all open country, with neither 
buildings or trees. Here the father, John C, conducted his grocery until his 
death and as his sons grew up they took the active management of the store. 
For many years before his death the elder Conrad left the management of his 
store to his sons and he very faithfully performed the duties of foreman at 
Lamb's machine shop for a number of years. He was accidentally injured 
while working there, and it is probable that this resulted eventually in his 
death in igo8. He was an excellent business man and of a friendly disposi- 
tion, made friends easily and always retained them. He was a member of 
St. Patrick's Catholic church and his family also belongs to this congregation. 
The family of John C. Conrad consisted of four children, namely : 
Charles C. and Harold F., mentioned above as conducting the grocery of this 
name: Mrs. Harry Ordway, of Clinton; George H., who is now deceased, 
worked in the People's Trust & Savings Bank at Clinton. 

Charles C. Conrad was educated in the public schools of Clinton and 
before and after school hours he worked in his father's grocery — in fact, he 
grew up in the business and was familiar with its every detail when quite 
young. In 1904 he went into partnership with his brother, Harold F., in the 
management of the grocery under the name of J. C. Conrad & Sons. This 
store has the reputation of being the oldest, largest and best equipped gro- 
cery in Clinton and a \ er\- large and satisfactoiy trade is carried on here at all 
seasons. The store is always well stocked and is kept neat and attractive. 
Charles C. Conrad is a member of the P>rotherhood of Railway Train- 
men. Fraternal Order of Fagles, Mutual Benefit Association, Royal Arcanum 
and the Ben Hur Society. He stands high in fraternal circles and he is a 
faithful member of the Catholic church. 

Charles C. Conrad married, on July 4. 1004. Sophia Zaiser, who was 
born in Clinton, Iowa, the daughter of William Zaiser, a printer by trade 
and one of the early settlers of Lyons, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Conrad have no 
children. 



752 



CLIXTOX COUXTY, IOWA. 



Harold F. Conrad was born March 23. 1881, in Clinton. Iowa, and was 
educated in the public schools here. When fifteen years of age he entered a 
printing office and learned the pressman's trade. He worked in the Journal 
office at Clinton and in other offices in various cities, having become a veiy 
efficient man in his line so that his services were in demand. He had the repu- 
tation of Ijeing verv rapid. But tiring of the somewhat monotonous life in a 
printing office and seeing a better opportunity to advance himself in the gro- 
cery business, he formed a partnership with his brother, Charles C. in 1904, 
under the firm name of J. C. Conrad & Sons, and he has been very successful 
in this line of endeavor, his pleasing manners and his uniform courtesy and 
consideration rendering him popular with customers and has increased the 
general prestige of the store. 



MARTIN C. SOEXKSEX. 

The subject of this review is a gentleman of high standing among the 
citizens of Olive township, where is situated part of his valuable landed es- 
tate, and to him has not been denied a full measure of success, having long 
been a recognized factor of importance in connection with the agricultural 
interests of the county. Like a large number of the thrifty citizens of Clin- 
ton countv. Mr. Soenksen is of Germanic stock and birth. l)ut has spent most 
of his active and useful life within the borders of the great Hawkeye com- 
monwealth. 

Martin C. Soenksen was born in Germany in 1858. and he is the son of 
Brodcr Soenksen and vife. mention of whom is made under the caption on 
Christ Soenkseni. in another part of this work. IMartin Soenksen remained 
in his native land until he was fourteen years of age and attended school 
there. He then came to the United States and settled in Center township, 
Clinton county. Iowa, where he continued to go to school until he received 
a very good education. He grew up on a farm which he wttrked during his 
youth and he has always followed agricultural pursuits, and, being a hard 
worker and a good manager, he has hem very amply rewarded and is now the 
owner of a well improved and productive farm of one hundred and eightv 
acres in Olive township, this county, where he has lived the past eleven years 
and wlicre he has a pleasant home. He also owns one hundred and sixty acres 
of valuable land in Oklahoma. He has put on most of the later improvements 
on the place where he now resides, and carries on general farming and stock 



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akV 'XOX'll 'HOIST 










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CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 753 

raising, giving practically all his attention to the proper tilling of the soil and 
the care and disposition of the harvests from the same. 

Air. Soenksen was married in 1880 to Augusta Clausen, who was born 
in Clinton county. Iowa, and is the daughter of John F. and Mary (Leveson) 
Clausen. Mary Leveson's father was a very early settler in Clinton county. 
Mrs. Soenksen was reared and educated in this county; both her parents are 
still living in Miles, Jackson county, Iowa. The following children have 
been born to Mr. and Mrs. Soenksen : Bernhard, Mary, Anna, Johnnie. 
Henry, Erwin, Malinda, Selma, Hilda and Arnold. All these children are 
living at home with the exception of Mary and Anna, who reside in Cali- 
fornia. 

Mr. Soenksen and family are members of the Lutheran church, and 
politically Mr. Soenksen is a Democrat in national affairs, l)ut independent 
in local affairs, preferring to vote for the man whom he believes is best 
fitted to hold the ofifice sought. He himself has been contented to lead a 
quiet life on his farm, not aspiring to public offices, although doubtless well 
qualified to ably and faithfully discharge the duties of any of the local offices. 



FRED RIXON. 



The prominent business man of w'hom it is the privilege of the biographer 
to wn-ite in this connection is at the head of one of the leading manufacturing 
enterprises of its kind in Towa, and for this reason his name has become 
widely known in the business circles of this and other states of the North. 
Northwest and Southwest. Since locating at Clinton he has done much to 
promote the material prosperity of the city through the medium of his busi- 
ness, and as a man and citizen he has l>een equally influential in advancing 
the social and rural interests of the community. Fred Rixon is a native of 
northern Germany and the son of H. C. and Analie (Lund) Rixon. These 
parents reared their family in the fatherland, and lived near their native place 
until 1882, when they came to America and located in Chicago. In his native 
country H. C. Rixon had been a merchant, but after coming to the United 
States he spent the remainder of his life in retirement, dying in the year 1905, 
his wife following him to the grave in 1907. Of his family of six sons and 
three daughters, four of the former and all of the latter are living. 

Fred Rixon was born Octol>er 18, 1855, received a collegiate education 
in his native land, and in 1871 he came to the United States and spent the 
(48) 



754 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 



ensuing two years in Chicago. Leaving that city in 1873, he located at Clin- 
ton, Iowa, and accepted a clerkship in a store, in which capacity he continued 
until 1 88 1, when he engaged in the retail clothing business for himself. After 
ten years in that line of merchandise, he added a large stock of boots and 
shoes, and during the next few years built up an extensive and lucrative pat- 
ronage, and established an honorable reputation as an enterprising, judicious 
and far-seeing business man. In the meantime, 1902, he formed a partner- 
ship with W. A. Edwards for the manufacture of ladies' petticoats and other 
garments, which enterprise grew so rapidly during the three years following, 
that in 1905 he sold his store, the better to devote his entire attention to his 
manufacturing interests. 

Messrs. Rixon & Edwards started their factory with eight machines, but 
the demand for the product was such that it was found necessary to increase 
the capacitv of the plant from time to time, until there are now one hundred 
and thirty-five machines in operation, turning out about one hundred thou- 
sand garments annually, which find their chief markets in the states of Iowa, 
Illinois, Wisconsin. Kansas. Oklahoma. Missouri and the Dakotas. The com- 
pany at the present time manufactures eighty-five different kinds of garments, 
which include two hundred and fifty styles in silks, satins, ginghams, muslins. 
etc.. the business requiring the services of from one hundred to one hundred 
and twenty-five employes, exclusive of traveling salesmen, who vary in number 
from six to ten. The superior quality of all the product has created a demand 
w^hich taxes the plant to the utmost to supply and, judging from the recent 
rapid growth of the business, the proprietors are now considering the advisa- 
bility of a still further enlargement of its capacity. Mr. Edwards dying in 
February, 1909, Mr. Rixon purchased his interest, and since that time has been 
virtually sole proprietor of the establishment, although in August of the year 
indicated, his son, Fred, Jr., became identified with the concern and is now 
vice-president of the same. 

The gro\\i:h of this far-reaching enterprise has been almost phenomenal, 
the chief reason for which is the high reputation of the product, the different 
lines being considered the best of the kind wherever sold. Mr. Rixon has 
aimed to furnish nothing but first-class goods to the trade, and that he has 
succeeded in this laudable desire is amply demonstrated by the large orders 
which are constantly coming from all parts of the country, and which, as 
already indicated, he sometimes experiences considerable difficulty in filling. 
During the past year (1909) the plant almost, if not quite, doubled its ca- 
pacity, judging from which, it is easy to predict a business of greatly enlarged 
proportions in the future and an establishment which will become one of the 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 755 

greatest of the kind in the West. Mr. Rixon is a very careful and methodical 
man. who is familiar with every phase of his business, and keeps in close touch 
with the trade. To his sound judgment and superior executive ability the city 
of Clinton is indebted for one of its leading enterprises and, as stated in a 
preceding paragraph, he has not been unmindful of the city's welfare in other 
than a material way. being interested in its social and moral advancement and 
readv at all times to lend his assistance and influence to further all laudable, 
charitable and humanitarian projects. In politics, Mr. Rixon votes the Re- 
publican ticket, but is not a partisan, much less an aspirant for office or 
public recognition, and in religion he was reared under the influence of the 
Lutheran church, to the teachings of which he has always inclined. 

Mr. Rixon was married on the first day of May, 1881, to Margaret D. 
Diercks, daughter of Peter Diercks. one of the wealthy farmers and promi- 
nent German-American citizens of Clinton county. Mr. and Mrs. Rixon are 
the parents of two children, Fred, Jr., and Irene. The former was edu- 
cated in the common schools and Sternman's Institute, at Dixon, Illinois, and 
is now associated wath his father in the latter's manufacturing interests, being 
vice-president of the company of which his father is president. After being 
graduated from the Clinton high school, Irene entered Downer's College, in 
Milwaukee, where she earned an honorable record as an industrious and 
painstaking student. Both son and daughter are intelligent and cultured and 
move in the best social circles of the city, being popular among all with whom 
thev mingle. The Rixons are among the best known and most highly es- 
teemed families of Clinton, and since moving to the city have filled a large 
place socially and in the public eye. 



MATHIAS M. THUSEN AND PETER M. THUSEN. 

The gentlemen whose names appear above, lirothers in partnership in the 
grocery business under the firm name of 'M. Thusen & Company, at No. 319 
North Fourth street, Clinton, Iowa, are too well known in local business cir- 
cles to need anv extensive comment here, for they have long maintained one 
of the leading stores in this vicinity. 

Mathias M. Thusen was born in the country just south of Denmark, 
known as Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, August 25, 1856, and is of Danish 
descent, that part of Germany having at the time of his birth been a part of 
Denmark. His parents were Mathias and Christina (Thusen) Matesen. The 



7^6 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

children took their mother's maiden name through some pecuHarity of the 
German law when North Schleswig changed from a province of Denmark to 
a province of Germany. The parents lived on a farm and died in the old 

country. 

]\rathias M. Thusen received a text-book training equivalent to a common 
school education in this country, and when seventeen years old he emigrated 
to north Denmark proper, and there he worked as a laborer on farms. When 
twenty years of age he entered the Danish army, in which he served nine 
months, the army not being engaged in war at that time. When twenty-four 
years of age he came to the United States and located at Clinton, Iowa, where 
he first worked a year in a saw mill, then for a period of six years he clerked 
in a flour and feed store, thus learning the details of the mercantile business, 
at which he has so admirably succeeded in later years. In 1889 he and his 
brother, Peter M., formed a partnership and entered the grocery business at 
No. 319 North Fourth street, in the Danish Society building, and since that 
time they have been continuously engaged in business at this place, gradually 
enlarging their stock and becoming more prosperous as the years went by, 
gaining in prestige and popularity by their courteous treatment of all cus- 
tomers and their honest dealings. They have always maintained a first-class, 
neat and carefully stocked store, which is always a very busy place. They 
have a very extensive trade among the Danish Germans, as well as others. 

Mathias M. Thusen is a member of the Danish Lutheran church and is 
a Democrat in politics. He married Marie Kair on December 5, 1885. She 
came from the same district of Germany as did Mr. Thusen and is a lady of 
refined tastes. Three children have been born to this union, Johanna, Mathias, 
Jr.. and Christian. 

Peter M. Thusen, mentioned above as brother and partner of Mathias M. 
Thusen, was born December 29. 1861, in north Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. 
He worked on a farm until twenty years old and in 1881, having completed 
his education in the home country and ready to start life for himself, he came 
to America, direct to Clinton, Towa. He first found employment in a saw 
mill, tlien worked three years for Thompson & Coan, and finally, in 1889, 
went into partnership with his 1)rother, Mathias M., in the grocery business 
and has done his full share of the work and management of this successful 
enterprise. 

Peter M. Thusen was married to Anna Kair, who was born on September 
14. 1864. She was a sister of the wife of Mathias M. Thusen and she came 
to Clinton, low-a. in 1881, a month after the arrival of Peter M. Thusen. She 
is a woman of good taste and of a good family. They have two children, 
Christian and Marie. 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 757 

Peter M. Thusen is a Republican in politics and a member of the Danish 
Lutheran church. Both he and his brother are influential in the church and 
local societies of their friends and their nationality, for they have always been 
known as honest, industrious citizens. 



WILLIAM W. MESSER. 

Among the strong and influential citizens of Clinton county the record 
of whose lives have become an essential part of the history of this section, 
the gentleman whose name appears above occupies a prominent place, and for 
years he has exerted a beneficial influence in the city where he resides and the 
interest of which he has ever had at heart, always manifesting a willingness to 
do his full share as a public spirited citizen in furthering any movement look- 
ing to the general good. 

William W. Messer was born in Clinton, Iowa, June 21, 1858, and is 
the son of Oliver and Harriet H. Messer, both natives of the state of New 
Hampshire and each representing sterling old New England families. In 
1856 they emigrated west arid located in Clinton, Iowa. The elder Messer 
was general fuel agent and tie inspector for the Chicago Northwestern Rail- 
road Company. Later he became superintendent of the local gas and water 
works, a position which he very ably filled for a period of twenty years, finally 
retiring, and his death occurred in 1903. He was an influential man in local 
affairs and was a member of the school board for a number of years. He 
never sought public office, preferring to lead a quiet life. His widow sur- 
vived him until December 25, 1909. They had but one child, William W., of 
this review. 

The subject of this sketch was educated in the public schools of Clinton 
and, applying himself very closely to his text books, received a verv service- 
able education. He began assisting his father in his work when but a small 
boy, and for a period of twenty years he was assistant superintendent of the 
city gas and water works, being associated all the while with his father in the 
work. During that time he was interested in a farm north of Lyons, although 
he continued to live in Clinton. He was also interested in other business af- 
fairs, having formed a partnership with E. G. Fenlon in the coal, wood, grain, 
feed and implement business for a period of three years. He then fanned 
again three or four years and in 1907 formed a partnership with William 
Parks in the storage and transfer business, also a commission business. This 



758 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

partnership still exists and they have been very successful in the same. Mr. 
Messer is now the owner of a well improved and very valuable farm in Clin- 
ton countv. on the outskirts of the city, on which general farming is carried 
on. The place consists of three hundred and sixty-five acres, and it will rank 
with the model farms of the county in every respect. 

Politically. Mr. Messer is a Democrat and, while he takes much more 
than a passing interest in political matters, he is no office seeker. Mrs. Messer 
is a member of the Congregational church. 

Mr. Messer was married in 1888 to Marie Hobein, a native of Lyons, 
Iowa, where she was reared and educated and where her family has long been 
prominent. This union has resulted in the birth of two children, namely : 
Oliver L , who is a graduate of the Clinton high school, and Clarence W., who 
is a student in the local public schools. 

Leonard Hobein, father of Mrs. Messer, was born in Braunschweig, Ger- 
many, February 19, 1820. His wife, Anna Maria (Racho) Hobein, was born 
September 8. 1830, in Strelitz, Mecklenburg, Germany. They were married 
in 1854, came to the United States that year and settled in Lyons, Iowa. The 
father died on September 16, 1893, ^^ the age of seventy-three. The wife sur- 
vives him and is still living in the old home, at the age of eighty years. 



CHARLES E. McMAHON. 

The picturesque days of the steamboats and rivermen of a generation ago 
have about vanished, at least the general "atmosphere" about them seems to 
"have undergone a change, and many who a few decades ago folloAved the 
river have turned their attention to other things. Although the spectator 
today sees craft of all kinds on the bosom of the mighty "father of waters." 
the scene is different from the old days ; one cannot explain the difference, but 
it exists nevertheless, and a certain glory has departed, like lost youth, never 
to come again. One of the sterling and interesting characters of Clinton 
county whose early life was given to service on the river is Charles E. Mc- 
Mahon, who can tell many interesting stories of life as it was in the old days 
on the Mississippi. He was born at Albany, Illinois. September 3, i860, and 
is the son of Abner and Ruth (William) McMahon, the father born in Ohio 
and the mother in Whiteside county. Illinois, to which county the father came 
when a child with his parents. He was a steamboat pilot for many years on 
the Mississippi river. He met death in a tragic manner, being murdered on 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 759 

July 4, 1868, at Reeds Landing', Minnesota. He was regarded as one of the 
best pilots on the ri\er. His family consisted of three sons and one daughter, 
all living. The mother died in 1875. 

Charles E. McMahon, of this review, received his education in the public 
schools of Albany and Dixon, Illinois, also attending a business college. He 
went on the river as a wood passer when very young, and then became mate 
and pilot and later became captain for C. F. Alden, remaining as such until 
1891, when he married. He had made an excellent record on the river and had 
become widely known all along the Mississippi, where he had worked so long. 
His next work was for the Clinton Bridge & Iron Works and was general 
foreman for thirteen years, giving excellent service. He then went to work 
for the Iowa Telephone Company, and worked for the bridge and iron works 
during the winter. He began work in 1899 ^"^r the Iowa Telephone Company 
as ground man. then as lineman. He has been inspector and manager since 
January i, 1910, filling this responsible position in a manner that has won 
the approval of all concerned. 

Politically, Mr. McMahon is a Republican. He has been a member of 
the board of education for nine years, holding the office three terms. Fra- 
ternally, he belongs to the Masons, having taken all the degrees of the Scot- 
tish Rite of Free Masons. He is also prominent in the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. 

Mr. McMahon was married in November, 1889, to Malinda Stark, a 
nati\'e of Camanche, Iowa. This union has resulted in the birth of four chil- 
dren, namely: Bessie graduated from the Clinton high school; Florence is 
also a high school graduate ; Thera is deceased ; Myrta is attending the pub- 
lic schools. 



WILLIAM REDDEN. 



The name of William Redden holds a high rank among the business men 
of Clinton county. He is a man who would win his way in any locality where 
fate might place him, for he has sound judgment, coupled with great energy 
and business tact, together with upright principles, all of which make for suc- 
cess wherever they are rightly applied, if persisted in, and by reason of the 
exercise of these principles he has not only won business success but also the 
confidence and good will of his fellow men. 

Mr. Redden was born in Clinton, Iowa, October 16, 1873, and he is the 
son of Michael and Elizabeth (McCarthy) Redden, the father born in county 
Tipperary, Ireland, in 1845, ^"^1 the latter born in Wicklow, Ireland, in 1844. 



760 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

The father was a laborer and when a young man he came to Clinton, Iowa, 
from Ireland ; he was an honest man and a hard worker and found ready em- 
ployment here. His family consisted of four sons, Matthew, Andrew, Wil- 
liam and Ambrose. 

William Redden was educated in the parochial schools of Clinton, and 
when but a small lad he determined upon a mercantile course, and after leav- 
ing school he began clerking in the retail shoe store of Kief & Clancy, learning 
here the "ins and outs" of this business thoroughly. He remained with the 
same firm for a period of ten years, giving the utmost satisfaction and prov- 
ing an excellent employe owing to his promptness, his aptness and his cour- 
tesy to customers. He could always be relied upon. In 1900 Mr. Redden 
and Mr. Donlan, the latter also a clerk at the Kief & Clancy shoe store, started 
in a retail shoe store of their own under the firm name of Redden & Donlan, 
located on Second street. In 1906, they moved to No. 215 Fifth avenue, and 
there they still maintain one of the most popular and best stocked stores in 
the city. They started in business on a small scale and were compelled to 
work up the trade, but both being young men of unblemished reputation and 
of indomitable energy, they succeeded admirably well and now their place of 
business is known throughout the county and well patronized by both the peo- 
ple of the rural districts and from Clinton and Lyons. 

Mr. Redden and all his family are earnest members of the Catholic 
church. 

On February 15, 1909, Mr. Redden married Flora Herrin. a native of 
Ohio, born in 1885. She is the daughter of Francis and Agnes Herrin. an 
excellent family of the Buckeye state. One child, Joseph, was born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Redden on December 8, 1909. 



MICHAEL THIEL. 



One of the thrifty and modern twentieth-century farmers in the ^'icinity 
of Calamus, Clinton county, is Michael Thiel. who, as his name would indi- 
cate, is a native of that great empire across the sea from w^hemce so manv of 
our best and most progressive citizens, especially of the agricultural classes, 
have come — Germany — and judging from the splendid appearance of his 
place he has not only inherited, but brought into actual practice, the winning 
characteristics usually attributed to the Germanic race. His birth occurred 
in the fatherland on March 12, 1857. and he is the son of John and Margaret 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 761 

(Wingender) Thiel, both natives of Gennany. There the mother died in 
1892 and on December 5, 1893, ^"''^ father came to CHnton, Iowa, where he 
lived until his death, in 190T. They were the parents of five children, two 
of whom are living; two died in Germany and one after the family came to 
America. Two are now hving in Iowa, John, of Scott county, and Michael, 
of this review\ The father was a farmer and he had a very comfortable 
home. He was ninety years old wheri he crossed the ocean, accompanied by 
his son, John. Hale and hearty, he never experienced seasickness and said 
it was the best journey he had ever made. He lived here six years with his 
sons, John and Michael, and was ninety-six years old at the time of his death. 

Michael Thiel received his education in the common schools and he 
grew to maturity on the home farm in Germany. He also studied after 
coming to America, and is fairly well educated. He came to Scott county, 
Iowa, in 1880 and remained there until 1891, when he came to Clinton 
county and purchased the one hundred and sixty-acre farm. He has put all 
the improvements on the same and has erected substantial and comfortable 
buildings and has one of the most desirable farms in this part of the county. 
He carries on general farming and raises a good grade of live stock. 

In politics Mr. Thiel is a Democrat, but he has never made any effort 
to be elected to public office, preferring to devote his time to his farm. He 
and his family are members of the Catholic church. 

Mr. Thiel was married in 1887 to Mary Gessner, a native of Ohio, 
having been born in Shelby county, February 19, 1855. She is the daughter 
of Michael and Anna M. Gessner, who came to Ohio in an early day. He 
later moved to Scott county, Iowa, where he made his home for twenty-two 
years, then moved to Benton county, this state, living at Norway the rest 
of their lives. He died there on June 4, 1901 ; his widow is still living, hav- 
ing reached the age of seventy-eight years. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Thiel six children have been born, namely : Michael' 
John, Margaret. John Ger^rge, Mary Elizabeth and Mary, the last named 
being deceased. 

Mr. Thiel's beautiful residence, a view of which graces this work, was 
erected by himself, and in it the spirit of hospitality and good cheer is ever 
in evidence. The barns and outbuildings are up to date and are all under 
paint, and the entire farm is considered a model one in every respect. He 
deserves great credit for what he has accomplished. When he came to 
Davenport, Iowa, on November 22. 1880, his cash capital' amounted to five 
cents. A Mr. Eckard paid his board for three days and he then worked two 
days at picking corn. He then hired out for three months, receiving ten 



762 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

dollars for the period ; and during the following three years he was employed 
at a wage of eighte'en dollars a month. He then started farming on his 
own account, boarding for three years, and then married. At that time he 
moved to a farm of two hundred and fifty acres at Dixon, Iowa, and after 
he had the place equipped he found himself twenty-two hundred dollars in 
debt. But by his own careful management and the co-operation of his wife, 
he has steadily pushed his way forward and is now numbered among the 
leading farmers of Iowa. 



JOHN JOSEPH LOGAN. 

From the beautiful and far-famed Emerald Isle comes the genial gentle- 
man whose life record is here briefly set forth; from the clime of the fanciful 
Thomas Moore and the patriotic Charles Stewart Parnell ; from the land where 
glisten the waters of Killarney and where sweeps the placid river Lee. Such 
men are always desirable citizens, for they are not only congenial and cheerful 
in all situations, but also men of action. John Joseph Logan, who is one of 
the well known contractors of Clinton, Iowa, is a fitting type of such citizens. 
He was born in county Mayo, Ireland, March 22, 1866, and is the son of Mar- 
tin J. Logan, who was born and reared in Ireland and who came to America 
in 1873. He located in Clinton, Iowa, and he sent for his family in 1875. 
He had located on a farm near Clinton and later he moved to a farm in Center 
township, this county. In 1883 he moved to Clinton and here worked as a 
teamster for several years. His death occurred on May i, 1909. He was a 
Democrat and a member of the Catholic church. His family consisted of four 
sons and an equal number of daughters, John Joseph, of this review, being 
the oldest; James, who lived in Carlisle, Iowa, died August i, 1910; Ann; 
Mary married D. C. Manning and lives in Hampshire township, this county ; 
Martin F. ; Margaret married A. J. Nickson, of Aurora, Illinois; Dehlia; 
Hugh B. lives in Clinton. 

John J. Logan was educated in the j)ublic schools of Clinton county and 
a business college at Clinton, thus becoming well equipped for a business ca- 
reer. After leaving school, in order to get a start he began working in a 
sawmill, continuing some time, and then he was connected with the wagon 
works of A. B. Spies, doing millwright work. Then for a few years he fol- 
lowed contracting, finally forming a partnership with Butler King under the 
firm name of King & Logan, succeeding W. J. Cook in business. They did a 
very satisfactory business and in 1904 Mr. King died and since that time Mr. 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 763 

Logan has conducted the business alone and it has had a gradual and substan- 
tial growth and has now assumed very extensive proportions. Mr. Logan un- 
derstands thoroughly this line of work and he spares no pains to please his 
patrons in every detail, and because of his integrit}- and business ability he 
has the confidence and good will of his patrons. 

Politically, Mr. Logan is a Democrat and a member of the Catholic 
church; fraternally, he belongs to the Knights of Columbus and the Catholic 
Order of Foresters. 

Mr. Logan was married on December 30, 1903, to Mary C. Hendsey, 
who was born in Clinton in 1875. Her parents died when she was an infant 
and she was adopted and assumed an adopted name. To ]\Ir. and Mrs. Logan 
one child has been born, named Robert James, whose birth occurred on Sep- 
tember 21, 1905. 



PETER N. PETERSEN. 

Among the large class of progressive and honored citizens of Clinton 
county who have come to us from foreign shores, none have shown more 
worthy traits of character or been more active in the business affairs of the 
countv than the gentleman whose biography we herewith present. Mr. Peter- 
sen is the owner of a popular and well managed groceiy store in the city of 
Clinton, where he has won an envied reputation for fair dealing and loyalty to 
his adopted country. 

Peter N. Petersen was born August 28, 1864, in Schleswig-Holstein, Ger- 
many, and he is the son of Nicholas and Lena (Moritzen) Petersen. The 
father was a carpenter by occupation, spending his early life in his native 
country and receiving his education there, also married in his native land. 
In 1882 he brought his family to America and located in Clinton, Iowa. Here 
he remained, working as a carpenter until 1888, when he moved to the state 
of Oregon, where he bought land and became well established, finally owning 
a farm of one hundred and eighty acres, and he and the rest of the family 
still live in that state, with the exception of Peter N. of this review. The 
mother, Mrs. Lena Petersen, is deceased. Four children were born to Nich- 
olas Petersen and wife, namely: Peter N., of this review; Christian, who 
lives in Oregon ; Lena Klemsen also lives in that state ; Margaret Dethlefs. 

Peter N. Petersen grew to maturity in Germany and Avas educated in the 
schools of his native community. He emigrated to America with his parents 
when he was eighteen years of age. After reaching Clinton, Iowa, he clerked 



764 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

for Namanny & Frahm, during which time he not only rendered high class 
and satisfactory service, but also learned the "ins and outs" of the business, 
which has been of incalculable benefit to him in later years, for it was there 
that he laid the foundation for his mercantile life. In 1888 he moved to 
Oregon with his parents and lived with them on the farm there for eleven 
vears. In 1899, having tired of the West and believing that he could do better 
in Clinton, he returned to this city and clerked for T. S. Petersen in his gro- 
cery store until 1906, and increased the popularity of this firm by his courteous 
and considerate treatment of customers. In that year he went into partnership 
with Jans A. Anderson, opening a general grocery store on March i, 1906, 
this large and well kept store being located at No. 400 North Third street. 
They carry a large and carefully selected stock and their trade has gradually 
grown to large proportions and they enjoy the patronage of the best citizens 
of the city. Politically, Mr. Petersen is a Democrat, but he has never sought 

public office. 

Mr. Petersen was married on March 22, 1900, to Sophia Christine Kroe- 
ger, who was born in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, on June 13, 1870. She 
came to Clinton, Iowa, from her native land in 1882, when twelve years of 
age, having accompanied her parents, Henry and Anna Kroeger. This union 
has been without issue. 



NIS NISSEN. 



The life history of Nis Nissen, one of the best known and most popular 
merchants of Clinton, is deemed eminently worthy to be included in this vol- 
ume along with the other representative characters of Clinton county, partly 
because of its consistency to the right and partly because of its usefulness and 
inspiration to others. 

Mr. Nissen is an American by adoption only, having been born in Ger- 
many on October 12, 1853, but the major part of his life has been spent in 
this country. He is the son of John Henry and Fredericka Nissen, the father 
born in Germany on January 11, 1827, and the latter in the fatherland in 
1829. The father was a laborer and spent his entire life in his native land. 
His family consisted of three sons and two daughters, namely : John, Martin, 
Mrs. Anna Anderson, Christina, who died in Germany, and the subject. 

Nis Nissen was educated in the common schools of Germany. There he 
grew to maturity and took up farming for a livelihood. Believing that greater 
opportunities awaited him in the new world, he bade farewell to his parental 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 765 

roof-tree, when lie was nineteen years of age, and emigrated to our shores, 
coming- direct to the state of Ilhnois. where he worked on a farm for a period 
of four years. He came to CHnton. Iowa, in 1877, and W'Orked on a farm 
for some time. He sHved his money and was all the while casting about for 
something more agreeable and remunerating, so in 1886 he launched out into 
the mercantile business, forming a partnership with B. M. Jacobsen. under the 
firm name of Xissen & Jacobsen. They opened a dry goods and shoe store on 
First avenue and Second street, which they maintained for a period of sixteen 
years, enjoying a very liberal patronage with the city and surrounding coun- 
try. Then for a period of five years they conducted their store at Fifth ave- 
nue and Third street. This partnership continued verv- much to the mutual 
advantage of both until 1907, when it was dissolved, and since then Mr. Nis- 
sen has operated alone a very popular store at No. 112 South Fourth street, 
carrying a large, carefully selected and tastily arranged stock of dr}^ goods, 
shoes and men's furnishing goods. He is regarded as among the most pro- 
gressive merchants of this city, and enjoys a very large trade among the Ger- 
mans and the Danes. Mr. Nissen and his family belong to the German Luth- 
eran church, and he is a member of the German Society and the Turners. 

On May 10. 1881, Mr. Nissen was married to Margaret Hass, w^ho was 
born in Germany on June 7, 1858, and there she grew to maturity and was 
educated. She came to America in about 1879. This union has resulted in 
the birth of the following children: Carl H.. who is in business with his 
father; Freda, Alma and Louisa. This is one of the popular and highly re- 
spected families of Clinton and numbers hosts of warm personal friends. 



JAMES BRODERICK. 

The profession of hotel keeping requires a peculiar fitness and much ex- 
perience in order to succeed. There is a large force of servants and employes 
to oversee, the kind and quality of food served must be the subject of care, and 
the tastes of the public constantly regarded. And these are not the least diffi- 
cult of problems, for if it is a task for the mistress of a private establishment 
to keep it properly cared for by her servants, how much greater must be the 
task of the hotel keeper, whose success must depend on the efficiency of his 
employes in lines in which efficient help is the hardest to secure. ]\Ir. Brode- 
rick seems to have mastered the problems of hotel keeping, from the manner in 
w^hich his establishments have been carried on. 



766 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

James Broderick was born on October 4, 1866, in Hokah, Minnesota, 
the son of William and Mary Broderick, who lived and died on a farm in the 
above-named state. James Broderick was given a common school education 
and then went to live on a farm near Sioux Falls, South Dakota, owned by 
his uncle, where he worked until twenty-two. Then he went to work on the 
Chicago, St. Paul, Milwaukee & Omaha railroad, with which company he spent 
twelve years as brakeman and engineer. He then came to Clinton and opened 
the Tenth Avenue House, which he operated for three years successfully. 
When the Northwestern shops and round house were moved in 1902 to Cam- 
anche avenue, he built the Northwestern Hotel on the same avenue, and owing 
to his extensive business was compelled to buy a large residence at No. 724 
Camanche avenue, to help take care of the trade. He kept this house until 
March 12, 1910, when he leased the Revere House, which he remodeled, and 
now has one of the best hotels in the city, with sixty-five rooms, eight of which 
are equipped "with private baths, and are always full. His cuisine has at- 
tracted many table boarders, in which he enjoys a good trade. On May i of 
the present year the Chicago & Northwestern railway put him in charge of their 
eating house in the yards at Clinton and since that he has also taken the 
Northwestern Hotel at Fulton, Iowa, which he opened December 12, 19 10. 
After operating for two months the company has added fifty more rooms. He 
opened the hotel at Janesville, Wisconsin, on November i, 19 10, close to the 
Northwestern yards at South Janesville. The local lodge of Elks includes him 
among its charter members. 

In 1891 Mr. Broderick was married to Tillie Johnson, a native of Sioux 
Falls. South Dakota, and they have one child, a daughter, Evelyn. Mr. Brode- 
rick is one of the progressive and enterprising citizens of Clinton of the type 
which has developed the city. 



EMIL DIEBNER. 



To the average man, so-called success is the reward of persistent striv- 
ing and grim determination. It is sometimes gained through selfish rivalry 
and competition, and frequently is attained by the aid of "pull," preference 
and influence. So powerful and necessary seem these aids that the one who 
cannot command them is often disheartened at his prospects of success. But 
some men, like Emil Diebner, now living retired in Clinton, Iowa, have 
learned how to achieve true success through the wisdom of which Solomon 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 767 

said, "Length of days is in her right hand, and in her left riches and honor." 
Mr. Diebner was born in Germany, March 23, 1830, and he is the son of 
Cai-l August and Mary (Hoffnoster) Diebner, the father born on June 5, 
1 79 1, and died in 1841 in his native country. The mother was bom on July 
2, 1793. The father became well educated and he taught school in the father- 
land for a period of twenty-seven years. 

Emil Diebner is the only one living of a family of seven children. He 
went to school to his father until he was twelve years old, or until the death 
of the elder Diebner. After leaving school the son served an apprenticeship 
of three years at the cabinetmaker's trade, and when twenty years of age he 
went into the Prussian army and sers^ed every day for a period of two years. 
In the spring of 1853 he came to America and worked in New York as a 
cabinetmaker for a year or more, then turned his attention to general carpen- 
tering. He came to Chicago and worked at the carpenter's trade until 1856, 
then his employer, William Wentworth. brought Mr. Diebner to Clinton and 
he worked for him until the panic of 1857. Since that time Mr. Diebner has 
worked for himself at carpentering and building-. His mother lived with him 
here until 1865, dying- on October ist of that year. When the subject came 
to Clinton there were only about two dozen houses on Front street. He has 
lived to see the town grow to a thriving city and has taken a conspicuous part 
in its growth. Although now advanced in years, Mr. Diebner is well pre- 
served, hale and hearty and still does some work. His long and active life 
has been due. in large measure, no doubt, to the fact that he has always been 
careful of his personal habits and has taken excellent care of himself. Al- 
though he has taken a great interest in the affairs of Clinton and vicinity he 
would never run for alderman, although frequently asked to do so. After the 
death of his mother, he went to New Mexico for the benefit of his health. 
He made the trip with four ox teams and was well armed, fearing the Indians 
of the Southwest. He saw many buffalo and killed sixteen of these animals 
on the outward trip. He is a very interesting talker on the old davs and of 
his experiences in the West. He mined gold there and also worked at his 
trade, and was very successful at the former. 

Returning- East for the purpose of marrying, he espoused, on March 23, 
1870, Minnie Gest, who was born on December 5. 1848. in Germany. She 
came to America with her parents when she was a young girl. The following 
children constitute Mr. Diebner's family : William Fredrick, Emil Carl and 
Minnie. Emil is in California and William F. is engaged in business at 
Eldora, Iowa. Their pleasant, substantial and neatly kept dwelling is at No. 
100 North Fourth street. Mr. Diebner also owns several valuable brick build- 



^68 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

ings in the same block, which he built over forty years ago. He has been very 
successful in his business affairs and is well situated, but he likes carpentering 
so well that he still works occasionally "for old time's sake." Politically, he is 
liberal in his views. 



JOHN E. PURCELL. 



Conspicuous among the represcTitative business men of Clinton, Iowa, 
is the well-known gentleman whose name introduces this biographical re- 
view. The industrious and well-regulated life he has led has gained for him 
not only material success, but the friendship, confidence and good-will of a 
vast acquaintance. 

John E. Purcell is a native of Clinton, having been born here on 
April 5, 1866, and he is the son of James and Mary (Conner) Purcell. The 
father was born near Limerick, Ireland, and died in 1873, while the mother's 
birth occurred in Canada ; she is still living. James Purcell was a contractor 
by occupation and he was sixteen years of age when he came to America 
and settled in southern Illinois. He was very successful in his line of endeavor 
and established a good home here. His family consisted of two sons and 
two daughters, John E.. of this review, being the first in order of birth; 
the others are Charles J., an engineer on the Northwestern railroad; Mrs. 
Margaret Calnan and Anna. 

John E. Purcell was educated in the public schools of Clinton and 
finished at St. Mary's school. Leaving the school room, being equipped with 
a good practical' education, he began life for himself as clerk in the grocery 
store of O'Donnell & Calnan, where he remained two years, during which 
time he gained many valuable pointers relative to the mercantile business. 
He then clerked two years for the grocery firm of Hall & Pollard, then went 
to the store of S. C. Seaman, where he remained three years. He then went 
to Denver, Colorado, and clerked two years for the McNamarrah Dry Goods 
Company, giving his usual satisfaction. He always took more or less interest 
in athletics, especially outdoor sports, and he played baseball with the Denver 
City League, and he was a member of a brass band at Denver. He then 
returned to Clinton county and was later salesman in the city trade of Chi- 
cago for the Drummond Tobacco Company, later working in southern Iowa. 
He was a traveling salesman for twelve years in northern Illinois for Dean 
Brothers & Lincoln, wholesale grocers, remaining with them until they 
went out of business, being considered one of their most efficient and trust- 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 769 

worthy employes. Then for two years he was in the employ of the Steele- 
Wecldells Company of Chicago, resigning his position July i, 1905. He then 
started in business for himself at Clinton, Iowa, opening a shoe store under 
the firm name of Henley & Purcell. One year later Mr. Purcell bought out 
his partner's interest, and on February i, 1909, moved the store to No. 305 
Main street, Lyons, where he still conducts the same and enjoys a very liberal 
patronage from tlie town and surrounding country, having a neat and well- 
kept store and carrying an up-to-date and carefully selected stock* of goods. 

Mr. Purcell is a member of the Knights of Columbus; in fact, he organ- 
ized the lodge at Clinton, and was the first grand knight and charter member 
of Sterling Council. No. 662. at Sterling, Illinois. On October 2, 1902. he 
transferred his membership to St. Edward's Council at Clinton. Politically, 
he is a Democrat, but independent locally, and he is a prominent Catholic. 

Mr. Purcell was married on June 19, 1895, to Louise Victoria Henle, 
who was born June 11, 1865, in Lyons, and is the daughter of Mathias and 
Theresa ( Staley) Henle, a well-known and high respected family, and this 
union has resulted in the birth of the following children : Theresa Maiy, 
Louise Marie, Anna, Helen (deceased), Josephine, Dorothy, Margaret Ber- 
nardine, Catherine Natahe and Mary Elizabeth. 



NICHOLAS NAEVE, JR. 

The Naeve family is eminently deserving in every respect to be mentioned 
at proper length in a history of Clinton county, owing to the fact that its 
several members have borne the \ery l^est of reputations and have been, with- 
out exception, industrious and have done their full share in developing the 
county. They are known as progressive agriculturists and believe in keeping 
abreast of the times. 

One of the well known representatives of this family is Nicholas Naeve, 
Jr., who has a valuable and well-kept landed estate in Hampshire township. 
He was born in this county, on April 21, 1869. and is the son of Nicholas 
Naeve, Sr., and Lizzie Henicke, both born in Germany, the former on August 
23, 1832, and the latter on May 6. 1839. The father came to America with 
his parents in 1846 or 1847, and this family located at Davenport, near which 
city the subject's grandfather, Fred Naeve, owned a farm, and there Nicholas 
Naeve, Sr., grew to maturity and became a farmer. He was educated in the 

(49) 



770 CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 

schools there, and he was married in that locaHty in about i860, coming to 
Chnton county soon afterwards and renting land until he could get a start. 
He finally bought one hundred and sixty acres in Center township and later 
bought one hundred and seventy acres in Hampshire township. He was a 
very successful farmer and became a man of considerable influence in his com- 
munity. His family consisted of eight sons and four daughters, namely: 
William, deceased ; Henry, Mrs. Mary Bohaldt, Mrs. Louisa Stigemann, Fred, 
Mrs. Anna Ehlers. Chris, Nicholas, Jr., Mrs. Carrie Schroeder and Albert. 

Nicholas Naeve, Jr., of this review, received his education in the public 
schools and he began very early to assist his father with the general work on 
the home farm and he remained there with him. When he married he moved 
on the farm of one hundred and seventy acres in Hampshire township, which 
he has worked to advantage, keeping up to a high standard of improvement 
and making a pronounced success of general farming and stock raising. He 
has a good farm and a veiy comfortable home, and he believes in keeping 
everything in first class condition about his place, being one of the leading 
farmers in this community. 

Mr. Naeve was married on March 5, 1895 to Mita Aheins. who was born 
in Center township, this county, on July 2, 1870. She is the daughter of 
Christopher Aheins, a native of Germany and one of the first settlers of Center 
township, where he was well known and prominent among the pioneers. Here 
Mrs. Naeve was reared and educated. She has borne her husband one inter- 
esting child, Hortensa. whose birth occurred on October 23, 1904. 



SAMUEL CREVELING. 

The subject of this sketch is an honorable representative of an old and 
esteemed family of Clinton county, and he has spent his life in the homestead 
in Hampshire township which he now owns. His paternal grandfather. Alex 
Creveling, was a native of Westmoreland county. Pennsylvania, but in an 
early day moved to Ohio, where he lived for a number of years. In his old 
age he returned to Pennsylvania and died many years ago in the countv of his 
birth. George W. Creveling. the subject's father, was born in Pennsylvania, 
and about the year 1844 or '45 moved to Iowa, making the journey by wagon, 
and locating originally in Clinton township, Clinton county. Later he changed 
his residence to Hampshire township, where he had previously bought one 
hundred and sixty acres of land, and subsequently increased his farm by pur- 



CLINTON COUNT Yj IOWA. 77 1 

chasing an additional eighty acres in the same locality. In due time he 
brought his land to a high state of cultivation, made good improvements, .and 
for a number of years ranked among the leading agriculturists and stock 
raisers of his part of the county. He lived a quiet life, exerted a beneficial 
influence among his neighbors, and all with whom he came into contact spoke 
in high terms of his many sterling qualities. In his young manhood, he mar- 
ried Catherine Webb, daughter of Thomas Webb, who bore him five sons and 
three daughters, three of the former and two of the latter still living. George 
W. Creveling departed this life in November, 1882, his good wife following 
him to the unknown country beyond death's mystic stream, on the 2nd day 
of December, 1891. Thomas Webb, father of Mrs. Creveling, was a native 
of Columbia county, Pennsylvania, and his wife, who prior to her marriage, 
bore the family name of Edwards, was born in England. Mr. and Mrs. 
Webb were married in the former's native county and state and ended their 
lives there, both dying a number of years ago. 

Samuel Creveling was bom September 19, 1855, in Clinton county, Iowa, 
received a common school education, and grew to maturity on the family 
homestead in Hampshire township, where he now lives. He was reared to 
agricultural pursuits and assisted his father in the farm until attaining his 
majority, when he began life. for himself as a tiller of the soil, a vo'cation he 
has followed with success and profit to the present time. In 1883, the year 
following his father's death, he bought the homestead and has since lived on 
the same, having made a number of substantial improvements. His farm 
contains one hundred and sixty acres of land, which in point of fertility and 
productiveness are not exceeded by any like area in the county, and which, 
under his efficient labors and good management, have been brought to a high 
state of cultivation, comparing favorably with the best farms in Hampshire 
township at the present time. As a farmer. ^Ir. Creveling is energetic and 
progressive, using modern methods in cultivating the soil, and he seldom, if 
ever, fails to realize abundant returns for his time and labor. In connection 
with general agriculture, he devotes considerable attention to live stock, which 
he finds an important branch of farming, and his success has been such that 
he is now the possessor of a handsome competency and in independent cir- 
cumstances. 

In his political affiliation, Mr. Creveling is a Republican, and though well 
informed as to the leading questions of the day and public matters in general, 
he is not an office seeker, preferring the quiet and contented life he now leads 
to any honor within the power of his fellow citizens to bestow. Honest and 
straightforward in all his dealings, and the soul of honor in his relations with 



^^2 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA, 

his fellow-men, his character has ever been above reproach, and wherever 
known he is highlv esteemed for his high standing as a man and citizen. 

Mr. Creveling was united in marriage with Dora T. Sundergard. who was 
born in Schleswig-Holstein, (Germany, and \\ho came to America in her girl- 
hood and grew to maturity in the state of Iowa. The family of Mr. and Mrs. 
Creveling consists of four children, wliose names are as follows: Samuel 
Preston, George W., Elmer and Lyman, all living and, with their parents, 
constituting a mutually happy and prosperous home circle. All of the above 
sons are intelligent and well educated, having been given the best school ad- 
vantages obtainable in their youth. After finishing the common branches in 
the district schools, they entered successively the high school of Lyons, from 
which they were graduated in due time with honorable records. 



JAMES H. SPENCE. 



One of the leading veterinarians of eastern Iowa is James H. Spence, of 
Clinton, who has made a success of his calling because he thoroughly prepared 
himself for it and has worked conscientiously and kept abreast of modem in- 
vestigation and research. He long ago succeeded in impressing his strong 
personality upon the people of Clinton and vicinity, whose interests he has at 
heart and which he has always manifested a desire to promote. He is an 
American by adoption only, having been born in London, Ontario, Canada, 
the date of his birth being September 2, 1866. He is the son of William 
Spence, who was born in Scotland in November, 1840, and who married 
Martha Dowzer, a native of Ireland. William Spence came to Canada when 
a mere lad, with his parents, and settled on a farm near London, province of 
Ontario. He eventually owned a farm near the same place and he and his 
wife still live there, being very comfortably established. Religiously, the 
elder Spence is a Presbyterian, as are, in fact, the other members of the fam- 
ilv. He is a member of the United Workmen lodge. 

James H. Spence. of this review, is the oldest of a family of five sons 
and two daughters, the others being William D., John Charles, Robert N., 
Walter L., Mrs. Clara Uren and Mrs. Edna McFarlan. 

The gentleman whose name heads this review was educated in the public 
schools of his native community in Ontario, Canada, and he remained on his 
father's farm until he was twenty years old, then attended the Ontario Vet- 
erinary College at Toronto, Canada, where he made a splendid record and 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 773 

from which institution he was graduated in the class of 1890. He located at 
Wyoming, Ontario, where he remained one year, then in December, 189 1, he 
came to Clinton, Iowa, and he has had a very successful practice ever since, 
with a gradual increase from year to year until he is recognized at present as 
the best veterinary surgeon in Clinton county. He keeps w^ell posted on cur- 
rent events, especially along scientific lines and in all matters pertaining to his 
profession. Although he is a Democrat, his ability was recognized by the Re- 
publican administration and he was appointed assistant state veterinarian. He 
was also appointed by the federal government examiner of stock for exporta- 
tion to Canada, and this position he continues to hold to the entire satisfac- 
tion of all concerned. His office is located at the Hart livery stables, Nos. 
117-121 Sixth avenue, Clinton, Iowa. He is always kept busy and his patrons 
come from remote districts. 

Doctor Spence is a member of the Presbyterian church, and, fraternally, 
he belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Masons, the Mod- 
ern Woodmen, the National Union and the Mystic Workers. He takes a 
lively interest in fraternal affairs and is prominent in lodge matters. 

Doctor Spence was married March 8, 1894, to Josephine Hall, w^ho was 
born in Wheatland, this county, June 26, 1874. She is the daughter of Abra- 
ham and Rhoda (Schneider) Hall, who are still living at Wheatland. Mr. 
Hall, who is retired, having formerly been in the lumber business, came to 
Clinton county after the Civil war. in which he was government photographer 
in the United States armv and afterwards a soldier. 



WILLIAM H. McKENNA. 

The Irish have the qualities which l>ring them to the front everywhere 
if but a chance is given them. Chances have been few^ and far between for 
them in their native country, but in this country they have found many op- 
portunities and have taken advantage of them. Mr. IMcKenna, a young man, 
born in Ireland, without advantages, is an eloquent example of the indomitable 
Irish spirit, for by his own efforts he has raised himself to an enviable position 
and has ser^^ed the county of his adoption well in public office. 

William H. McKenna was born on July 24, 1869, in county Tyrone, 
Ireland, the son of Charles and Sarah f Alalone) McKenna. His grandpar- 
ents were farmers in Ireland and spent their lives there. His parents came 
to Clinton county, Iowa, in 1880 and settled in Center Grove, Washington 



774 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

township, and three years later removed to Clinton, where his father died 
January 7, 1907. and his mother now lives. Charles McKenna was popular 
among his fellows, and was a strong adherent of the Democratic party. To 
the last he was faithful to the Catholic religion of his fathers. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles McKenna were the parents of eight children: 
Katherine, who married Bryan Manny, a farmer living in Cuyahoga county, 
Ohio: William H. ; James, a motorman in Clinton; Hannah, who married 
fohn Doherty, who is operating a typewriter agency in Chicago; Anna, who 
was trained as a nurse at Mercy Hospital, at Davenport, and married J. L. 
Tracy, a switchman for the Northwestern railroad in Clinton ; Margie, who 
married James Dillon, and died in December, 1905 ; Edward, an electrician in 
Chicago; and John C. who is connected with his brother-in-law, Mr. Doherty, 
in the typewriter agency. The sons are all Democrats. 

William H. McKenna attended the Christian Brothers school at Omagh, 
county Tyrone, Ireland, and the common schools of Clinton county and Clin- 
ton. When about fifteen he began working in W. J. Young's saw mill, receiv- 
ing sixty cents per day at first. He continued in the saw^mill for five years, 
then worked for the grocery firm of Hayes & Murphy until March, i'898. In 
that month Mr. McKenna, stirred with the spirit of patriotism towards his 
adopted country, enlisted in Company L, Forty-ninth Regiment Iowa Volun- 
teers, and served through the Spanish-American war. His regiment was 
sent to Cuba in December. 1898, and remained on patrol and guard duty there 
until May 13. 1899. This regiment was under the command of Gen. Fitzhugh 
Lee and Colonel Dowes. Mr. McKenna was detailed as commissary clerk and 
seiwed in that capacity throughout the greater portion of his enlistment. 

On his return from the war Mr. McKenna re-entered the employ of 
Hayes & Murphy, but after two years went into the grocery business in part- 
nership with P. H. McCarthy, under the firm name of McCarthy & McKenna. 
In 1908 he sold his interest to Mr. McCarthy's son. The Democratic party 
nominated Mr. McKenna for the office of recorder of Clinton county in 1906; 
be was successful in tlie election and has since that time administered the 
duties of the position in a conscientious and impartial manner. He has won 
the respect of the public for his efficiency and has added many to his already 
large list of friends. He is a member of the Catholic church. 

On June 8, 1899, Mr. McKenna was married to Edith M. Sill, the daugh- 
ter of Charles and Elizabeth (Blessing) Sill, born at Lisbon, Iowa, June 8, 
1874. Her father was a merchant at Lisbon, and died when Edith was three 
years old : her mother lives on Camanche avenue in Clinton. To this mar- 
riage three children have been born, Marion Elinor, July 10, 1900; Margie 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 775 

Elizabeth, December 17. 1905; Maiy Edith, March ii, 1907. They are very 
bright and interesting Httle girls. 

Mr. McKenna stands high in the regard of the people of his county, and 
has won an enviable success for a young man whose early circumstances were 
less than ordinarily favorable, but which, thanks to his ability, did not hold 
him down. 



ROBERT GEORGE BRUMER. 

Deserving the many successes that have come to him, Robert George 
Brumer, one of the best known jewelers in Clinton county, may well antici- 
pate greater reward further along in life's journey, being now in the prime of 
manhood. He is held in highest esteem throughout this locality, for he has 
been honorable and upright at all times. 

Mr. Brumer is of German descent and was born at Pekin, Illinois, on 
August 30, i860. He is the son of Ferdinand and Louisa (Hoelscher) 
Brumer, both born in Germany, the father on Januaiy 3, 1832, and the mother 
on May 24. 1834. They grew to maturity and were educated there, but came 
to America single, Mr. Brumer coming to New Orleans in 1850 and two years 
later he lived at St. Louis for a short time. He was married at Charleston, 
South Carolina, and finally moved to Pekin. Illinois, in the middle of the 
fifties and he conducted a flouring mill there during the Civil war. Earlier in 
life he had engaged in merchandising. He served in the Union army for a 
time in the early sixties, having enlisted in an Illinois volunteer infantry regi- 
ment, and he saw some hard service, being wounded by a bayonet thrust. In 
1868 he returned to Gennany, taking his family and, retiring from business, 
he lived there until his death. His family consisted of four sons, namely: 
Louis, now deceased; Robert George, of this review; Gustav A., and Ulysses 
S., living in DeWitt, Iowa. 

Robert G. Brumer, of this review, was eight years old when his parents 
moved to Germany from Illinois and he received a good education in the 
public schools and high schools of the fatherland. Early in life he began 
learning the watchmaker's trade and he visited other countries of Europe in 
order to complete his education in that line. Thus well equipped for his 
chosen life work, he returned to America, locating in Clinton. Iowa, in 1880, 
and he began to work for E. H. Howes in a jewelry store. In 1886 he and 
his brother Gustav foiTned a partnership and opened a jewelry store in the 
Davis block on Second street, under the firm name of Brumer Brothers. In 



776 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

1887 they moved to their present location on Fifth avenue. They started in 
a small way in their original store, but by judicious management and honest 
and courteous treatment of their thousands of customers during the past quar- 
ter of a centur}^ they have built a large and ever-growing trade and have one 
of the best known stores of this kind in the county. They carry a large and 
full line of jewelry, in fact, everything commonly found in the best and up- 
to-date jewelry stores. They do a high grade of goldsmithing and all kinds 
of repair work on watches, etc. The Brumer Brothers also carry on and 
manage the Eurema Company, which was organized about 1900. They manu- 
facture a soldering fluid used in fusing gold, requiring very little heat. The 
owners got the idea of this excellent fluid from their early education among the 
goldsmiths of Germany and Switzerland. The products of the Eurema Com- 
pany have a very wide sale and are handled by every jobber in the United 
States. 

Robert G. Brumer is prominent in lodge circles, being a chapter Mason 
at Clinton and a member of every lodge in this city. On September 22, 1885, 
he was married to Elizabeth Flick, who was born in Germany on July 31, 
1862, and this union has resulted in the birth of three children, Ferdinand Rob- 
ert, Gustav A. and Herbert Bismark. 



MARTIN INGWERSEN. 

Herein is mentioned one of the successful business men of Clinton, who 
has made himself known and felt in the business world outside of his city, 
and has been prominent in the councils of his fellows of the same business 
throughout the state. He has done much to bring about between those en- 
gaged in similar businesses something of co-operation and of that working 
together for general business betterment, which can not fail in making con- 
ditions better for both producer and consumer. He is another of those Ger- 
man immigrants who have by their own efforts achieved prosperity in busi- 
ness, starting with nothing and beginning life as a laborer. Certainly such 
a career shows the possession of more than ordinary powers to cope with 
the difficulties of life. 

Martin Tngwersen was born in Germany, June 16, i860, the son of 
I. M. and Margaret (Soenksen) Tngwersen. His parents were born in Ger- 
many, and there his father died in 1893, and his mother in 1881. They were 
the parents of three children, of whom all are living. The father lived a 




MARTIN INGWERSEN 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 'J'JJ 

quiet life, giving his attention entirely to his occupation, of which he was 
very fond. He left to his children the heritage of a strong character. 

Martin Ingwersen attended the common schools, was reared on the 
farm, and served three years in the German cavalry, a valuable experience. 
In the spring of 1883 he came to America and located in Clinton county. He 
first worked on a farm, then in a sawmill, beginning in this humble manner. 
He was next in the employ of the Standard Oil Company, and later obtained 
a position in the bottling establishment of Arlen & Son of Clinton. In 1890, 
Charles Arlen, Sr., the founder of the business, died and Alartin became a 
partner with Edward A. Arlen, and this partnership still continues. The 
business has increased to very large proportions since then, and is one 
of the leading establishments of the city. It is located at No. 600 South 
First street. Mr. Ingwersen is also engaged in the coal and wood business, 
which adds a handsome profit to his income. He has been among the most 
active in building up the Iowa State Bottlers' Association, and the Iowa 
Liquor Dealers' Association, and has been president of both these organiza- 
tions and represents them both on the national executive boards. In politics, 
he is a Democrat. Both he and his wife are members of the German Lutheran 
church. In fraternal relations he is a member of the Knights of Pythias, 
and holds the office of colonel in the LTniform Rank. He also belongs to the 
Elks, the Eagles, the German Society, and the Turner Society. 

Mr. Ingwersen was married in 1886 to Marie Carstensen, a native of 
Iowa. To their union three children were born : Andrea, Avorking in his 
father's office; Paul, employed in Denver: and Ella, working in her father's 
office. Marie Ingwersen died in 1891. and ]\Ir. Ingwersen later married 
Frances Moeser, also a native of Clinton county. She is the mother of three 
children : Hugo, a student at AVartburg College ; Mollie. in the public schools, 
and Frieda. 

Mr. Ingwersen is a man of recognized and unquestioned business ability 
of a high order, and a citizen of much public spirit. 



ROBERT D. COOPER. 

One of the best known and most influential men in Hampshire township 
is Robert D. Cooper, owner of the widely known Brookside farm, Avho lived 
to see and take part in the wonderful development that has characterized 
Clinton county, having always stood ready to aid in whatever way he could 



7^8 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

the furthering of all worthy objects looking to the general good, and he is 
therefore held in the highest esteem by all who know him. He comes to us 
from the Atlantic seaboard, having been born near Bernington. New Jersey, 
April I, 1849, ^"d he is the son of James and Charlotte (Snyder) Cooper, 
both natives of the state of New Jersey, the father born in the vicinity of 
Bernington on February 10, 1826. 

In i860 James Cooper brought his family west to Illinois and then set- 
tled near Peoria, and remained there one year, then they came to Clinton 
county, Iowa, in the fall of 1861. The father bought eighty acres in Center 
township. Later he sold out and bought another farm of one hundred and 
forty acres in Lincoln township, one mile south of his first place. In 1895 
he rented his place and moved to Clinton and retired. His death occurred in 
July, 1901, and that of his wife thirty-one years previously, in 1870. He 
was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Only two of his children 
survive. ]\Iary Alice and Robert D. of this review. 

Robert D. Cooper received his first schooling in New Jersey and finished 
in Iowa. After leaving school he remained on his father's farm until he was 
twenty-two years of age. He started in life for himself by buying eighty 
acres in Hampshire township and he has been a farmer ever since. In 1875 
he bought a farm of eighty acres in Hampshire township, which he added 
to his former purchase, and he now has three eighties together. He has 
placed all modern and substantial buildings on his farm and has it well im- 
proved in every particular. He has been very successful as a general farmer. 

Mr. Cooper was married on December 25, 1871, to Betsy Ann Ashpole, 
who was born in Ohio, September 27, 1853. She is the daughter of John 
and Jane Ashpole. who came from England in 1845 ^"^1 located in Ohio. 
Later came to Clinton county, Iowa, in 1850. making the long journey overland 
with wagon and team. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Cooper the following children have been born : Char- 
lotte Jane, born on February 15. 1873. married George R. Housen October 
4, 1893, and they have one son. Robert John ; \A^alter B.. born February 24, 
1878. was married December 14. 1899, to Ida Egland. of Lincoln township, 
and they have four children, Oliver R., Walter J.. .Artliur B. and Burnice A. ; 
Mabel Grace, born February 23. 1887; Albert Earl. l)orn November 2^, 1891. 

Mr. Cooper is a memljer of the ^Methodist Episcopal church and in poli- 
tics he is a Republican. He lias held all the townshi]! offices and is prominent 
in local affairs. 

Mr. Cooper is a well informed man and he is looked upon by his neigh- 
l>ors as a leader and ad\-iser. his past honoral)le and successful record \\arrant- 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 779 

ing their utmost confidence. His example is followed in reference to markets, 
etc. He has been greatly assisted in his successful life work by his wife, who 
is a woman of superior ability in many respects, and much of his success has 
been due to licr judicious counsel and encouragement. 



HENRY LINDMEIER. 

Another of the young farmers of Hampshire township, Clinton county, 
who is one of the foremost citizens of his locality is Henry Lindmeier. who 
has established a firm reputation for honesty of purpose in all his dealings 
with his fellow man and by being the advocate of clean and wholesome prin- 
ciples in the home, society and politics. He has the sterling traits character- 
istic of his family, which is of German blood, he being of the second genera- 
tion in America, and his birth occurred in Hampshire township, Clinton 
county. Iowa, on the home place, December 29. 1885. He is the son of John 
H. and Margaret (Greve) Lindmeier, both born in Germany, the father in 
1835, ^^'^^^ his death occurred in 1906. 

John H. Lindmeier grew to maturity in his native land and was educated 
there. In 1856 he emigrated to America and first worked about Chicago for 
awhile, hiring out at various pursuits until he was married, after which he 
bought two hundred and twenty acres in Hampshire township, Clinton county, 
and in later years bought sixty acres more. He improved his land and en- 
gaged in general farming and stock raising, being quite an extensi\e cattle 
feeder. He laid by a competency and had a very comfortable home by renson 
of his industr}', honesty and persistency. 

To John H. Lindmeier and wife the following children were born : 
Mrs. Anna Bremer: Emil and John, both deceased; Otto, William, Mrs. 
Emma Hansen. George, Ella; Henry, of this review, being the youngest of 
the family. 

Mr. Lindmeier attended high school at Lyons, where he made a splendid 
record for scholarship and from which institution he was graduated in 1903. 
He later attended the Towa Agricultural College at Ames, where he took a 
special course in agriculture and well qualified himself for his life work, after 
which he returned to the farm and has since devoted his attention exclusively 
to this line of endea^'or, applying to the soil modern and most approved agri- 
cultural metliods, so that quite naturally he reaps the greatest results possible 
and only a cursory glance over his splendidlv kept place is sufficient to show 



-rgO CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

that his ideas are not onl}^ the most practical but the most artistic and al- 
too-ether desirable. Although a young man, he could teach many of the old 
pioneers a thing or two in the way of scientific and practical farming, and, 
judging by the strides he has made in the past, it is safe to predict that the 
future holds much of success in store for him. He has a cozy, neat and at- 
tractively located dwelling and substantial outbuildings. Everything about 
him shows the exercise of good taste and industry as well. Mr. Lindmeier 
makes a specialty of raising Poland-China hogs and they are of such superior 
quality that they find a very ready sale. 

On August 31, 1909, Mr. Lindmeier was married to Anna Carstensen, 
who was born in Greene county. Iowa, on March 31, 1889. the daughter of 
August and Mary (Nahnson) Carstensen, an early settler there and a highly 
respected citizen. Mrs. Lindmeier is a young lady of many estimable traits, 
and. like her husband, is popular with a wide circle of friends. 

Mr. Lindmeier is a pleasant man to meet, genial, wholesouled, a good 
conversationalist, well posted on agriculture, horticulture and kindred sub- 
jects, as well as the current topics of the day and with the world's best litera- 
ture. His ideals and ideas are high ; he applies his education to his practical 
afifairs and finds that it pays both in convenience and pecuniaiT rewards. 



AUGUST HARTMANN. 

Many of the best farmers of today rely on something other than general 
farming to insure them an annual income, and thus if one thing fails they suc- 
ceed with another. One of the farmers of Lincoln township, Clinton county, 
who is an avarian of much local reputation is August Hartmann, who is mak- 
ing a success of whatever he turns his attention to. 

Mr. Hartmann was born in the city of Clinton, this county, on February 
26. 1874. and he is the son of Christian Peter and Margaret Morritsen, both 
born in the province of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, which country was 
foiTnerly a part of Denmark, the father born on May 8, 1846, and the mother 
born on August 20. 1846. The father learned the trade of painter in his 
native land and became an expert at the same, which he worked at for some 
time there, and in 1870 he emigrated to the United States and settled in 
Clinton. Towa. continuing at his trade for a period of sixteen years, when, 
his health failing, he gave up his trade, although there was a great demand 
for his services, and purchased eighty acres of land in Lincoln township 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 781 

which he farmed for a period of twenty }ears, then in lyoj he hought ten 
acres near Chnton. He remodeled the huilding on this land and moved to it, 
retiring from active work. His son, Bernard, the subject's only brother, 
lives on his eighty-acre farm, the old homestead. 

August Hartmann, of this review, was educated in the public schools of 
Clinton, Iowa, and after leaving school he stayed at home, assisting his father 
with the work on the farm and in maintaining a dairy. The son sold milk, 
etc., at wholesale. At present August lives with his parents and is engaged 
in small fruit growing, principally for the local markets. He also keeps a 
large number of bees and he has about one thousand pounds of honey annually 
for the market, which is eagerly sought after. He understands well the 
care of bees and has one of the best aviaries in the county, and he is also well 
posted on horticultural subjects so that he is making a success of his fruit 
growing. He has remained unmarried, preferring to care for his aged par- 
ents, delighting in ministering to their every want. He is a hard-working, 
unassuming young man and is deeply interested in the general improvement 
of his locality and county, and is always ready to help along a good cause. 



CLEM KRUMPELMANN. 

Success has crowned the efforts of the gentleman whose name introduces 
this biographical re\'iew because he has spared no pains in developing himself 
along the chosen lines of his. life work, and he has always sought to do his 
best and treat his fellow men as he would have them treat him. 

Clem Krumpelmann. one of the best known jewelers of Clinton county 
and a highly respected citizen of Lyons, Was born in Prussia, Germany, 
December 17, 1862. He is the son of George and Carrie (Artman) Krumpel- 
mann. wlio were natives of the fatherland and spent their lives there, the 
mother's people being of Hanover. The father was for some time a soldier 
in the army there and served in the war of 1848. Their family consisted of 
four sons. Clem being the third in order of birth; Henry, August and Frank 
are all deceased. 

The subject was educated in the schools of his native land and learned 
the watchmaker's trade there. Knowing that ready employment awaited the 
skilled artisan in the L^nited States, he emigrated to St. Louis, Missouri, in 
1882, and lived in the Mound City for one year and a half, working at his 
trade, then left the Missouri metropolis and came to Lyons. Iowa. He had 



782 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

Strained his eyes by too close application to his trade, and in order to recover he 
worked at farming and general labor for awhile after coming to Clinton 
county. He spent two years in the state of Arkansas, and in 1902 he started a 
general jewelry store at No. 706 Main street, Lyons, Iowa, and although he 
had a capital at that time of but one hundred dollars he has by hard and honest 
work gradually built up an excellent business, now maintaining a neat and 
well stocked jewelry store, and he does all kinds of repairing, being one of 
the best men in his line in the county. He is steady and industrious, unassum- 
ing and believes in attending strictly to his individual affairs. He takes con- 
siderable interest in church work, but does not mingle with the political con- 
tingent to any great extent. He belongs to the German Catholic church and 
is a member of the German Workman's society. 

Mr. Krumpelmann was married on June 13, 1904, to Mary Dickman, who 
was born in Lyons in 1865. She is the daughter of Joseph and Theresa 
(Beckerman) Dickman, early settlers of Lyons. Mr. and Mrs. Krumpelmann 
have no children. 



THOMAS C. HANNAHER. 

Whether the spirit of the times prevailing at the period of a person's 
birth has anything to do with his career is a question the biographer will leave 
to the psychologists and metaphysicians, yet it is worthy of note here that 
Thomas C. Hannaher, a well known and successful grain and flour dealer at 
Lyons. Iowa, was born, as Macaulay, the great English writer, would have 
said, "in the brave days of old," the epoch of the famous "forty-niners," and 
whether that had anything to do with it or not. he has been very successful in 
his life work and has shown a progressive and courageous spirit in overcoming 
life's obstacles. His birth occurred at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, on June 10, 
1849, and he is the son of Patrick and Margaret (O'Conner) Hannaher, both 
born in county Mayo, Ireland, the father on Januaiy 25, 1813, and the mother 
in 1823. Tliey grew to maturity there and were educated in the home schools 
and married there. In order to escape the terrors of the famine of 1848 they 
emigrated to .\merica, and located in Pittsburg. Pennsylvania. Thev lived 
there till 1852. and li\e(l for a short time at St. Charles, Carroll county. 
Illinois. They came to Lyons. Iowa, in 1855 and started a general merchan- 
dise store on the corner of Fourth and Main streets when Lyons was a mere 
hamlet. The father. Patrick Hannaher, was one of the most important and 
influential men in the early days of Lyons' history and did as much, if not 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 783 

more, than any other man in developing" the place. He was looked upon as 
a leader and was a strong and admirable character and carried the farming 
on with credit up to 1861. He was the man who established Main street and 
laid it out in its present position, running due east and west. It formerly 
ang-led to the southeast from Sixth street and the position of the old street 
is still shown. In 1868 he built the Hannaher block, a three-story brick build- 
ing, which was one of the first large blocks in Lyons. At that time a three- 
story brick block w'as quite a novelty in this place, but the town grew rapidly 
and Mr. Hannaher's wisdom in placing faith in its future was jiroven. He 
gave up merchandising in 1861 and entered the grain business, buying and 
selling large quantities of grain wdiich he usually stored in Lyons, — in fact, 
he became one of the leading and best known buyers in the Northwest in his 
day. He built a line of elevators along the northwest and retired from active 
business in 1880. He was highly esteemed by all classes and recognized bv 
all as one of the most prominent men of Lyons in his day and one of the best 
friends of the place. His family consisted of eleven children, named as fol- 
lows : John died in Dakota; Thomas C, of this review; Patrick and Mary 
both died in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania; Charles, James Edward, Mrs. Dehlia 
O'Donnell, Margaret; Mary is deceased; Mrs. Anna Henley; Catherine is a 
Sister of Charity at Lyons, serving under the name of Sister Augusta. 

Thomas C. Hannaher was educated in the public schools of Lyons, low^a, 
completing his education at St. Mary's College, on the lake at Chicago. (This 
institution is not now in existence.) In 1870 he went into business as a 
partner with his father in the grain buying and flour manufacturing business. 
They owmed and operated large elevators and mills on Front street and they 
carried on a very large business. The son took active charge of the business 
in 1880. the father retiring. Thomas C. Llannaher was also engaged in buy- 
ing and shipping live stock. He has been very successful in whatever he has 
engaged in and has long been regarded as one of the leading business men 
of Lyons. He practically retired from active business in 1900, but he still 
looks after his large interests in a general way and has charge of a thriving 
grocery store and a flour and grain business. 

Mr. Hannaher is a loyal and prominent Catholic and he organized the 
Order of Hibernians in Lyons when he was a young man. At a very early 
age he began taking an active part in local politics and when twenty-one years 
of age he was elected alderman of Lyons on the Democratic ticket, and he be- 
came mayor of the city at the age of twenty-six, and for a number of years 
during his active life he was a prominent figure at all political meetings. He 
filled the office of mayor in a manner that reflected much credit upon himself 



784 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA, 

and to the entire satisfaction of all concerned, irrespective of party. He did 
a f reat deal for the good of the city and community, carrying forward in a 
very laudable manner the commendable work begun by his worthy father. 

Mr. Hannaher was married on May 18, 1875. to Martha Jane Edney. 
who was born at Vincennes, Indiana, and who came to Lyons in 1865. Four 
children have been born to this union, namely: Thomas E., William John 
and Leo Patrick ; the two latter are traveling in vaudeville in which they are 
making a great success all over the country ; Anna B. is the daughter. 

The Hannaher is one of the most prominent of the Irish Cathohc families 
in Lyons, and the subject is a man whom it is a delight to meet — clear-headed, 
quick-witted, proud of his father's record, as he should be, for he did much 
for the people who settled in this community in the early days. He loaned 
considerable money, used his influence to bring in capital, and was always gen- 
erous and public-spirited. Mr. Hannaher's father was the man who did great 
things for the Catholic church, furnishing half the money for a fifty-thousand 
dollar building, often furnishing a check for five hundred dollars when things 
looked bad. Mrs. Hannaher has also done the same thing. 



GEORGE V. HAYES. 

There is a class of most useful and enterprising business men in America 
who have lived on farms until long past maturity, then moving to some 
town or city have entered into business. Their training in the economy and 
good management required in successful' farming has fitted them to compete 
in the business world with others, and to wrest successfully compensation 
for their work. Such has been the case with this man, who farmed until 
nearly forty years old and then came to a small town and started in business, 
and has found his efforts crowned with prosperity. 

George V. Hayes was born in Clinton county, Iowa, October 18, 1859, 
a son of Jonathan and Margaret (Johnson) Hayes. His father was born 
in New York in 1812, his mother in Norway in 1841. Jonathan came to 
Clinton county, Iowa, in 1846, and settled on a farm of forty acres and 
added until he had two hundred forty acres at his death. In politics he was 
a Democrat. He was a member of the Christian church and his wife of the 
Lutheran. Six of their eight children are surviving. Jonathan Hayes died 
in 1893; his widow is living. 

George V. Hayes spent his early days on the farm and attended the 




GEORGE V. HAYES 



?t 



.S^ 111 



r-'(V 



\-lD 






CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 785 

public schools. He began when a young man to farm for himself, and now 
owns two hundred thirty-two acres of land. In 1898 he moved to Calamus 
and engaged in the agricultural implement and hardware business. He 
was one of the organizers of the Farmers' Savings Bank and has been its 
president for three vears. He is also interested in the undertaking and fur- 
niture establishment at Calamus, operated in the name of Hayes & Blake. 
In politics he is a Republican and has held the office of township clerk and 
has been a meml)er of the Calamus council. He is a memljer of the Odd 
Fellows and of the Modern Woodmen, also of the American Patriots. 

Mr. Haves was regarded as one of the best farmers in the township when 
engaged in that business, and has since proved his capabilities in the business 
line. He is much esteemed and respected in the community. 



HENRY ASHPOLE. 



Hampshire township. Clinton county, boasts of many successful farmers 
and of many well-kept farms, but of no more successful farmer than the gen- 
tleman whose name heads this re\iew. and of no farm of more prosperous 
appearance than the one of which he is the proprietor. He has applied busi- 
ness methods to farming and has made it very profitable to himself. 

Henry Ashpole was born in Ashtabula county, Ohio, in the town of 
Saybrook, on Xovember 28, 1854, the son of John Ashpole, who was born 
in Lincolnshire, England, June i, 1815, and Jane (Broughton) Ashpole, who 
was born at Huntington, Lincolnshire, England, in 1819. 

John Ashpole was a farmer by occupation and emigrated to Indiana in 
1845. Remaining there for only a short time, he moved to Ohio in 1848, and 
in 1850 came farther west to Clinton county, Iowa. Locating at Clinton, he 
and John Morris started the first lime kiln in the city. Soon after he sold this 
and liought forty acres of tlie Morris seed farm in Lincoln township, which he 
later sold and rented land. Xext he bought eighty acres, on which he lived 
until he became an old man, when he retired and moved to Clinton, where he 
died on June 13, 1897. fie was a man of strong character and well liked by 
those who knew him. 

Jane Broughton had married a Mr. Fisher before becoming the wife of 
Mr. Ashpole, and had by him one son, William Fisher. She bore to Mr. 
Ashpole four children, Frederick. John. Betsy Ann, now Mrs. Cooper, and 
Hemw. 

' (50) 



-86 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

Henry Ashpole was the youngest of the family. He attended the Hamp- 
sliire townslii]) schools and remained on his father's farm until one year after 
his marriage. For three years he rented of his father, then for about the 
same time he rented of Mr. Conner. Tn 1882 he bought ninety acres in Hamp- 
shire townshijx on which he now resides, to which after one year he added 
fort}' acres more, and three years later forty more, making one hundred and 
seventy acres in all. He has erected all the buildings on the farm, a comfort- 
able house and large barns, and has improved the fertility of his soil. For 
manv years he fed each year a large number of cattle. 

Tn local politics ^Ir. Ashpole acts independently of party lines, but since 
Cleveland's second administration he has ^•oted with the Republicans on 
national matters. The voters of his township have chosen him as a member 
of the school board and as township trustee. Fraternally, he is a member of 
the Modern Woodmen of America. 

On February 8, 1877, Henry Ashpole was married to Frances Hughes, 
who w^as born at Sterling. Illinois, on September 6, 1854. the daughter of 
James B. Hughes, an early, settler and farmer. She has been an excellent 
wife and has borne to him the following children : IMrs. Esther Jane Barker, 
Frederick Eugene, Martha, Bess, John B., Frank, Grace, Thomas, Lillie, 
Roland, James (deceased at the age of eighteen months). Russell and Ralph. 
Mr. Ashpole has a family of which any man might well be proud. He is a 
man highly respected locally for his many good qualities, has hosts of friends, 
and has proved himself one of the best financial managers to be found among 
the farmers of his county. Mrs. Ashpole and daughters. Lillie and Martha, 
belong to the Methodist church. 



GEORGE MORRIS. 



In looking over the list of leading farmers and representative citizens of 
Lincoln township. Clinton county, one soon encounters the name of George 
Morris, who has so directed his energies as to entitle him to such recognition 
and who is a man of many strong characteristics. He was born in the city 
of Clinton, this county, on July 2. i860, and he is the son of John and Mary 
(Bigastaff) Morris, both born in England, the father on October 31, 1832, 
and the mother on March 14, 1831. John Morris was primarily a cattle raiser. 
He came with his wife to America in 1856 and located in Clinton, Iowa, and 
lived there fourteen years. He then moved to Lincoln township and spent 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 787 

about ten years on a farm, after which he returned to CHnton, where he Hved 
until his death, in September. 1897. His widow survived him many years, 
dying in July, 19 10. John Morris was a very successful business man and 
accumulated quite a competency. He bought and sold real estate at times, 
and at one time he was the owner of fifteen hundred acres of land in Lincoln 
township, and he often owned as many as four hundred head of cattle at one 
time, which he fed, being known as one of the leading feeders in the county 
for some time. He carried on farming on an extensive scale, too. He had a 
genius for agriculture and was a man whom to know was to admire and 
esteem. He was a loyal Republican, and while often solicited by his friends 
to run for office, he would not do so. preferring" to devote his time exclusively 
to his large affairs. He was prominent here in the early days and did much 
toward the general uplDuilding of the locality. One daughter, Annie, is living 
in Clinton, being one of the first children born there. 

Georsre Morris of this review was educated in the schools of Clinton and 
he attended the Lyons River Institute for a period of two years, and later 
attended school for the same length of time at Faribault, Minnesota, a mili- 
tary school. Thus he became well educated and after leaving college he 
traveled in Europe for two years. Then his father gave him his present 
farm of one hundred and twenty-two acres and he has lived on the same ever 
since. He was tw^enty-two years of age when he took possession of this place 
and he has proved himself to be an agriculturist of no mean ability. Besides 
general farming, he feeds a large number of cattle each year. He has kept 
his place well improved and he always keeps good live stock, being an admirer 
of good horses and some splendid specimens are to be seen about his place. 
He has a beautiful and well-kept home and large and convenient barns and 
outbuildings. He is one of the largest land owners in Lincoln township. 
He spends his time overseeing his large interests, but does no regular w-ork 
himself. He has his affairs under a splendid system and has been very suc- 
cessful in his management. He is a worthy son of a worthy sire and delights 
to recall the early experiences of his honored father, who came from Leister- 
shire. England. When six years of age he began working, his duties being 
to keep the crows and other birds from the grain, and when only nine years of 
age he could support himself. He was a fine example of the truly self-made 
man, and after coming to America he became ver)- prosperous by judicious 
cattle raising. In politics the subject is a Democrat, but he does not aspire 
to public offices. He is a meml^er of the Methodist church and an officer in 
the same. 

Mr. Morris was married on November 21, 1889, to Anna Hayes, a lady 



788 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

of culture and refinement and the representative of an excellent family. She 
was born in England on October 12. 1865, and she is the daughter of Robert 
and Mary Haves. This union has resulted in the l)irth of five children, name- 
ly : Anna Mary. Frances Elizabeth, John Robert, George Eustice and William 
Arthur. 



ROBERT BRUCE KELLY. 

Holding worthy prestige among the young and enterprising farmers of 
Lincoln township, Clinton county, Iowa, is Robert Bruce Kelly, a very worthy 
representative of one of the best known and highly honored families in this 
section of tlie county, whose reputation for probity and industry he has ever 
sought to bear aloft. 

Mr. Kellv is a native of the township where he now resides, his birth hav- 
ing occurred here on September 11, 1881. and he is the son of Robert Kelly, 
Sr., who was born in Pennsylvania in 1841. and who married Kathleen Dill- 
hammer, who was also born in the old Keystone state, in 1848. The paternal 
grandfather, Adam Kelly, was among the pioneers who came to Center town- 
ship. Clinton county, Iowa, in 1853 and took up government land. At that 
time Robert Kelly. Sr.. was twelve years of age, and he grew up on the home 
place, assisting his father to overcome the difficulties incident to the life of all 
first settlers. When twenty-four years of age he bought a farm of his own 
and devoted his life to agricultural pursuits, becoming well fixed, and at the 
time of his death, in 190 = , he was the owner of four hundred and twelve acres 
in Lincoln township, his farm being one of the best improved and most 
desirable in the community, .\lthorgh he carried on general farming on an 
extensive scale, he was mainly a stock man. spending the major part of his 
time feeding cattle for the market, making most of his ample competencv in 
this manner. He Ijecamc widely known in the eastern part of this county as 
a stock man and he had the respect and confidence of all who kneW' him. He 
was a member of the Presbyterian church. His family consisted of the fol- 
lowing children, given in order of birth: David Eldrid. who is now living 
retired near Clinton: Samuel B. lives at Brooking, South Dakota; Richard is 
deceased: Albert Burke, of France. Iowa; Robert Bruce, of this review: Lee 
C. is li\-ing on the home farm. 

Robert P). Kelly, of this sketch, received his education in the public 
schools of Hampshire township, also spent four terms at Dixon College, 
where he applied himself very carefully to his textbooks and made a splendid 



■^^Sp p^^- 





ROBERT KELLY 



msk: 






CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 789 

record. After leaving college he returned to his father's fann and when 
only eighteen years of age he began renting land of his father, continuing in 
this manner for four years. Then he went to western Iowa, locating near 
Laporte City, where he rented a farm. Upon tlie death of his father in 1905 
he returned to Clinton county and received his share of the estate. In Febru- 
ary. 1909, he built a large, attractive, substantial and modern dwelling and 
convenient and well equipped barns, all down the road west of the old home- 
stead, and here he is making his home, being exceptionally well fixed for a 
young man, and he has brought his place up to a high grade of improvement 
in e\'ery respect. He calls the place "Fair View," which name is veiy apro- 
pos, as all who haye seen this veiy desirable and well-kept farm well know. 
It is the yery best of Iowa soil and the buildings are new and tastily arranged. 
Mr. Kelly is a member of the First Presbyterian church of Clinton. 

On March 2, 1904, Mr. Kelly was married to Pearl Hazel Pierson, who 
was born February 9, 1886, in this county, a lady of such estimable traits of 
character that she has always been popular with a wide circle of friends; she 
is the daughter of Elwood and Sadie Pierson. Her father was born in Ohio, 
coming to Chnton, Iowa, later in life, where he worked as switchman in the 
Northwestern yards. For further facts concerning the early history of the 
Kelly family the reader is directed to the sketch of Samuel H. Kelly, of Elvira, 
Iowa, appearing on another page of this work. 



I. \\'ARD POTTER. 



One of the successful young business men of Clinton, Iowa, who has 
forged to the front in spite of obstacles and has ]:)ersisted along legitimate lines 
until he is being abundantly rewarded is J. Ward Potter, the well known 
dealer in wood and coal. He was born in Clinton on Januar^• i. 1887, and 
has spent his life at home, knowing that it would not be worth while to seek 
a better place for business opportunities. He is the son of .\rthur R. and 
Mary E. (Tate) Potter, the former born in Canada in 1854 and died in April, 
1910, and the latter was born in Galesburg. Illinois, in 1858. The father came 
to Clinton when a young man and engaged in the teaming business, first for 
Mart Lily and later for himself. He finally acquired the Chancy Coal Com- 
pany and conducted a general coal, wood and coke business from about 1898 
continuously up to the time of his death. He became well and favorably 
known in Clinton and in 1896 and 1897 he was street commissioner of Clinton. 



790 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

He was a Republican and belonged to the First Methodist Episcopal church, 
being a member of the official board of that church. He belonged to the 
Modern Woodmen of America, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
the American Patriots and Mystic Workers. He was ill for a year and a 
half before his death, Imt bore his sufferings with rare courage and fortitude, 
for he was a man of many strong characteristics and had numerous friends 
wherever he was known. 

Two sons and two daughters were born to Mr. and Mrs. Arthur R. Pot- 
ter, namely: Carrie R.. Harriet B.. Harrison H.. and J. Ward, who was the 
third in order of birth. 

J. Ward Potter received a good education in the Clinton schools, and 
after lea\-ing the school room he \\ent to work for his father in the coal and 
wood business and teaming. In due course of time he became general fore- 
man of the outside work, and upon the death of his father he took charge of 
the entire business, which he is still conducting in an able and successful man- 
ner. He does a general teaming business in connection with his coal and 
wood establishment, and enjoys a very liberal and rapidly growing patronage. 
He hauls all the scenery and baggage for the shows given at the Clinton 
theater, and he also does a big teaming business for the large contracting 
companies. He is an energetic, pleasant, happy-faced young man who makes 
friends readily and has the good will of all who know him. He is a member 
of the Modern Woodmen of America. 

Mr. Potter was married November 9, 1910. to Emma Seebold. of 
Winona, Minnesota. 



ENGVER N. CLAUSEN. 

Though young in years, Engver X. Clausen, a well known grocer of 
Clinton. Iowa, has won definite success and shown what a man with lofty 
])rinciples, honesty of purpose and determination can do by making a per- 
sistent effort, and because of his industry, integrity and courtesy he is a man 
to whom the future holds much of promise and rew-ard. 

Mr. Clausen was born January 7, 1882, in Lyons, a suburb of Clinton, 
Iowa. He is the son of Peter. C. Clausen, who was born in Germany, where 
he was reared, educated and where he married, the date of his birth being 
1853. In i88t he brought his Aoung wife to America and came direct to 
Lyons, Iowa, settling on a farm west of this cit\' \\here he remained for one 
vear, then moved into the town of Lvons. He was a miller bv trade and he 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 79I 

also worked in a sawmill for fifteen years. He has been conducting a harness 
shop for the past two years and has a very good trade. He has always been 
a hard working man and does his work conscientiously. He is a German 
Lutheran, as are all the members of this family. To Mr. and Mrs. Peter C. 
Clausen the following children were born: Mrs. Hannah Boettger. George, 
Engver N. and Carl C. 

Engver X. Clausen enjoyed the advantages of a good education in the 
public schools of Clinton, and. after he had finished, he learned the car- 
penter's trade and worked at the same successfully for four years, but not 
being entirely satisfied with this line of endeavor he sought to enter the mer- 
cantile field and for a period of five }"ears worked in the hardware department 
of the Clinton Saddlery Company. In July. 1909, he and his brother. Carl 
C, bought out the grocery store of Al. K. Madden at No. 716 Main street, 
Lyons, and they have since that time enjoyed a very satisfactory and prosper- 
ous trade, always carrying a complete line of staple and fancy groceries in 
their neat, well arranged store and their trade is rapidly growing. 

Mr. Clausen is a member of the Highland Nobles, the German Workers' 
lodge, and he is <|uartermaster sergeant of Company H, Fifty-third Towa Na- 
tional Guard, and is greatly interested in this work. 

^Ir. Clausen was married on September 9, 1903, to Wilhelmina Petersen, 
who was born May 20, 1885, in Clinton, Iowa. She was the daughter of 
Julius Petersen, who came to Iowa from Germany when a boy, and Mrs. 
Clausen is the granddaughter of William Byers, who was a furniture maker 
and came to Clinton in 1872. Mrs. Clausen was born on the same ground 
where she and her husljand now have their dwelling at No. 403 Third avenue, 
Clinton. They are the parents of two children, namely: Jeanette, born 
March 6, 1905. and Bernerdine, who was born [May 28. 1908. 

Carl C. Clausen, brother and partner in business with Engver N. Clausen, 
was born September 8. 1893. at Lyons, Iowa. He attended school in Lvons, 
but left school early in life to work in the grocery store of Fredericks & Ouin, 
as clerk, where he remained three years, then clerked for M. K. Madden for 
one year and finally, in partnership with his brother. Engver, he purchased 
Maddetfs store. Although very young in years, Carl C. Clausen has a level 
head and having had excellent training from a small bov in the local grocery 
stores he is well equipped for his present work. He floes the buying for the 
firm and is an alert, careful and conscientious young man to whom the future 
holds much of promise in the way of business success. He is verv pleasant 
and genial to customers and he has a host of friends here and in Lyons. 

ti .. ' ^ ■ .:■:.. 



792 CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 

HENRY C. GRIEBEL. 

It has been many years since the family of Henry C. Griebel, an agri- 
culturist, now living on one of the best farms in Orange township, Clinton 
county, crossed the vast ocean from Germany, his native countiT, and sought 
the shores of the New World. They had heard of the opportunities opening 
up in the newer western states and, desiring to benefit themselves and their 
descendants, determined to seek new fields and surround themselves with 
new and be'tter conditions. They possessed all the thrift usually ascribed 
to the Germanic race, and ere many harvest moons had waxed and waned 
they found themselves in good financial' condition, — in fact, prosperous land 
owners and agriculturists. 

Mr. Griebel was born in Germany on July 19, 1864, grew to boyhood 
there and spent one and one-half years in school there. It was in 1870 that 
he accompanied his parents to America and located in Clinton county. Iowa, 
where he continued his education in the public schools. He is the son of 
Fritz Griebel. who was l">orn in Germanx in 1840, the son of Henry and 
Lottie Griebel, both natives of the fatherland, also. They grew to maturity 
in their native land, were educated and married there, and he brought his 
family to America in 1870, locating in Clinton county, where his death 
occurred in 1884, his widow surviving until 1903. Five children were born 
to them, of whom three are still li\ing. He was a farmer, and he and his 
family were members of the Lutheran church. Fritz Griebel was educated 
in Germany and he accompanied the family to America in 1870. and has 
devoted his life to farming. He became the owner of a valuable farm, con- 
sisting of four hundred a-nd fifty acres of land, having begun with eighty 
acres.. In 1898 he came to Grand Mound and has since lived retired. In 
politics he is a Democrat and he and his family are members of the Lutheran 
church. He was married in 1868 to Henrietta Schmidt and they became the 
parents of six children: Henry C, the immediate subject of this sketch: 
William. Gustave, Hermon, .\dolph and Mary. The mother of these chil- 
dren died in 1904, and in igo8 he married Mrs. Anna Frega, a native of 
Germany. 

Henry C. Griebel learned the carpenter's trade in his youth and followed 
that trade until he married, and he has since devoted his time to farming. 
He has met with a large measure of .success, having been a hard worker and 
a good manager, and he is now the owner of one of the best and richest farms 
of the township, consisting of three hundred and twenty acres. He has 
kept his place well improved and has modern farming machinerv and good 




HENRY C. GRIEBEL AND FAMILY 



^ ^E MFW 7r- 






CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 793 

outbuildings for his grain and stock, and a \er\- snl)stantial and comfortable 
dwelling. He has always kept some good grades of live stock of various 
kinds and it is a pleasure to look over his well-kept i)lace. 

In politics Mr. Griebel is a Repubhcan and he has long taken much 
interest in local afifairs, having been school director for about twelve years. 
He is a director in the German Mutual Fire Insurance Company, a stock- 
holder in the Farmers' Savings Bank at Calamus, and is one of the sub- 
stantial and prosperous men of the township, richly deserving the large 
success that has attended his efforts, owing to the fact that he has worked 
long and hard along legitimate lines and that he started with practically 
nothing when he began life for himself. 

Mr. Griebel was married on March 6, 1885, to Lena Schwiem, who was 
born in Clinton county, Iowa, and who is the daughter of Henry and Anna 
Schwien, who came to Scott county, Iowa, in 1856 and located in Clinton 
countv in 1870. Both are now deceased. To Mr. and Mrs. Griebel five 
children have been born, namely: Alma. Hugo, Rudolph, Freddie and 
Anna. Mr. Griebel knows how to enjoy the comforts of life. He not only 
owns good horses and buggies, but also, being up to date, owns a fine auto- 
mobile. 



FRANK L. McCarthy. 

A man of marked business enterprise and capability who carries forward 
to successful completion whatever he undertakes is Frank L. McCarthy, one 
of the popular grocers of Clinton, Iowa. He has long been an important 
factor in business circles and his po])ularity is well deserved, as in him are 
embraced the characteristics of an unabating energy, unbending integrity and 
industry that never flags. 

Mr. McCarthy was hnvn in Clinton, Iowa, February 11, 1889, and has 
spent his life in his home city. He is the son of Patrick H. McCarthy, who 
was born in 1853 ^^ Rochester. New York, and died in igo'8. The paternal 
grandfather. John McCarthy, was a \ery early settler of Clinton, having come 
here in 1856. He was a contractor and was prominent in the early business 
life of this citv. Patrick H. McCarthv came to Clinton with his father when 
he was a baby and here he grew to maturity and was educated in the early 
schools. When he grew to maturity he became a grocer, in 1888. owning a 
store at the corner of Ninth avenue and Fourth street, and there he worked 
up an excellent trade and became fairly well-to-do, continuing in this line of 



794 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

endeavor until 1908, in which year his death occurred. He was a meml^er 
of the Cathohc church, the Knights of Columhus, the Cathohc Foresters and 
the Modern Woodmen. He was an honest, energetic man whom his many 
customers and friends held in the highest respect. 

The family of Patrick McCarthy consisted of seven children, of whom, 
Frank L. of this review was the second in order of hirth; the other three sons 
and three daughters are. Agnes, a nun at Waterloo, Iowa; Irene; Catherine; 
John L., who is now eighteen years old and is associated with his brother, the 
subject, in business in Clinton ; Paul is six years old, and Noel is four. 

Frank L. McCarthy has enjoyed the advantages of an excellent education, 
having attended St. Mary's parochial school at Clinton, Iowa, also the Clinton 
high school, from which he was graduated with the class of 1908. During 
all his life, when not in school, he had worked in his father's grocery store and 
was well informed concerning this line of endeavor and the general business of 
such a store when his father died, which e\'ent occurred one month before 
Frank L.'s graduation from high school. I^lnis being well prepared in point 
of training and education, young McCarthy took up the active management 
of the store and has managed it \\'ith Acr}- gratifying results since that time 
to the present; however, he soon changed the location of the store to No. 814 
South Fourth street and took on a much larger stock, taking his younger 
brother in as a partner, and the firm name became F. L. & J. L. McCarthy. 
The trade and profits have doubled since the subject took charge of the store 
and he has been notably successful for so young a man, and, judging from his 
splendid record in the past, the future will doubtless have in store much larger 
things for him. His pleasant manners and sunny, Irish disposition, coupled 
with his known integrity and desire to please, renders him popular with his 
many customers, and he is in e\'ery respect deserving of the large success 
that has attended his efforts. 



CHARLES C. BINGHAM. 

The career of Charles C. Bingham, a well known business man of Clin- 
ton, Iowa, clearly illustrates the possibilities that are open in this country to 
earnest, persevering men who have the courage of their convictions and are 
determined to be the architects of their own fortunes. He was l)om in Jones 
county. Iowa. March i, 1874, and is the son of Calvin H. and Mary L. (Joslin) 
Bingham, the former born in the state of New York, February 4, 1829, and 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 795 

the latter in Michigan October 22. 1837; she is still living, but Mr. Bingham 
passed to his reward on November j, 1905. Calvin H. Bingham was a con- 
tractor and builder and was noted in this line for his superior ability and his 
constant desire to please his patrons. When a young man he came west to 
Anamosa, Iowa, and worked there as a wagonmaker for several years, then 
for a period of eight years he lived on a fami. In 1894 he moved to Clinton, 
Iowa, and began operations as a contractor and builder. He was a veteran of 
the Civil war, having been a member of Company F. California Cavalry, and 
he ser\-ed very faithfully in the Southwest, principally against the Indians. 
Politically, he was a Democrat. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Calvin H. Bingham four sons and one daughter were 
born, named in order of birth as follows: Ralph E.. Fred \\'.. Charles C. (of 
this review). Bertha E. and E. Frank. 

Charles C. Bingham began his education in the Jones county public 
schools and completed it in the Clinton Business College. As a young man 
he worked on his father's farm and learned the carpenter's trade, also. Finally 
he began clerking in the drug store of J. W. Evans, with whom he remained 
for seven and one-half years on South Fourth street, Clinton. On January 
I. 1910. he started a grocery store at No. 534 South Sixth street, Lyons, Iowa, 
where he built up an excellent patronage. He disposed of the grocery busi- 
ness February i. 1911. since which time he has been associated with the drug 
firm of John J. Blodt & Company of Clinton. 

Mr. Bingham is a Blue Lodge Mason and he is a member of the ?\Iacca- 
bees. He was married on June 3. 1908, to Emma Belle Scott, who was born 
in Clinton, Iowa, the daughter of William H. and ^Mary Scott. Her father is 
an electrician on the Chicago & Xorthwestern electric lighted train. To ^Ir. 
and ]\rrs. Bingham one child has 1)een lx)rn. named Scott Calvin, whose birth 
occurred January 12. 1909. 



TOHN W. SMITH. 



Perhaps no resident of Center township is better or more favorably 
known than the enterprising young farmer and representative citizen whose life 
story is briefly told in the following lines. The family of which he is an hon- 
ored representative is of English origin and has not been known so xevy long 
in America, but no better citizens have come to Clinton county from foreign 
shores than thev. 



796 ' CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

John W. Smith was born in Berhn township, Chnton county, on January 
25, 1870, and he is the son of John and Mary (Martin) Smith and the grand- 
son of David and Rebecca (Wilhs) Smith, natives of Lincohishire, England, 
in which country they spent their hves and where they were hving when sum- 
moned to take up their abode in the mystic beyond. John was the eldest of a 
family of three children, and his birth occurred in Lincolnshire, England, 
November 30, 1829. In the year 1852 he emigrated to America, soon after- 
wards coming west and locating at Sabula, Iowa, where he found employ- 
ment with the Northwestern railroad, later working for the Illinois Central. 
He worked at different occupations and at different places until 1863, when he 
came to Clinton county and settled on one hundred and sixty acres of land in 
section 12, Berlin township, which he had purchased from the government and 
where he continued to reside until he removed to De Witt where he purchased 
a good property and where he has continued to reside, living retired. He put 
extensive improvements on his farm, and by econoni}- and energy together 
with the active co-operation of his good helpmeet he has been enabled to add 
to his original purchase until at the present time he is the proprietor of four- 
teen hundred and forty-tw'O acres of good tillable land in Clinton county. The 
parents of the subject were married in Bloomfield township. Clinton county, 
March 20. 1867. The mother was born in Pennsylvania May 18. 1840. To 
their union five children were born. z\lbert, John W.. Willard. Lizzie (now 
Mrs. Henry Schmidt) and Robert. 

John W. Smith received a good common school education and remained 
on the home farm w ith his parents until 1898. On January 28, 1902. he was 
married to Emma Levisen, daughter of Christian and Minnie ( Clasan ) Levi- 
sen. Mrs. Smith's father was born in Schleswig, Germany. April 25. 1840. 
He emigrated from Liverpool. England, with his parents. Lawrence and Anna 
Cathrina (Sebbance) Levisen. in 1852. and located in Clinton county, Iowa, 
near Bryant, at which place the grandparents died, the death of the grand- 
father occurring on September 2, 1882. and that of the grandmother on March 
9. 1890. Mrs. Smith's parents were married on Januarv 7. 1863. Her 
mother was born on No\-ember 26. 1843. Mrs. Smith's parents, having re- 
tired from the farm, now reside at De Witt. Both are members of the Ger- 
man Lutheran church, and politically Mr. Levisen is a Democrat. They were 
the parents of seven children, one of whom. Anna, is deceased ; those living 
are. Lawrence; Dora L.. widow of Heniy Christiansen, deceased; Charlie F. ; 
Anna C. w'lie of Burns Murphy; Emma AI.. wife of John \\'. Smith; and 
William C. 

Mr. and Mrs. Smith 1:!egan their married life on their jiresent farm of 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 797 

two Inindred vnd tliirtx' acres, which is located just west of Elvira. Center 
townshij). He has brought this place up to a high state of improvement and 
carries on general farming and stock raising in a manner that stamps him as 
being fully abreast of the times. He has always worked hard and managed 
well and he has a very convenient and cozy dwelling and substantial out- 
buildings He keeps a good grade of live stock and his place is one of the 
most desirable in the community. 

Mr. Smith takes an abiding interest in all public matters and in politics 
he is a Democrat and is acti\e in party work. He at present is one of the 
trustees of his township. His wife is a member of the English Lutheran 
church, of which ]\Ir. Smith is an attendant and liberal contributor. They are 
the parents of three children, Wesley, born April i, 1903 ; Marie, born Novem- 
ber 19. 1904. and Robert, born April 30. 1910. 



CARL lORGEXSEX. 



The gentleman whose name forms the caption of this review is a factor 
of no small importance in the business life of Lyons. Iowa, his record as a 
straightforward merchant and upright citizen entitling him to an honored 
place in the life of the community. He is a young man. has had the ad- 
vantages of a present-day education, and his trained brain and industrious 
habits are bringing him success and the esteem of his fellow men. 

Carl Jorgensen is a native of Clinton, Iowa, ha\ing been born nn July 24. 
1884. He is the son of Louis and >\Iary (Yuhl) Jorgensen. l)Oth born in 
Denmark, the father on Fel)ruary 9, 1858. They are both still living. They 
were married in the old country, where they were educated and grew to ma- 
turitv anfl s])ent their early life. They emigrated to America and located in 
Clinton, Iowa, where they became \ery comfortably established. Louis 
Jorgensen conducted a general feed and flour mill in Clinton with a large de- 
gree of success, until 1907, when he retired. He is a member of the Danish 
Lutheran church. His family consists of one son. Carl, of this re^'iew, and 
two daughters, Evira and Mrs. Minnie Nissen. 

Carl Jorgensen was educated in the public schools of Clinton, and after 
leaving the school room he worked in a printing office for two years, but not 
taking any too kindly to this line of endeavor he turned his attention to 
merchandising, and first clerked in the groceries of Hans Peper and M. A. 
Nissen, respectively, and thereby accjuired a complete knowledge of this line 



798 ' CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

of work, which has stood him in good stead in his subsequent hfe. Saving 
his money and leaving nothing neglected whereby he could advance his knowl- 
edge of the business, he was enabled in 1908 to purchase the grocery of F. W. 
Damour. taking up the store and trade where the former left off, and he has 
continued the same with very satisfactory results, building up the stock and 
increasing the patronage of the store until he is now one of the busiest grocers 
in the city. He conducts a general grocery, flour and feed store on South 
Sixth street, Lyons. His place is managed under an excellent system and 
general satisfaction is given, at all times, to his many customers, for here they 
know they get a square deal, which has ever been Mr. Jorgensen's watchword. 

Mr. Jorgensen was married on September 11, 1908, to Agnes John, who 
w-as born in Clinton, Iowa, February 14, 1888. the daughter of Henr}^ and 
Catherine John, natives of Germany and a highly respected family. 

Mr. Jorgensen is a member of the Danish society, also the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Woodmen 
of the World, and he stands high in all of these worthy organizations. 



RICHARD J. GIBSON. 

Richard J. Gibson, well known citizen of Center township, Clinton county, 
is one who, endow^ed by nature with the qualities w^hich insure success, has 
made good use of his natural advantages. Perhaps there is no career which 
excites more interest than that of the farmer lad. Strong, healthy in mind 
and body, filled with ambition, he starts out with full assurance that he can 
achieve his ideals, and, as the history of our broad land has shown, often, 
indeed, his hopes are realized and he is crowned with success in the field of his 
chosen endeavor. Such a youth was the one w' e review. Commencing his 
life work with his father's farm, he there learned all the varied departments of 
an agriculturist's work, and then in early manhood, alone and practically un- 
aided, he started upon his own account to make his way in the world, with 
what success it is the purpose of this narrative to show. 

Mr. Gibson was born on February 10, 1844, i^i Butler county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and he is the scion of a sterling old family of the Keystone state, being 
the son of William R. and Martha (McChesney) Gibson. These parents 
grew to maturity, w^ere educated and married in the East, and in 1852 they 
came to the rapidly developing Middle West, locating in Jackson county. Iowa, 
bringing their family of six children, whose names are given as follows: 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 799 

Robert M., Thomas J.. Josiah H.. Joseph L.. Richard J. (of this review), 
WiUiam R. (deceased), and Samuel AI. (deceased). The father purchased 
land in Jackson county, near Andrew, where he and his wife spent the re- 
maining years of their lives, engaged in farming and stock raising. Robert, 
William and Samuel Gibson all served in the Civil war. The father, William 
R. Gibson, was a Republican in politics and he and his wife were members of 
the United Presbyterian church. They were highly respected people and well 
known among the early settlers. 

Richard J. Gibson, of this sketch, received a common school education 
and grew to maturity on the home farm, which he worked when a boy, assist- 
ing in the development of the same from the wilderness and with the general 
crops during the summer months, attending the neighboring schools in the 
wintertime. On October lo, 1872, he married Malissa Hamilton, daughter 
of George and Rebecca (Strain) Hamilton, of Jackson county, Iowa, who 
were natives of Pennsylvania, from which state they came to Jackson county, 
Iowa, in 1855, being among the early and best known settlers of the county. 
Thev were the parents of ten children, seven sons and three daughters. Mr. 
Gibson began his married life on his farm of eighty acres in Center township, 
which he sold in 1881 and in 1886 purchased five hundred acres just west of 
Elvira. He was successful from the first and as he prospered he farmed on a 
larger scale. His present fine farm consists of four hundred and sixty acres, 
which he has placed under modern and high class improvements in every 
respect, it being considered one of the best kept and most desirable farms in 
the county. It is thoroughly drained with tile. He has a large, attractive and 
comfortable dwelling and a convenient and substantial group of outbuildings. 
His large, well kept, shady, shrub-covered lawn is beautiful to the passerby, 
and everything about his place indicates taste, thrift and excellent manage- 
ment, in fact, this is a model farm. Mr. Gibson buys, raises and feeds much 
stock, keeping the best grades of all kinds, and he grazes large herds of cattle 
each year. No small part of his annual income is derived from live stock. 

The United Presbyterian church has the support and holds the member- 
ship of Mr. Gibson and his family. In politics he is a Republican, and he is 
well read on current topics, having become a well informed man on political 
and civic topics and the world's best literature. He has never sought political 
office, preferring to devote his attention exclusively to his individual affairs. 

Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Gibson. William B., 
Florence L. and Myra M., all living at home. They are well educated; the 
son, William B., took a commercial course at Clinton and Florence attended 
college at Monmouth, Illinois. 



337560B 



800 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

GIDEON ALONZO RUSSELL. 

This veneral)le and highly honored citizen of Lyons, Clinton county, 
is eminently entitled to conspicuous mention in this history, owing to the 
fact that he is a pioneer of this section, having seen and participated in the 
development of the same from the early days. The life he has led is one of 
commendation and worthy of emulation by younger generations, for it has 
been led along lines of usefulness and integrity. He is an interesting talker 
on the early conditions here and of the subsequent development of the county. 
He has been successful in the various lines of endea^'or to which he has ad- 
dressed himself and is worthy of the universal esteem in which he is held. 

Mr. Russell hail's from the old Empire state and is a scion of a sterling 
family of the same, his birth having occurred in Otsego county. New York, 
January 25. 1828. He is the son of Gideon H. and Waitstill (Pierce) Rus- 
sell. His father was born in the state of New York and there he grew to 
maturity, was educated in the old-time schools and married, — in fact, spent 
his life there engaged in agricultural pursuits, and he and his wife died in 
that state. 

Gideon A. Russell was reared on the home farm, where he assisted 
with the general work about the place during his boyhood days, and when a 
young man he learned the carpenter's trade, and when twenty-six years old, 
in 1854, he came to Clinton county, Iowa, settling at Lyons, and established 
a sash and door shop, which he maintained for a period of thirty-five years 
and was very successful, enjoying an excellent and ever increasing business. 
He turned out a \'ery fine grade of work and was very careful to please his 
patrons in every respect, alw^ays honest and obhging in his dealings. In 1.861 
he built and established a factory for making sashes and doors, also dressing 
lumber, his place of business being next to the present public square of Lyons. 

In 1889 Mr. Russell began dealing in farm loans and real estate business, 
and in a small way he continues the same at present. He has been successful 
in this line of Endeavor and now in the declining years of his life he finds 
himself very comfortably situated in his cozy home at No. 300 South Fifth 
street, Lyons. Politically, he is independent, and while he lias always taken 
more than a passing interest in political and ])ul;ric affairs, he has not been 
an office-seeker. 

Mr. Russell was married on March 16. 1854, to Mary Pier, of Otsego 
county. New York, who was born January 5, 1838. To this union five chil- 
dren were born, namely: George E.. who died in 1874; Alice, who died in 
1860: Ada. who died in 1870; Fannie J., the wife of .Alonzo Firman, of 




GIDEON A. RUSSELL 



1- . 



AS o 



:;y ! 






>- 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 8oi 

Lvons ; l-red A., whu is a well-known author and li\es in Xew York. The 
mother of these chihh'en passed to her rest on November 14, 1871. and ^Ir. 
Russell' was married on January 21, 1874. to Emaline Kellogg, of Otsego 
county. Xew York. To the last union two children were l)urn, Lynn" K., 
of Clinton, Iowa, and Gertrude, wife of Frank Albam, li\ing in Alarshall- 
town, Iowa. 



LOUIS J. BORMANN. 

One of the suljstantial citizens of Lyons, Iowa, is the gentleman to a 
review of whose life work the attention of the reader is now called, Louis 
J. Bormann, well known grocer, who, though a young man. has forged ahead 
and is winning the confidence and esteem of those with whom he has dealings. 
W'liile advancing his own interests, he does not lose sight of the fact that it 
is his duty to lend his influence in furthering the interests of his communit}'. 

Mr. Bormann was Ijorn in L}'ons, Clinton county, December 9, i'887. 
He is the son of Jacob Bormann, who was born in Germany, on the banks of 
"the lovely castled Rhine river." He was a stock Ijuyer by occupation and he 
spent most of his life in America, having come to our shores with his parents 
when twelve years of age. They located on a farm near Sugar Creek, Iowa, 
where Jacob was reared, educated and where he Axorked on the home place. 
A\'hen he reached man's estate he moved to Lyons, Iowa, and started a grocery 
store in the Hannaher block.. He met with success, but finallv sold out and 
became a grain and stock l)U}er and did an extensive business in this direction. 
He served three years as a soldier in the Ci\il war, being a member of Com- 
pany K, Twenty-sixth Iowa \^olunteer Infantry, and he was wounded four 
times, but recovered. He saw some hard ser\ice and was in manv great bat- 
tles, being also with Sherman on his march to the sea. He was a German 
Catholic in religious matters. His death occurred when his son, Louis J., was 
a small lad. 

Louis J. Borman has three brothers and two sisters, namelv : AI. B. lives 
in Clinton; John J. is a traveling salesman; Frank J. is railroading; Airs. 
Christina Schoenfeller ; Airs. Lena AI. Anderson. 

The subject was educated in St. Bonica's parochial school at Lvons. and 
after leaving the school room to l^egin life for himself he started out as a 
clerk in C. H. Wulf's retail grocery store in Lyons, remaining there three 
years. He then spent (jne year in a dry goods store and one and one-half 
years in a tea and coffee store as clerk. All the while he was laving u]) a 

(51) 



802 CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 

valuable store of information for subsequent use in tbe mercantile world. He 
and bis brotber Jobn J. opened a grocery store in Lyons under tbe firm name 
of Bormann Brotbers. Tbey continued in business only a sbort time, wben 
tbev sold out and Louis J. went to Wyoming and Montana, wdiere be re- 
mained one year, principally to ascertain wbether be liked tbe business and 
otber conditions tbere. Believing tbat be could succeed better in bis borne 
countrv, be returned to Lyons in tbe spring of 1907 and opened a grocery 
store in this town, in partnership witb bis brotber, F. J. He bought out the 
latter in 1908 and since tbat time has conducted tbe business alone and is 
enjoying a very liberal patronage .wdiicb is constantly increasing. He keeps a 
neat and up-to-date stock and is known as a young man whose word can 
be relied upon and whose good intentions cannot be cjuestioned. He is a 
genial and progressive gentleman whom customers like to patronize because of 
bis integrity and pleasant manners. He is a member of the Catholic church 
and of the Woodmen of the World. 

Mr. Bormann was married on June 14, 1910, to Emma M. Galbraith, 
who was born in Clinton county, Iowa, tbe daughter of Henry H. Galbraith, 
a well established farmer of this countv. 



EDWARD JOSEPH HALE. 

Among tbe citizens of Clinton, Iowa, whose lives have been led along 
such worthv lines of endea\'or tbat they have endeared themselves to their 
fellow citizens, thereby being eligible for representation in a volume of this 
nature, is tbe gentleman whose name appears above, a man who has worked 
bard for what he has achieved and who is eminently deserving of tbe large 
success that he has achieved. 

Edward Joseph Hale, well known grocer of this city, was born in Port- 
land, Connecticut, October 15, 1867, being of a most excellent family of the 
old Nutmeg state. Lie is the son of Joseph and Rosella (Edwards) Hale, tbe 
former born in Connecticut, in May, 1844, of good Yankee blood, and the 
mother was Ijorn in the same state in June, 1848, also of a sterling New Eng- 
land family. Joseph Hale owned a small farm and raised tobacco and in 1874 
he emigrated with his family to Cedar county, Iowa, where he bought a farm 
and managed it until 1885, when he moved to Clinton, this county, and was 
engaged in gardening for the city markets until 1885. wben be entered the 
grocery business at No. 548 Second avenue, remaining in business until June, 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA, 803 

1910, when he sold out and prepared to move to Washington and retire from 
active life. He has worked hard and managed well and therefore he has an 
ample competency for his declining years. 

Two sons were l)()rn to Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Hale, Edward J., of this 
review, and William Louis, wlio owned a grocery store at Xo. 214 South 
Fourth street. Ijut who is now li\ing retired and owns a large ranch in the 
West. 

Edw^ard J. Hale was educated in the common schools of Cedar county, 
Iowa, and there grew to maturity on the home farm. He came to Clinton 
with his father in 1885 ^^'""^ f*'^' ^ period of five years assisted him in garden- 
ing. He then learned the printer's trade, but not fancying the ''art preserva- 
ti\"e"' as a life work, he al)andoned the case and began working as a brakeman 
for the Northwestern railroad, being thus employed for a period of five years. 
Tiring of the hardships attending the life of a railway trainman, Mr. Hale 
finally entered the grocery business at No. 550 Second avenue, Clinton, and 
here he has kept a popular, well furnished and well managed store, and has 
been very successful, being a man of progressive ideas and honorable and con- 
siderate in his dealings v ith the public. His store is patronized by Clinton's 
best people. 

Politically, Mr. Hale is a Democrat ; he is commander in the ]\Iaccabee 
lodge, and is a member of the First Methodist church of Clinton. 

Mr. Hale was united in marriage with Mary Huber on June 15, 1893. 
She was liorn ^^larch 9, 1870, at Elgin. Illinois, and is the daughter of Charles 
and Eva Huber. Her father, who is a tailor by trade, was born in Baden, 
Germany, but has spent much of his life in America. Mr. and Mrs. Hale 
have one child, Bruce Edward, who was born March 30. 1896. The Hale 
family perpetuates the name Edward in eveiy generation. 



MATTHEW J. ^lELVIX. 

The gentleman to whom the l)iographer now calls the reader's attention 
was not favored l)y inherited wealth or the assistance of influential friends, 
but in s])ite of this, by perseverance, industry and wise economy, he has at- 
tained a comfortable station in life and is well and fa\-oral3ly known in ])usi- 
ness. social and other circles of Clinton, as a result of the industrious life he 
has lived here and the consistent course he has followed. 

]Matthew I. IMehin. a thriftv grocer of this citv, was l)orn in I^elaware 



804 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

City, Delaware. Deceml^er 6. 1856. He is the son of Owen and Bridget 
(Rogan) Melvin, who were hoth lioni in county Shgo, Ireland, where they 
grew to maturity, were educated and where they married young in life, soon 
afterwards moving to Scotland where they lived a few years, Mr. Melvin 
Avorking as a general laborer. In 1854 they emigrated to America and located 
in Delaware City, Delaware, where they were soon the owners of a comfortable 
home. During the Civil war, Mr. Melvin assisted in Iniilding a number of 
fortifications for the Union, especially in the vicinity of Delaware City and at 
Key West, Florida, also other similar work for the United States govern- 
ment. In 1863 he and his family moved to Clinton county, Iowa, where he 
continued to reside until his death in 1901. His wife is also dead. He was 
a stanch and ironclad Democrat in political affairs, and he and his wife were 
members of the Roman Catholic church. They were the parents of only two 
children. Matthew J. of this review, and a daughter, Catherine, who married 
Peter Rimmer, of Clinton, Iowa. This couple died, leaving two children, 
Helen, who now lives with Matthew J. Melvin, of this review, and teaches 
school ; and Lawrence, who now carries on a transfer business in Clinton. 

Matthew J. Melvin received his early education in the common schools 
of Clinton county and then attended the Metropolitan College at Chicago, 
taking a general business course. Thus well equipped for a business career 
and inclining toward a mercantile life, he began clerking in a retail grocery 
store in Chicago and there learned the foundations of the mercantile business. 
He remained in Chicago eleven years, then came to Clinton, Iowa, and worked 
in the Callan groceiy store for sixteen years, gixing entire satisfaction as a 
courteous and able clerk, popular with the patrons of the store. In 1907 he 
bought out his employer at X^o. 914 South Fourth street, Clinton, and has since 
been successfully engaged in the grocery business at this place, ha\'ing one 
of the best known and 1)est stocked stores in the city, which is patronized by 
the best people in this vicinity. 

Mr. Melvin is a Democrat, but has never aspired to oflices of public 
trust and emolument. He is a member of the Catholic church and the 
Knights of Columbus, also the Catholic Order of Foresters. 

Mr. Melvin was married on April 30. 1886. to Mary Rogan, who was 
born in Chicago, on May i,-i859, the daughter of William and Sarah Rogan, 
natives of Ireland. Mrs. Melvin died on her birthday, when only twenty-nine 
years old. She was an estimable character and had hosts of friends. One 
child born to this union died when very young. 

Mr. ]\Ieh'in is known to the business world here as a man whose integrity 
is unassailable and he has the undivided respect of all who know him. 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 805 

WILLIAM S. RICE. 

Among the farmers of Center township, tlie "garden spot of Chnton 
conntv." none is more efficient nor l)ears a more respected name than Mr. Rice. 
The son of one of the ahlest farmers and most worthy residents of the town- 
ship, he has himself in ah respects proved him.self a crecHt to the stock from 
wliich he sprnng. 

\\^ilham S. Rice was l^orn on March 3. 1865. in Chnton comity, the son 
of John F. and Ehza (Hice) Rice, hoth natives of Pennsyh-ania. John F. 
Rice was l)orn on September 15, 1*825, his wife on Jnne 7, 1828. They were 
married on Febrnary 13, 1851, and emigrated to Chnton county on March 4, 
1864. For four years Mr. Rice rented land, then purchased a farm of eighty 
acres one-half mile east of Elvira, on which he has lived continuously since 
1867. \\dien purchased, the farm was poorly improved, but he has by careful 
management and industry improved it and brought his soil up to a higher fer- 
tilitv. There is a large maple grove near his residence which he planted from 
seed, and which has reached a height of sixty to ninety feet, and this with the 
various kinds of fruit and shrubbery surrounding the home give to it the ap- 
pearance of a long established homestead, which it is. John F. Rice is enjoying 
good health at the age of eighty-five, his wife at eighty-two, a much respected 
couple. One of his brothers, Conrad, is living at Elvira, aged ninety-three, 
another, \Mlliam F., lives at Clinton, wlfile his sister, Mrs. Mary Fulton, the 
remaining member of the family, is li\'ing in the state of Delaware. Mrs. 
Rice's parents were natives of Pennsylvania, and had a family of eight chil- 
dren, of whom five are li^•ing. Three of her l^'others ser\-ed in the Civil war, 
one of whom died from a long confinement in Andersonville prison. Both 
Mr. and ]\Irs. Rice are meml^ers of the Lutheran church at Elvira, and are 
reckoned among its strongest supporters. They were the ])arents of five 
children, all of whom died young of diphtheria, except William S. 

W^illiam S. Rice, with tlie exception of two years spent in western 
Nebraska, has made his home with his parents, being unmarried, and has 
charge of the farm. He is also the owner of a complete threshing outfit, which 
he finds a profitable investment. Active in all public enterprises, he is one of 
the well known and respected young men of his county, and has served as 
school director and secretary of the school board for some years. In 1890 
and 1900 he took the census of his township for the government. Mr. Rice 
is well read and well informed on all subjects. His religious affiliations are 
with the Lutheran church, and he takes a prominent part in the activities of 
the church, as do all the members of the Rice family. 



8o6 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

PETER J. OWENS. 

xA. native son of Clinton connty, and one of the prosperous farmers and 
representative citizens of the community in which he resides, the subject of 
this sketch was born on the family homestead in Hampshire township, Sep- 
tember I, 1855. His father, James Owen, was born in Ireland in the year 
181 5, and married there, when a young man, Bridget Gallagher, who was also 
a native of the Emerald Isle. Not long after this marriage, these parents 
emigrated to the United States, and in the early fifties came to Clinton county, 
Iowa, and settled in Hampshire, where Mr. Owens bought one hundred and 
sixty acres of land, which he improved, and on which he lived and prospered 
until 1890, when he turned the farm over to his son, Peter, and moved to 
Lyons, where he spent the remainder of his days in retirement, dying in the 
month of June, 1909. He was a man of industrious and frugal habits, 
achieved gratifying success as a tiller of the soil, and stood high in the esteem 
and confidence of his neighbors and fellow citizens. A Roman Catholic in 
religion, he was active in the work of his church, also manifested a commend- 
able interest in the affairs of his township and at one time served as trustee of 
the same. James and Bridget Owens had two children, Mrs. Anna McLaugh- 
lin, of Scott county, this state, and Peter J., whose name introduces this sketch. 

Peter J. Owens' early life was spent on the farm which he now owns, 
and he grew to maturity in close touch with the soil and with well defined 
ideas of the duties and responsibilities which he would ultimately assume as a 
man and citizen. His labor in the fields was varied during certain months by 
attendance at the district schools of his neighborhood, and after attaining his 
majority he worked for some time on the home farm for his father. Later 
he left the parental roof and was absent seven years, at the expiration of 
which period he returned home and assumed the management of the farm, 
and after the death of his father he succeeded to the homestead, which, as 
already stated, he now owns. The place which contains two hundred and 
forty acres of very fine land, lies in one of the most productive agricultural 
districts of Hampshire township and is admirably adapted to general farming 
and stock raising, comparing favorably with any like number of acres in the 
county. The buildings are substantial and up-to-date, the fencing is of best 
quality, and the excellent condition of the soil, together with the general ap- 
pearance of thrift which pervades the farm throughout, bear testimony to 
the enterprise of the proprietor and indicates to the passerl)y a modern Ameri- 
can home, in which thrift, content and hospitality abound. 

Mr. Owens, like his father before him, is a Catholic in his religious be- 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 807 

Hef and a loyal son of the mother church, his family being identified witli the 
same. He is zealous in the various lines of good work under the auspices of 
the church, including the Knights of Columbus, a fraternal and benevolent 
order of great merit, and also lends his aid and influence to further all meas- 
ures for the material prosperity of the community and the social and moral 
advancement of his fellowmen. The domestic life of Mr. Owens dates from 
1880, in April of which year was solemnized his marriage with Alary A. 
Laughery. of Elk River township. Clinton county, and a daughter of Patrick 
and Mary Laughery, whose ancestors Avere nati\-es of Ireland. Five children 
are the pledges of this union, namely: John J., Clara. Leo P., Dorin and 
Alice, all living. Those doing for themselves are well settled in life and 
greatly esteemed in their respective places of residence. 

Leo Peter Owens, second son and third child of Peter J. and Bridget 
(Laughery) Owens, was born in Lyons, Clinton county, Iowa, on the 21st 
day of February. 1886. As indicated in the preceding sketch, his family is 
one of the oldest and best known in the township of Hampshire, nearly, if not 
C[uite, sixty years having dissolved in the mists of the past since his grand- 
father, James Owens, left the Emerald Isle and established a home in the 
sparsely settled county of Clinton, now one of the finest and most progressive 
counties of eastern Iowa. At the proper age, young Leo entered the public 
schools of Lvons, which he attended for some vears. the training he received 
being afterwards supplemented by a course in the Sisters' school, under the 
auspices of the Catholic church at the same place. Having early manifested 
a decided preference for agriculture, he turned his attention to the same on 
arriving at an age to begin life for himself, and for some time thereafter 
cultivated a part of the family homestead in Hampshire township. Since 
1907, however, he has been running a farm of one hundred and sixt}' acres in 
the southern part of said township, his success the meanwhile being very 
encouraging, as is indicated Ijy the thrifty condition of his farm and the in- 
fluential place he occupies among the leading agriculturists and stock raisers 
of the locality in which he resides. 

Air. Owens is enterprising and puljlic spirited, not only as a farmer, but 
as a citizen, and ever since attaining his majority he has kept in touch with 
the times on the leading questions before the people and the issues on which 
men and parties divide. In state and national affairs he is a Democrat, but 
in matters local, he lets politics cut no figure, giving his support to the candi- 
dates best Cjualified for the offices to which they aspire, irrespective of party 
ties. Fraternally he belongs to the Woodmen of the World, and religiously 
the Catholic church holds his creed. Reared under the influence of the mother 



8o8 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

church, he has endeavored to make his hfe reflect its principles and teachings, 
and he is today among the influential members of the congregation, with which 
bodv his wife and children are also identified. 

On June 2'8, 1901, Air. Owens was united in the holy bonds of wedlock 
with Susie Manning, of Clinton county, the marriage being blessed with four 
children, namelv : Alary Gertrude, James Legora, Joseph Francis and Helen 
Margaret. Air. and Airs. Owens are quite popular and move in the best social 
circles of the community in which they reside. Although primarily interested 
in their own children, whom they are endeavoring to rear to lives of useful- 
ness and honor, they are not unmindful of the welfare of others. E\-ery 
laudable means for the moral advancement of the young people of their neigh- 
borhood is sure to enlist their co-operation and support, and in their daily lives 
thev exempli fv principles of honor and integrity, which bespeak a high 
standard of manhood and womanhood. 



THOAIAS D. GRUAISTRUP. 

In this review is mentioned another member of a very worthy family 
who ha\'e demonstrated their worth in numerous ways. He is descended 
from clean Danish ancestry, from that nation which has above most others 
cause to be proud of the character of its people, a nation of honest, sober, 
intelligent. God-fearing people, whose general intelligence, standard of edu- 
cation and common morality is higher than that of almost any European 
nation, for they have not set to work to colonize and exploit all the other 
portions of the world which they could obtain, but have been content with 
modest colonial ventures, and ha\e given the time, monev. and attention 
which other nations devote to colonization to the development of their home 
country, with results which the world can plainly notice in the development 
of their citizens and of their natural resources. The Grumstrup family are 
splendid representatives of that stock. 

Thomas D. Grumstrup was born in Denmark, December 8, 1868, a 
son of Xis N. Grumstrup, for whom see sketch of W^alda AI. Grumstrup. 
Thomas was five years old when the family came to America and located in 
Clinton. He learned the woodworker's or cabinetmaker's trade, and until 
1906 was an employe of Curtiss Brothers, when he and one of his brothers 
started a cabinetmakers' shop known as Hansen, Grumstrup & Companv, 
which lasted about fourteen months. Then the family virtuallv bought 




HENRY WARNING 
WALDA M. GRUMSTRUP THOMAS D. GRUMSTRUP 



a ^ 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 809 

out the entire Anderson luirnitnre Company, and Tliomas Grumstrui) was 
made vice-president. The company has since heen prosperous. He is inde- 
pendent in politics, is a meml)er of the Danisli Brotlierhood and of the 
Danish Society. 

^\v. (irumstrup was united in marriage on Septeml)er 1. i8g2, to ?\Iinnie 
Hansen, a nati\"e <^f (lermany, daughter of Ferchnand and ATarie Hansen. 
To their union have l)een 1)orn three very attrnctixe young ])eo])le. Effie, a 
eraduate of the Ch'nton lii^h school; T.ois. a student in the same, and Burnie. 

Mr. rirumstrup thoroughh' understands the husincss in which he is en- 
gaged, ha\-ing learned it from the ground up. He is a good manager, and in 
everv wnv a man well ecpiipped in his chosen line. Likewise he is one \^ ho-^e 
worth has gained for him deserved popularitw ■ 



PETER T. ^HLLER. 



Herein are recorded the fortunes of one whose life shows that America 
is still full of opportunities of great wcM'th to a foreigner of enterprise and 
industry, who comes to this country equipped with intelligence, strength and 
energy, }-et who could not rise \ery high by the possession of these alone 
in his own country, where opportunity is restricted Here he finds freedom 
from restriction and full opportunity for advancement, while the careful hab- 
its learned in the hardships of the old country only make his chances better 
here and aid him in the race o\-er the native of the country who has not learned 
such careful habits. 

Peter J. Miller was born in Germany. Xo\-ember iS, T86ri, the son of 
Peter J. and Charlotte (Alatthiesen) Aliller. He and his parents were born in 
territorv which belonged to Denmark at the time of his ])arents' birth, but 
which afterwards became German territory. His father was a cabinetmaker 
and in 1883 he and his oldest son came to this country and located in Chicago, 
and then came to Clinton, Iowa, when thev sent for young Peter, and a year 
later for his mother. Peter. Sr.. worked for C. Lamb & Sons for some time 
and died in 1899. His wife is living, as also are their two sons and one 
daughter. 

Peter T. INIiller, ]r , received his education mostly in (iermany. and was 
seventeen when he came to Clinton, after which time he spent one year in the 
Clinton schools. He began to learn the blacksmith's trade in Germany when 
fifteen, and first worked in this countrv for the Northwestern railroad, then 



8lO CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

two years as a steamboat hand for C. Lamb & Sons, then went to work as a 
blacksmith for the same company. In 1904 he bought out Condon's old shop, 
on the north side of the public square, and in the fall of 1909 erected a modern 
shop, where he now does blacksmithing, general repairing and wagon build- 
ing. His business, which is large and employs seyeral men, is prospering and 
increasing. In politics he is a Republican, and fraternally a member of the 
Odd Fellows and of the Danish Society. 

^Ir. ]\Iiller was married in March, 1889, to Sine Petersen, who came from 
Denmark to this country when two years old, a daughter of Xels Petersen. 
They haye one son. Alfred, aged eight years. 

Mr. Miller has won his success by industry and ability, and is much 
respected and well liked, especially among the Danish element. 



THOMAS S. HINTON. 

Among the thriying and prosperous manufacturing establishments of 
Clinton, prominent mention should be giyen to the box and ladder factory in 
which the subject of this sketch is a partner, an enterprise which has long been 
in operation, and which may be considered as one of the manufacturing busi- 
nesses of the city which rests on a strong and firm foundation and has a trade 
well established. The managers of this company are thorough and up-to- 
date business men. unceasing in their attention to their factory, whereby they 
haye been prosperous. 

Thomas S. Hinton was born in New Brunswick. Canada, January 2, 
1858, son of Richard and Sarah (Carter) Hinton, both natiyes of Canada. 
Richard Hinton was a farmer by occupation and is still Hying in Canada. Of 
his fiye sons and three daughters, none are dead. 

Thomas S. Hinton grew up on the farm and attended the Canadian com- 
mon schools. He took up railroading, bridge-building and carpentering, and 
followed this work for some years, for some time being a contractor. In 
1880 he crossed the line into the United States, still engaging in the contract- 
ing and building business. In 1882 he came to Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and in 
1892 to Clinton, where he contracted to build a box factory for the F. A. 
Smith & Sons Company. He worked for them until 1903. \yhen he bought 
out the senior \lr. Smith and went into partnershi]) with J. C. Smith, his son, 
and they haye since managed the business. 

Since the organization of the new firm the power plant and planer room 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 8l I 

lia\'e been improved, and the}- ha\'e added many novelties to their product 
and ha\e engaged largely in the manufacture of ladders. Thev employ 
about seventy-five men throughout the year, and ship their goods mainlv to 
Iowa locations. l)ut send ladders all over the middle West. The entire work 
of the factory, especially the sales department, is well organized. 

]\Ir. Hinton was married in 1S93 to Annie Y. Smith, sister of J. C. Smith. 
Two children have been born to them, Francis Smith, who is workinsr in his 
father's factory, and Hessie. 

y\v. Hinton is a Republican in politics. He has by his efforts and by his 
good management been responsible for a good deal of the increase in the fac- 
tory's business and is conversant with every stage of the operations of the 
factorv. 



ROLLIN HERBERT SAVAGE. 

Among the business men of Clinton county who have forged their way 
to the front l)v sheer force of will and individual merit rather than by the in- 
fluence and material assistance of others, no better or worthier example than 
that of the subject of this brief life record could be found. He is a man of 
excellent judgment, which accounts for his uniform success, possessing clear 
ideas in all business matters. 

Rollin Herbert Savage, the able superintendent of the Fish Brothers 
wagon factory, at Clinton, Iowa, was born at Morrison, Illinois, November 
21, 1863, and is the son of William J. and Lucy P. (Sholes) Savage. These 
parents were born in Vermont and in ajjout 1855 they came to Illinois as 
pioneers, the mother with her parents in a very early day, the maternal grand- 
father, Orin Sholes, Ijeing a pioneer in the Sucker state. The parents mar- 
ried in Illinois and there the father devoted his life to fanning, and later was 
a dealer in hardware and implements, which he followed until his death in 
1872. His widow is still living. The elder Savage was a good business man, 
and he led a quiet life, giving his entire time to his family and business affairs. 

Rollin H. Savage was educated in the Morrison public schools and when 
fourteen years of age he began learning- the machinist's trade, attending night 
school in the meantime. He had mastered the trade at the age of eighteen 
and was made foreman at the Deere &-Mansur Company at Moline, remaining 
with the same for eighteen years, gi\'ing them the very highest grade of 
service, being successively foreman, assistant superintendent and superin- 
tendent. In 1898 he left this concern and went to Davenport and took charge 



8l2 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

of the wagon department of the Bettendor-f Axle Company, remaining in their 
employ nntil thev went out of the wagon bnsiness. ^^Ir. Savage then went 
to Neosho, jMissonri. where he bnilt. equipped and started to operate a wagon 
factory. In November, 1906, he came to Clinton, Iowa, as assistant superin- 
tendent of the Fish Brothers wagon factory, and became superintendent of 
this concern in January, 1910, a position which he still holds. He is an ex- 
pert in his chosen line of endeavor and is by nature and training well equipped 
to manage the affairs of a large manufacturing concern, knowing well every 
detail of the l)usiness and being popular with employes so as to get the best 
results at all times. \Mierever he has been employed the prestige of the fac- 
tory has been greatly augmented owing to the skill, sound judgment and 
judicious counsel he has employed in the management of the same. 

In politics Mr. Savage is a Republican, and he belongs to Emulation 
Lodge No. 255, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and the De ]\Iolay Con- 
sistory ; he is also a memljer of the Modern Woodmen of America. 

Mr. Savage was married on June 11, 1890, to Julia Elizabeth Shields, 
a native of Moline, and this union has resulted in the birth of two sons. 
namely: Harry A., now eighteen years old, is a senior in the Clinton high 
school; \\^illiam H., now fourteen years of age, is a student in the local public 
schools. Mr. Savage and his whole family are members of the Presbyterian 
church. 



LEE CLAIR KELLY. 



Prominent among the prosperous and successful farmers and noteworthy 
citizens of Clinton county may be mentioned the gentleman whose name 
heads this sketch. He is a descendant of one of the best known and most 
esteemed families of the county, and is himself the owner of many acres of 
farming land, which he keeps in a high state of cultivation and which richly 
repay him for the labor and money expended on them. He is also largely 
concerned in the breeding and feeding of stock, which he has found profitable. 

Lee Clair Kelly \vas born April 12, 1886. on the farm which lie now 
owns, and is the son of Robert and Katherine (Billheimer) Kelly. Both his 
parents were natives of Pennsylvania and came to Iowa in 185 1, locating first 
W'ith Mr. Kelly's parents at Elvira. Later Robert Kelly came to Lincoln 
township and 1)ought a farm of four hundred and ninety-two acres, on which 
he erected all the buildings save the old stone house now standing. He made 
the feeding of cattle bis specialty, brought to bear on this subject brains and 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 813 

business-like methods, and made it pa)- him welL His entire time was given 
to his family and his farm. He died on January 23. 1906. at the close of a 
respected life. His \\ife also has departed this life. Of their nine children, 
five are living. 

Lee Clair Kelly received his education in the Clinton ])ul)lic schools, 
and in the Clinton Business College, in which he took a complete course. He 
then returned to the homestead and remained with his father until the latter's 
death, after which the farm was divided, and Bruce Kellv took the west one- 
fourth, while Lee bought out the heirs to the remaining two hundred and 
fifty acres. This portion of the farm still hears the n.ame of Meadow Brook 
farm, formerly applied to the whole h\ his father. He is carrving on stock 
feeding mainl}-, following in his father's footsteps, ha\-ing thoroughlv learned 
that branch of farming under the latter's able tutelage. Air. Kellv is a Re- 
publican in i)olitics. while in religion he is a member of the Clinton Presby- 
terian church. 

On May 31, 1906. Lee C. Kelly was married to Tirzah Foster, who was 
born in Pennsyh'ania. but was then a resident of Clinton count\^ One child, 
a sweet little daughter. Dorothy Elizal^eth, has l^een born to their union. Mr. 
Kelly is a young man of sterling character and much abilitv. which he has 
already proved, and with his excellent prospects, promises to live a life of 
much worth both to himself and to his communitv. 



JOHX CUXXIXGHAAf. 

One of the highly honored and successful farmers of Hampshire town- 
ship, Clinton county, is John Cunningham, who has come to us from the 
beautiful and far-famed Emerald Lsle, and, judging from his well-kept, well 
improved and altogether desirable farming property and also from the ex- 
cellent reputation he has always borne here, it is safe to say that he brought 
with him the characteristic energy, common-sense and high moral nature of 
that people. 

Mr. Cunningham was Ijorn in Ireland in 1832 and spent his youth there, 
coming to America in 1852 and locating in Clinton county, Iowa. He has 
spent most of his life engaged in farming and when he first came here he 
rented land for some time until he could get a start, continuing that method, 
in fact, until 1874, when he bought a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in 
Hampshire township, this county. He improved the place and erected ex- 
cellent and comfortable buildings of all kinds, and has been very successful 



8 14 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

here as a general farmer. He is now living retired. He has been township 
trustee for tliree years and has very faithfully performed the duties of the 
same. 

Mr. Cunningham was married to Margaret ^McLaughlin, who was born 
in the state of \\'isconsin. She was called to her rest on Jnlv 22, igoi. 
Eleven children were born to ^Ir. and Mrs. John Cunningham, ten of whom 
are living, namely: Frank is located at Albany, Illinois; IMarv is the wife of 
John Manning, of ]\It. Carroll; Rose is the wife of Oliver Prest, of San 
Bernardino, California; Thomas is a homesteader in Scenic, Dakota; Susan is 
in the employ of the "Lend-a-Hand Club," of Davenport, Iowa; Alaggie and 
Annie are living in ^Minneapolis, Minnesota; James is also a homesteader in 
Butte, Dakota ; Martin and Peter live on the home place, the former having 
been born here on Feliruary 22, 1887, and he was educated in the home 
schools, and is a \ery successful and well liked young farmer; Alice is de- 
ceased. These children have been well educated, having attended the semi- 
nary at Lyons and then the Clinton Business College. 

This family is highly respected wherever its members are known and 
they have a wide circle of friends ?nd are very well situated in reference to 
tin's world's affairs. Mr. Cunningham and his family are all members of 
the Catholic church. Politicallv, he is a Democrat. 



WILLIAM HEXDERSOX POSTOX. 

It is a pleasure to the biographer to record the life nf a man whose actions 
have been so full of interest as those of the gentleman whose name heads this 
article, whose history is full of experiences which have brought a fullness of 
life to him. and whose ancestors were men and women of worth and honor. 

William Henderson Poston was born in Rock Island county, Illinois, Aug- 
ust 27, 1858, son of Samuel and Sarah (Wolf) Poston. His father was a 
native of Virginia, and his paternal grandfather, Elias Poston, was a com- 
missioned officer in the war of 181 2, and also state representative from his 
district in Virginia. He was of Scotch descent, and the family is one of the 
oldest in the state. William's maternal grandparents were Pennsvlvanians, 
pioneer settlers of Allegheny county, that state, which they entered before it 
was cleared and had many exciting experiences with the Indians. Thev died 
in Rock Island county, Illinois. 

Samuel Poston was l:!orn and grew up in the mountain gap where Mc- 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 815 

Clellan fought his first battle. His father was a slave owner in early days, 
but in 1838 freed them all because he thought it wrong to keep them, and a 
few years later, in the early forties, moved to the free state of Iowa, coming 
west on an Ohio steamboat and ascending the ^Mississippi in a similar manner. 
He located in Scott county, near Le Clair, then called Parkhurst. Here he 
was married to Sarah \\'olf, who had come west with her parents, and for 
many vears he was a wagonmaker. William Cody, later famous as "Buffalo 
Bill," was a friend of the family and as a boy spent many a day in ]\Ir. 
Poston's shop. In 1857 the family moved to Rock Island county, Illinois, 
and there the father followed the same trade. Four of his brothers served in 
the Ci\il war. and one of them, .\lfred, died four days after his return from 
serving in the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth Illinois Regiment. Samuel 
Poston died in 1885 '^'^'^^^ 1'''^ wife in 1880. They were the parents of eight 
children, six of whom are living. 

A\'illiam Poston was educated in the public schools of Rock Island county, 
Illinois, and when he was still under fourteen his father told him that he was 
old enough to get to work, so he began to labor on the farms, and worked four 
years for one man. He then served an apprenticeship in a wagon shop, 
worked two }ears as a journeyman, and then opened a wagonmaking shop in 
Fort Byron, Illinois. On April lo, 1890, he came to Clinton, Iowa, and 
started into business at Xos. 1101-3-5 South Fourth street. He was absolutely 
alone, but gradually added to his force as business increased, and in 1907, 
because of pressure of business, had to add another building to the old one 
which he had bought. He now employs from ten to twelve men, but on April 
I, 1910, quit wagonmaking to enter that of automobile repairing, which busi- 
ness he recently disposed of. 

In national politics Mr. Poston is a Democrat, but in local affairs is inde- 
pendent. He was for two years a member of the city council and was also for 
two years on the school board, being for one year president. He was one 
time the Democratic candidate for mayor. He is a member of the De ^Nlolav 
Consistory of Masons. 

Mr. Poston was married on Xovember 20, 1882, to Emma ^Nlilne, a 
native of Oswego county, Xew York, daughter of James Milne, now residing 
in Fulton, Illinois. Four children have been born to them; Frank, a cigar 
merchant; Elsie, wife of William Graham; Mae, deceased, and Alaude. 

Mr. Poston was thoroughly skilled in the Avagonmaker's trade and the 
products of his shop were models of efliciency. He is much interested in 
public affairs and in all which promises to advance the general interest. He 
has many friends in Clinton. 



8l6 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

CHRISTOPH JOHN GOHLMAN. 

Prominent among the enterprising farmers and stock raisers of Clinton 
count}' is Christoph John Gohhnan, a leading citizen of Berlin township, 
whom to know is to esteem and honor. As the name indicates, he is of Ger- 
man stock, his parents, John G. and Katrina (jMoll'erstedt) Gohlman, noticed 
elsewhere in this \'olume, having been born and reared in the fatherland, 
where the ancestors of the family have lived for many generations. Mr. 
Gohlman is a native of Clinton county, Iowa, and dates his birth from March 
31, 1857. His educational discipline included the common school branches, 
which he mastered in his youth, and in the school of experience on the family 
homestead he learned the lessons of practical industry and self-denial which 
furnished the foundation for his subsequent career as a progressive farmer 
and public-spirited man of affairs. Reared in close touch with nature, he 
took kindl}' to agricultural pursuits and on reaching an age when it became 
necessary for him to choose a vocation, he very naturally selected farming, 
to which noble calling he has since devoted his time and energies with most 
gratifying results. 

In the year 1889, Air. Gohlman bought the fine two-hundred-acre farm 
in Berlin township on which he still lives, and which the meanwhile he has 
brought to a high state of culti\ation, l^esides adding a number of improve- 
ments until his home is now one of the most beautiful and attractive places 
of residence in the community. The buildings are substantial, up to date 
and in excellent condition. The land, cultivated to its full capacity, yields 
abundantly all the crops indigeiious to this latitude, and the proprietor has 
so managed his \-aried interests of farming and stock raising as to accumu- 
late a handsome competence and place himself and family in comfortable cir- 
cumstances. Mr. Gohlman is a pronounced Democrat in his political views 
and from time to time has been honored by his fellow-citizens with important 
official positions. He served several years as collector and school director, 
held the office of trustee for some time and in various other capacities dem- 
onstrated ability and faithfulness as a pubdic servant and j^iroved himself 
worthy the trust reposed in him ]:)y his fellowmen. 

Mr. Gohlman was married in the year 1882 to Katrina Raun, a native 
of Germany, who has presented him with six children, namely : Bertha, 
Theodore. Anna, Alma, Laura and John, all living and affording their fond 
parents many bright hopes for the future. Mr. and Mrs. Gohlman are mem- 
bers of the Evangelical Lutheran church, active and zealous in the good work 
under the auspices of the local congregation to which they l^elong, and readv 




MR. AND MRS. CHRISTOPH J. (,OHLMAN 



PI l.l>iU Liu..Aii.Y 



A8"'0 \ V-rOX, AND 
i1IlDt?N FOUNDATIONS 
R L 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 817 

at all times to lend their influence to further worthy charitable and humani- 
tarian enterprises. He is identified with the Modern Woodmen of America, 
and she to the Royal Neighbors, in which organizations they are recognized 
as valuable workers, besides holding important offices from time to time. 
Mr. Gohhnan is one of the most respected citizens of Berlin township, and, 
assisted by his faithful wife, he has reared a family which is a credit to the 
community. A self made man, guided by keen perception and well-developed 
intelligence, he has earned a competence which in the near future will result 
in ease and comfort for the remainder of a peaceful and happy hfe. 

Mention should be made of the parents of Mrs. Gohlman. She was the 
daughter of Christian and Anna (Holtz) Raun, who farmed on a small 
scale in Germany. They had a family of seven girls and one son, namely : 
Christina, Maria, Alaren, Lena, Katrina. Peter, Anna and Dorethia. Three 
sisters came to this countrv and the rest are still in Ciermanv. 



AXSEL O. COLE. 



Occupying a conspicuous position among the men of industry in Clinton 
county, Ansel O. Cole is eminently deserving of mention in a work of the 
province of the one at hand, and he enjoys the confidence and esteem of all 
who know him. His record demonstrates that where there is a will there is 
a way and that obstacles to success may be overcome by courage and self- 
reliance. 

Mr. Cole was born in Bristol county, Massachusetts, April 12, 1853, and 
he is the son of George C. and Mary A. (Rounds) Cole, the latter born in 
18 1 7. They were both natives of Massachusetts and there the father en- 
gaged in farming and also taught school there for many years. He was a 
well educated man and popular in his community, taking much interest in the 
affairs of his town, but he was not a public man and preferred the Cjuiet of 
home life. His death occurred in 1869 and the death of Mrs. Cole occurred 
in 1878. They were the parents of five children, four sons and one daughter, 
the latter being deceased. 

Ansel O. Cole, of this review, was educated in the common schools of 
Bristol county, Massachusetts, and he was reared on the home farm where 
he became acquainted with the general work on the place when but a boy. 
He served four years as an apprentice to the mason's trade, and followed the 
same for a period of ten years. Giving up this line of endeavor, he entered 
(52) 



8l8 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

a jewelry manufactory, in which he worked for a period of five years, being 
very successful in the same. Then his wife died and he came to Lyons, 
Iowa, in 1885 and became connected with the M. A. Disbrow Company, in 
which he worked up to the position of superintendent in due course of time 
and this he still holds, giving the firm the utmost satisfaction, always ful- 
filling his duties in a very faithful manner. This establishment employs about 
one hundred and fifty men and is doing a large and ever-increasing business, 
due in no small degree to the wise counsel and able management of Mr. Cole, 
who not only understands every detail of the work, but who knows how to 
handle men so as to get the best service and retain their good will at the 
same time. The products of this farm are sash, doors, blinds and interior 
furnishing goods of all kinds; A large trade is carried on. the major part of 
the shipments being to the western states. Owing to the high quality of these 
products, they are in great demand. Mr. Cole is president of the Disbrow 
Sash and Door Company of Cedar Rapids. Iowa, which is also doing a big 
business. 

In politics Mr. Cole is a Republican, but is independent in local affairs. 
He has served about four years on the school board. He is a member of the 
Episcopal church, being junior warden in the local congregation. He is liberal 
in his support of the church and all worthy charitable institutions. 

My. Cole was married in 1875 to jMartha L. Copeland, sister of the secre- 
tary and treasurer of the Disbrow Company. To Mr. and Mrs. Cole one 
child was born, Maynard C, now living in Omaha, Nebraska. ]Mr. Cole's 
first wife passed to her rest in 1884 and he was married in 1889 to Gertrude 
^I. A\'aters, a native of Moline, Illinois. This union also resulted in the 
birth of one child, who died in infancv. 



F. B. KIXG. 



One of the enterprising meii of Clinton county is F. B. King, a gentle- 
man who is too well known, in fact, to need any formal introduction or elab- 
oration on his life history here, for he has long been a conspicuous figure in 
the manufacturing business and social life of eastern Iowa and therefore the 
major part of this sketch will be devoted to the large concern with which he 
is identified. Suflice it to say that he has worthily upheld the honor of his 
family name and the wholesome traditions clustering about it, and that he has 
ever taken an abiding interest in the upbuilding of Clinton and vicinitv. and 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 819 

is deserving in every way of the large success that has attended his efforts 
and of the esteem in which he is held. 

Mr. King was born in Savanna, Illinois, in 1867, and he is the son of C. 
H. King, an old river man and steamboat captain who was well known on 
the rivers of the Middle states in the early days. 

F. B. King received a liberal education and spent his youth in his home 
community. In 1880 he came to Clinton, Iowa, and entered the City Bank, 
in which he remained eleven years, giving entire satisfaction to all concerned. 
He then became associated with the Clinton Separator and Engine Works, 
and has been connected with the same ever since, in fact, no little credit is due 
him for the constantly growing prestige and business of this firm, having 
given it his judicious management and undivided attention and ably looked 
after its interests at all times. 

This manufacturing concern was incorporated on January i, 1901. and 
efforts were at once begun to build a patented cream separator, with a small 
gasoline engine to run it. The officers were : J. D. Lamb, president ; G. E. 
Lamb, vice-president; S. \A'. McKee, second vice-president; W. O. Pratt, 
secretary. They continued in this line of work to January, 1903, then 
started to build boats and marine engines, having sold out the separator busi- 
ness. A reorganization was effected and the plant was enlarged somewhat 
and on October 9, 1903, the name was changed to the Lamb Boat & Engine 
Company, with J. D. Lamb as president ; G. E. Lamb, vice-president ; F. B. 
King, secretary and treasurer. J. D. Lamb (a full sketch of whom appears 
elsewhere in this work) was drowned on ]\Iay 12. 1905. and since that time 
G. E. Lamb has been president of this firm ; V. A. Bonny, vice-president ; F. 
B. King, secretary and treasurer. 

In 1903 this firm employed from fifteen to twenty men; now on an aver- 
age of seventy-five men are employed and the business is still growing. They 
have discontinued building boats and the firm now gives its attention ex- 
clusivelv to building large marine engines, which, owing to their superior 
quality and workmanship, are eagerly sought after and they find a- very ready 
market, the demand increasing all the time. The firm now has a branch office 
in >s'ew York City where about fifty per cent, of the product of this factory- 
is shipped. These engines go over the entire world where such advanced 
products are used. This product is regarded as a standard engine on both 
the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. It has been developed from a small two-cycle 
engine to a larger and more complex type. They are now installed in some of 
the finest boats to be found on the eastern coast, also the western. A separate 
corporation, known as the Lamb Engine Company, with offices in the Hudson 



820 CLINTON COUNTYj IOWA, 

Terminal Building, handles the business in New York City. These engines 
are especially sought for by builders of large yachts. This was originally a 
purely local concern, but now the business is done very largely away from 
Clinton, though there is yet considerable business done here. It seems that 
the motor boat business is growing rapidly all over the country, following 
closely the automobile industry, and the local company owes its growth to 
this development in the universal and rapidly growing use of motor boats. 



WILLIAM L. DIECKMANN. 

The record of the subject of this review is that of a gentleman who 
worthily upholds an honored family name that has long stood for high grade 
citizenship in Clinton county. He has figured prominently in industrial 
affairs, although yet a young man, and at the same time has won an envied 
reputation for honesty and straightforward dealing with all his fellow men 
and he has therefore won their undivided confidence. 

William L. Dieckmann, secretary and treasurer of the Hansen & Dieck- 
mann Furniture Company, of Clinton, Iowa, and a member of the real estate 
and insurance firm of Paddock & Dieckmann. was born at Wheatland, this 
county, June 29, I'S/Q, and he is the son of Frederick and Fredericke (Layere) 
Dieckmann. They were born in Germany, and the father came to America 
when a boy, the mother making the trip about 1858. They were married in 
Kentucky. The father studied for the ministry and subsequently entered the 
same, but abandoned the life of a preacher to study medicine, which he prac- 
ticed with much success later in life. He was a profoundly educated man and 
was influential wherever he went. He came to Wheatland, Iowa, about 1876 
or 1877 and he at once became prominent in Clinton county. He was always 
active in political afifairs and his support could be depended upon in all meas- 
ures calculated to be of general good to the community. 

William L. Dieckmann was educated in the public schools of Clinton, 
receiving a very serviceable text-book training. After graduation from Clin- 
ton high school, he started in life for himself by entering the real estate and 
insurance business with his oldest brother, Fred Dieckmann, and A. H. Pad- 
dock, under the firm name of Paddock & Dieckmann, which partnership lasted 
until the death of the subject's brother, Fred, since which time the finn of 
Paddock & Dieckmann has been composed of A. H. Paddock and W. L. Dieck- 
mann. This firm has built up a very satisfactory business in this line and 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 821 

ranks as one of the strongest in the state. They ha\e the agency for twenty- 
five of the oldest and strongest insurance companies in the business. Though 
able to underwrite all kinds of insurance, they confine their efforts mainly to 
fire and tornado, casualty and burglaiy insurance, and issuance of surety 
bonds. Paddock & Dieckmann negotiate real estate loans and have been very 
successful in this line. They are justly proud of the fact that no loan ever 
recommended by them has recjuired legal action to enforce payment of princi- 
pal or interest. 

Mr. Dieckmann next turned his attention to the furniture manufacturing 
industry and by close application to this line of work and judicious manage- 
ment he has built up a large and rapidly growing business under the corporate 
name of Hansen & Dieckmann Furniture Company at Clinton. They have a 
model plant, equipped with the latest designs of wood working machinery, and 
manufacture extension, library and center tables. The goods of this firm 
are highly esteemed ])y the furniture dealers of the Middle West. 

Mr. Dieckmann has never ])een a candidate for political preferment and 
frnternallv lie belongs to the various Masonic bodies, and is a member of the 
Wapsipinicon Clul}. 



CHARLES W. KENNEY. 

It is a rare privilege to be able to spend our lives on the old home place ; 
there is a charm under "the roof that hears our earliest cry," that never 
vanishes, but for some caprice of fate few of us are permitted to remain at 
our birthplace ; we are ushered out into strange lands among strange people 
and are compelled to form new ties and often adopt different modes of exist- 
ence. This has not been the case with Charles W". Kenny, of Clinton county, 
who was born on December 24, 1868, on the farm which he now occupies. 
He is the son of Patrick and ^Margaret (Blessington ) Kenney, both born in 
Ireland, from which country they came to America in 1847 ^"'^^ 1840, respect- 
ively. The father came alone and after a few years spent in New York, 
Michigan and Wisconsin, he came to Clinton count}', Iowa, in 185 1 or 1852 
and entered government land, being among the pioneers. He developed his 
one hundred and sixty acres in Hampshire township into an excellent farm, 
by clearing and improving it, and he was married in this county, having been 
a young man and single when he came here. The maternal grandparents, 
the Blessington family, came to America about 1840 and located in Vermont. 
They left their daughter Margaret in the city of Lowell, Massachusetts, where 



822 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA, 

she found employment in the cotton mills ; later she came to Clinton county, 
Iowa, and married Patrick Kenney. To this union eight children were born, 
seven of whom are living. Patrick Kenney has never been a public man, 
living a quiet life, yet interested in local affairs. He has lived retired in 
Lyons since 1893. His wife died in 1905. 

Charles \\\ Kenny was educated in the common schools and reared on 
the home farm where he assisted with the work of clearing and developing 
and he has never cared to follow any other line of work. About 1900 he 
bought the old home place of one hundred and sixty acres. He has managed 
the same very successfully and has made a great success in stock raising, 
breeding high grade Aberdeen Angus cattle, draft horses and other good 
stock, which always find a ready market owing to their superior cjuality. 

Politically, Mr. Kenney is a Democrat. He has been township assessor 
for six years and is now township trustee, and is also secretary of the school 
board at present. He Ijelongs to St. Iraneaus Catholic church at Lvons. and 
to the Woodmen of the World. 

On April 10, 1893, Mr. Kenney married Rosa V. Shannon, daughter of 
Patrick and Julia Shannon, old settlers of Washington township. This 
union resulted in the l)irth of eight children, namely: Charles J., Francis P., 
Beatrice M., Andrew. Joseph (died in infancy), Rose Lillian, Monica and 
James G. The mother of these children was called to her rest on May 18, 
1910. She was a woman of beautiful Christian character and had a host of 
friends. 



FRANK J. McDERMOTT. 

Though a young man, Frank J. ]\Icl^ermott has shown what earnestness 
of purpose can accomplish in connection with agricultural interests, and if he 
continues to use the good judgment and energy that have characterized his 
past he will be abundantly rewarded l)v future years. 

Mr. McDermott was born in Lincoln township. Clinton county, Iowa, 
on February 18, 1881. He is the son of Flenry and Mary (Welsh) McDer- 
mott, he born in Ireland and the mother in St. Louis, Missouri. The father 
emigrated to America in aljout 1850 and located in Hampshire township, 
Clinton county, Iowa, where he took up a farm of about one hundred and 
sixty acres, which he improved and on which he placed an excellent group of 
buildings. He cleared the land, beginning life here in true pioneer fashion. 
Selling out there, he mo^'ed to Lincoln township, where he bought a farm of 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 823 

three hundred and twenty acres and there he became one of the leading agri- 
cuhurists and was a man of influence. Hving there until his death, in 1904. at 
the advanced age of eighty-eight years. He was not a public man. preferring 
to live a quiet and retired life. His widow is still living. They were the par- 
ents of four children, and by a former marriage Air. AIcDermott was the 
father of four children; all are living. 

Frank J. AIcDermott, of this re^•iew. was educated in the common 
schools and he was reared on the home farm where he began working in the 
fields when but a lad and he has made agriculture his chief life work and now 
operates half of the home place, his brother, Paul, operating the other half. 
He has been \ery successful and is a general farmer and stock faiser and is 
succeeding admirably well. In politics he is a Democrat, and he belongs to 
the Catholic church at Lyons. 

On September 8. 1907, Air. AIcDermott was married to Anna W^ebber, 
a native of Clinton, Iowa, where she was reared and educated and where her 
family is highly respected. To this union one child has been born. Alarian. 
Fraternally, Air. AIcDermott is a member of the Alodern ^'\^oodmen of 
America, while, politically, he is a Democrat. 



HIRAAI E. JAAIEYSON. 

Among the business men of Clinton county who are reaping the rewards 
of persistent endeavor along legitimate lines and who are worthy of the con- 
fidence reposed in them by their associates and patrons is H. E. Jameyson. 
The record of his business career might be summed up in the terse expression 
that he is "above want and below envy." 

Air. Jameyson was born in Lyons, Clinton county, Iowa. January 2, 
1862, and he is the son of Elias and Amanda Jameyson. who were born in 
Canada and Xew York respectively. The father came to the "States'" xery 
early and married in Ohio, where the parents of his wife had moved when the 
country was new. Later they emigrated west and located in Elk River town- 
ship, Clinton county, Iowa, during the fifties. Elias Jameyson devoted his 
life to farming and owned a small farm. He lived a quiet, retired life, work- 
ing his farm and devoting his attention to his family. 

To Air. and Airs. Elias Jameyson nine children were born, five of whom 
are living. The father's death occurrerl in 1907. and the mother passed away 
in 1882. 



824 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

Hiram E. Jameyson was educated in the common schools of Clinton and 
reared on a farm, where he was put to \vork in the fields early in life. When 
twenty-one years old he began life for himself by entering the sawmill business 
which he continued for a period of thirteen years, then entered the gravel, 
sand and cement business, and has been very successful in this line since 1894. 
For about ten years Mr. Jameyson handled ice in connection with his other 
line, but has dropped that phase of his business. He also handled fish since 
1894, having about twenty men in that trade alone. He does an ice contract- 
ing business for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad Company, hav- 
ing supplied the local demand of the company for years. 

Politically. Mr. Jameyson is a Republican, and fraternally he belongs to 
the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Lodge No. 93, at Clinton. 

Mr. Jameyson was married in 1883 to Laura Thompson, and this union 
has resulted in the birth of five children, namely : Vernon, now a resident of 
Washington state; Edna, the wife of William Harlot, Jr.; Coral, the wife of 
Samuel Stul^ble, Jr. ; Elva and Cecil. 

Mr. Jameyson has a very pleasant and attractive home on South Fifth 
street, Lyons. He is known to be a man of integrity and his standing in 
business and social circles could not be better. 



RICHARD HUGHES. 



To be an efficient and honorable agriculturist in the highly favored sec- 
tion of eastern Iowa, where the soil responds generously to the hand which 
cultivates it, is to be assured of a comfortable home and favorable surround- 
ings. Among the successful farmers of Clinton county is Richard Hug"hes, of 
Berlin township, who was l^orn on the farm \vhere' he now lives, April 9, 
1857. His father was Richard Hughes, and liis mother, prior to her mar- 
riasfe, bore the name of Esther O'Brien, both natives of Ireland. These 
parents came to the United States in the late forties, and after spending a 
)''ear or two in La Salle county, Illinois, moved to Clinton county. Iowa, 
and settled on sixty acres of land in Berlin township, which INIr. Hughes 
purcliased of the go\-ernment. He bought other land at inter\-als, until in 
due time he became one of the largest owners of real estate in the county, 
his holdings at one time amounting to over six hundred acres, all in the 
township of Berlin. He was one of the leading farmers in his part of the 
country, manifested an active interest in public affairs, and enjoyed the 



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RICHARD HUGHES 



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CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 825 

esteem and confidence of the people of his community, besides holding- worthy 
prestige as a public-spirited citizen. He lived an honorable life, which 
terminated on September 20, 1901, his wife dying on the 4th day of October, 
1907. Richard and Esther Hughes reared a family of ten children, namely: 
Michael, of Lyon county. Iowa; Richard, of this review; Anna, who lives 
in Pl'vmouth county, this state ; Katie, of Berlin township ; Patrick, whose 
home is in the county of Plymouth; Thomas, who resides in Berlin township, 
near the family homestead; William, who lives on the old homestead; Janies, 
a resident of Lost Nation, this county; Mary and Ellen, deceased. 

Richard Hughes was reared on the home place in Berlin township and 
enjoyed such educational advantages as the common schools afforded. He 
earlv decided to be a tiller of the soil, and in 1901 bought eighty acres of 
land belonging to the homestead, to which he has added other places from 
time to time until he now owns two hundred acres of the farm, on which 
he has made a number of \-aluable improvements. He devotes his attention 
to general agriculture and the breeding of fine live stock, his specialties being 
Norman horses. Shorthorn cattle and Poland-China hogs, in the raising of 
which he has been remarkal)ly successful, his reputation as a stockman being 
second to that of no other man in this part of the state. Financially, he has 
been exceedingly fortunate. ])eing among the wealthy and influential farmers 
of his township, with a sufficiency of this world's goods at his command 
to insure an easy and prosperous future. Like all men with the interests of 
the communitv at heart, he takes an acti\-e part in puljlic aft'airs. and has 
well-grounded convictions concerning the f|uestions of the day. l)eing' an 
uncompromising Democrat in politics and a leader of his i)arty in the t(Twn- 
ship of Berlin. Wdiile zealous in the defense of his principles, he has ne\'er 
sought or desired office, not^^•ithstanding whicli he has ser\'ed his fellow- 
citizens in various public capacities and pro\"ed true to e\'er\- trust wliich 
they reposed in him. Religiously, he was reared under the influence of the 
Roman Catholic church and has e\-er remained true to the teachings of the 
same, belonging at this time to the congregation worsliipping at Hughes 
Settlement, of which his wife and children are meml:ers also. 

On the 23d day of January, 1883, Mr. Hughes was united in marriage 
with Margaret Sjjain. whose parents. John and Bridget (Quigley) Spain, 
nati\es of Canada, came to Iowa in 185 1. and were among the early residents 
and well-known families of Clinton count}'. The following are the names 
of the children born to 'Sir. and Mrs. Hughes: Esther, wife of Joseph Sul- 
liAan ; Catherine, Jose])h. Ellen. Ignatius. Marguerite. John and Ligora. Mr. 



826 CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 

Hughes and his estimable wife have been zealous in religious and charitable 
work and their neighbors and friends speak in high terms of their many 
sterling qualities of mind and heart. They have a pleasant home, in which 
hospitality alx)unds, and all who cross their threshold are greeted with a 
welcome, which delays as long as possible their departure. Possessing a 
pleasing personalit}-, with a manner which inspires confidence, Mr. Hughes 
is one of the most popular citizens of his community, a fact made apparent 
by his faculty of winning and retaining warm personal friendships. 



JOHN WILLIAM MILLER. 

The young man whom we are now considering has literally made his 
own w^ay from boyhood, having been left an orphan at a vevy early age and 
having during his youth worked at a great variety of trades and occupations, 
and passed through some hardships. In this way he has acquired a schooling 
in the w^ays of the world such as it is the lot of few boys to obtain, and whose 
value is almost incalculable, though it is hard to reckon even this over against 
the loss of a father's care and a mother's love, which he early sustained and 
has felt at all times since. The record of his youth is exceedingly interesting. 

John W. Miller was born in Lyons, Iowa, on May 15, 1876, the son of 
William M. and Mary (Hagemann) Miller. His parents were born in Ger- 
many and came early to America, locating at Lyons, where his father was a 
grocer and dry goods merchant, well known as such to the older residents of 
the town. When John was two years old his mother died, and when he 
was seven, his father passed away. John lived wnth his step-parents and re- 
ceived his education in the Lyons common schools, the Lyons high school, and 
Clinton Business College. While going to school as a mere boy he worked 
in the summer for Gardner, Bacheller & Wells for ten cents per day. Later 
he w^orked for Disbro & Company nine months at thirty-five cents a day. 
Then he was with the George Ashton Dry Goods Company for one year, 
worked for I. A. Nattenger. the dry goods merchant, for three years and two 
months, and then eight months for the Chicago Clothing Company, w'here he 
used to work of evenings while attending the business college. About April 
15, 1896, he went to work on the steamer "Reindeer" in the packet line, re- 
mained on her for five months, and then, going to Chicago, became a newsboy 
on the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, following this for five months. 
Then, on returning to Clinton, he obtained a position with the Welke Coal & 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 82/ 

Ice Company, and in 190 1 was made manager. This is the oldest fuel com- 
pany in Lyons. This company has also an office in CHnton under the name 
of the Clinton Coal & Ice Company, and Mr. Miller is also manager of that. 
This office was located at No. 134 Fourth avenue on Ji-ine i, 1905. In 1905 
Mr. Miller purchased the first up-to-date spring ice wagon ever seen in Clin- 
ton, and this is only an example of his general progressiveness. He is a 
director in the Clinton District Agricultural Fair Association. Fraternally, 
he is a member of the Woodmen of the World, which he joined in April, 
1910. He is a Democrat, and in 1904, at the age of twenty-seven, was elected 
alderman from the sixth ward, being one of the youngest ever elected here. 
In 1908 he was re-elected, and again in 19 10. His first election was by a 
majority of eighteen, the second by forty-six, the third by eighty-eight, show- 
ing that his efficient service is being recognized. Three days before the 1904 
election he was requested by some of his friends, old Democrats, to make the 
race for alderman. He believed himself to be too young, but was finally 
persuaded. 

Mr. ]\Iiller was married on November 28, 1899, to j\Iae Dorsey, a native 
of Lyons, daughter of Patrick and Anna Dorsey, her father one of the first 
ice men in Clinton and two terms a member of the city council. They are 
the parents of two interesting and attractive children, Lucile Katherine, aged 
seven, and William Dorsey, aged five. 

Mr. Miller owns a pleasant and comfortable home at No. 303 South 
Seventh street. He has many friends in the city, and is considered by all as 
one of the livest and most promising business men in the county. Mrs. 
Miller is a member of the Catholic church. 



AVILLIAM ALBERT WILKE. 

Here is mentioned one of the business men of Clinton who has made him- 
self well known throughout the city as one of the most reliable in all his deal- 
ings and operations and as a manager of remarkable ability. Born in Ger- 
manv. he came to this country a young man after receiving the training for 
which Germany is famous, in her unexcelled schools, which do so much to 
inculcate the spirit of industry, a German national trait ; and in her army, the 
training in which gives the understanding of discipline and the building up of 
a physique which will withstand all the hardships of life. With this training, 
and with his own native ability, it is small wonder that he has been so sue- 



828 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

cessful even though hampered at first by being in a foreign country, among 
people who spoke a foreign tongue. 

WilHam Albert Wilke was born in Demmin, Pommerania, Germany, 
September 9. 1859. son of Carl Wilke, who is mentioned elsewhere in this 
work. He received his education in the German schools and served three 
years in the army. In October. i8'85, he came to America and located in 
Clinton, where the w^hole family made their residence for some time. He 
worked one year on farms, then took up teaming and was engaged in this 
until 1 89 1 or 1892. when, with Fred C. Wilke, he started the ^^1lke Brothers 
Coal & Ice Company. After some years successful operation of this company, 
he bought out his brother and in 1897 organized the Wilke Coal & Ice Com- 
pany. This company owns and controls the Clinton Coal & Ice Company. 
Mr. W. A. \\^ilke is president of the Wilke Coal & Ice Company, which has 
been very successful and carries on extensive operations, having manv satis- 
fied customers, the best advertisement for any firm. 

?dr. Wilke w's married in i88~ to ^Irs. Kati? Miller, formerh- Aliss 
Katie Klint. No children have 1)een born to their union. Mr. Wilke is a 
Democrat in politics. In fraternal relations he is a member of the Knights 
of Pythias, and in his every day life applies the fraternal principles of his 
order. He has gained many friends for himself during his residence and 
career of business activity in Clinton, and is by all considered one of her most 
progressive men. 



CHARLES F. HOOKS. 

Like most voung men. the one of whom we are now writing has not 
passed through enough of life to make his history long, for his record must 
of necessity be more in the future than in the past. But he has shown the 
mettle that is in him and is now in a very responsible position in a manufactur- 
ing establishment. He is well known among the business men of the city 
anrl has a verv promising future. He is of Irish descent, one of that race 
wliich will not be downed, and which seems especially fitted for positions of 
command and management, showing clearly in his activities the value of that 
blood which fills his veins. 

Charles F. Hooks was born in Clinton. Iowa. October 26. 1884. the 
son of Patrick and Katherine (Killagan) Hooks. His parents were born in 
Ireland, and very early came to America, locating in Clinton, where his father 
was engaged in the lumber Inisincss for many years, having a large and pros- 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 829 

perotis business. Patrick Hooks has given the most of his hfe to his business 
and now is Hving a retired hfe in Chnton. He has many friends and is 
spending his old age in peace, quiet and honor. Of his thirteen children, 
twelve are living and doing well in the world. 

Charles Hooks attended the Clinton public schools and St. Mary's paroch- 
ial school, being graduated in the latter. For some time he worked at various 
things, but in 1905 entered the employ of the Clinton Spring Bed Company, a 
leading manufacturing establishment of the city. In 1909 this was reorgan- 
ized and he was made vice-president of the Clinton Furniture Company, a 
position which he now holds and has efficiently filled. 

In politics, Mr. Hooks is a Democrat, and he is a member of the Catholic 
church. He is a member of the Catholic Order of Foresters, of the Knights 
of Columbus, and of the Iowa Catholic Total Abstinence Society. He has a 
high reputation in Clinton for business sagacity and acumen, and has many 
friends, especially among the younger element. He is unmarried. 

The Clinton Furniture Company is a prosperous organization with a 
large and increasing output, and much of its prosperity is due to the good 
management of Mr. Hooks. 



JOHN WINGERT EVANS. 

The subject of this sketch is of English descent, fortunate to count him- 
self as of that nation which has spread its dominion farther than empire ever 
before extended, and has developed a language in use by more people than 
ever spoke the same tongue before. Englishmen, wherever found, are among 
the leaders, and our own cosmopolitan nation is built on an English foundation 
and has assimilated many of the traits which have made the mother country 
mistress of the world's greatest dominion. Although we are nominally an 
Anglo-Saxon nation, still it is unusual at this date to find a community where 
this is literally true and where a majority of the citizens are of English descent, 
even remotely. 

John Wingert Evans was born in Clarence, Iowa, February 26, 1872, son 
of Charles Albert and Ellen (Wingert) Evans, his father a native of England, 
his mother of Marvdand. Charles Albert Evans came to this country in 1844 
with his father, John Evans, and family. They located in Wisconsin first. 
Charles A. Evans, at the age of about twenty-six, came to Clarence, Iowa, 
making the iourney by horse and wagon instead of trains, and having to ferry 



830 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

across the Mississippi. He was married in Clarence and has since farmed in 
Cedar county, owning one hundred and sixty acres. He and his wife are 
now Hving in Chnton, retired. They are the parents of three children, all 
li\-ing. Charles A.. Jr.. Ada, wife of H. B. Acott, and John \\\ 

John W. Evans was educated in the Clarence high school, and remained 
on the farm until graduation. He then went to Chicago, in 1889, and clerked 
there in a retail store. In 1894 he removed to Clinton and bought out a drug 
store at No. 1020 West Fourth street, and has been here ever since. His 
business was very small to begin \vith, but has since grown to large pro- 
portions, due to his good management. In politics he is a Republican on 
national issues, but votes independently on local affairs. He is a member of 
the Western Star Lodge of Masons, of the Elks, and of the Woodmen of the 
World. 

Mr. Evans was married in 1896 to Edna L. Mitchell, a native of Clinton, 
daughter of William F. Mitchell, an old settler who came here when a boy. 
They are the parents of one very attractive little daughter. Mae Leverge. 

Mr. Evans' maternal grandparents were Peter and Isabel (Gary) Wing- 
ert, natives of Maryland, but of Pennsylvania-German descent. They came 
west to Peoria, Illinois, remained there but a short time and then came to 
York Prairie, Iowa. 

Mr. Evans is one of the most progressive druggists in the city and has a 
thoroughly up-to-date and well ecjuipped drug store. He is very successful in 
attracting trade, acting on the maxim that a satisfied customer is the best trade 
getter. Personally, he is a man of splendid character and high standing in 
the community. 



MILO J. JOHN. 



The enterprising business man whose name heads this article is clearly 
entitled to specific mention in this work. Carefully brought up in his home, 
and well instructed in the principles of living by his patriotic father, he has 
been since faithful to his teachings, and has lived a life in accordance, which 
has brought him business success and has won for him the esteem of the peo- 
ple of his city. 

Milo J. John was born in Springfield, Ohio, July 28, 1856, the son of 
Howard D. and Eliza (Powell) John. His paternal grandparents were 
Peter and (Stough) John, the John family being an old Virginia fam- 
ily of Welsh descent. They, after the birth of their son Peter, moved from 
Virginia to Pennsylvania, and there died. The maternal grandparents were 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 83 1 

Benjamin, a native of Kentiick)-, and Elvira (Winans) Powell, who very early 
located in Ohio, where their family were born and where they died. 

Howard D. John was married in Ohio, and was a carpenter in Spring- 
field. ^^'hen the war broke out he enlisted in i\pril, 1861, in Company I, Sec- 
ond Ohio Volunteers, and was first lieutenant at the battle of Bull Run. 
Later he organized a company which joined the Eighty-sixth Ohio as Com- 
pany I, with him as captain. After his second term of enlistment expired, he 
enlisted again, and was elected colonel of the One Hundred and Twenty-ninth 
Ohio, and served in that capacity for some time. His wife died in 1863. 
After the war Colonel John took up the carpenter's trade, and followed it 
until his death, in Springfield, Ohio, on August 24, 1882. He was much 
respected in his community. 

Milo John was one of two children of his parents, his brother Charles 
R., now living in Colorado. Milo attended the public schools, and Witten- 
burg College at Springfield. He entered the drug business and worked at it 
there for three years and a half. For the same length of time he was engaged 
in the business at Columbus, then returned to Springfield for a year. In 1884 
he came to Clinton, Iowa, and went into partnership with George Bacon, at the 
corner of Fifth avenue and Third street, under the name of John & Bacon, 
continuing four years, when Mr. John, having meanwhile married, sold out 
and went to Des Moines. Four years later he returned to Clinton, and there, 
with John Smith and H. E. By rum, now the second vice-president of the 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy railroad, organized the Clinton Fruit & Prod- 
uce Company. This lasted three years, then, in 1896, Mr. John bought out 
the business at his old stand, and has since carried on a drug store and phar- 
macy at that place, under the name of Milo J. John & Company, the store being 
one of the best appointed and largest in the city. Mr. John is a director and 
vice-president of the Tri-City Telephone Company. In politics he is a 
Republican, but frequently votes independently. He is a Scottish Rite Mason, 
and is a member of Emulation Lodge, Keystone Chapter, Holy Cross Com- 
mandery and Cincinnati Consistory. He is a member of the military order of 
the Loyal Legion, being qualified for membership as the son of an ofiicer who 
served in the war of the Rebellion. 

]\Ir. John was married on Octol)er 20, 1887, to ]\Iaude Thayer, second 
daughter of Judge E. H. Thayer, an old settler here, though she was born in 
Muscatine. They are the parents of two children, Dorette and Edward, a 
student in the Clinton high school. 

]\Ir. John is prominent in many circles of Clinton, is a business man of 
high order, and one who has deservedly many friends in the city and county. 



832 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

WALDA M. GRUMSTRUP. 

No wide-awake student of modern conditions can fail to perceive the 
industrial problems which threaten us, and to realize that there must soon 
be a readjustment of such conditons, or else, if such does not pe-acefully take 
place, there will be a violent settlement. Of course, all hope for a peaceful 
and gradual adjustment, but the measures necessary to relieve the evil condi- 
tions are all more or less socialistic. Government is trending slowly in a social- 
istic direction, and many of the old party leaders today are uttering state- 
ments which would have branded them as rabid Socialists a few years ago. 
Perhaps we shall never see pure socialism, but all parties are now uniting on 
schemes socialistic in their nature, and we cannot tell what progress may 
bring forth. 

Walda j\I. Grumstrup was born in Denmark on July 12, 1869, a son of 
Nis and Christena (Everson) Grumstrup. His parents were natives of Den- 
mark, and in 1871 the family came to America, first locating in Delaware, 
where Nis engaged in railroad work. In 1872 he removed to Chnton, Iowa, 
where he was employed one year by C. Lamb & Sons, then was employed in 
Curtis Brothers' sash and door factory for about twenty years. In 1893 he 
entered the flour and feed business, in which he prospered, and remained in 
this until 1908, when he retired. His life has been cjuiet and mostly devoted 
to his business and his family. He and his wife are still living. They are 
the parents of two sons and three daughters, all living. 

Walda Grumstrup was educated in the Clinton common schools, and at 
the early age of ten or twelve learned the woodturner's trade, and had charge 
of Curtiss Brothers' department of wood turning for about sixteen years. 
Then in 1908 he bought one-fourth of the stock of the Anderson Furniture 
Company, and since then has been president of that concern. This company 
employs about fifty men, and makes extension and library tables and kitchen 
cabinets. Their business extends over Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, Illinois, 
South Dakota, and is spreading to other states. Their trade has had a slow, 
steady and healthy growth. Since Mr. Grumstrup has been president he 
has added a great deal of improved machinery. 

In 1892 Mr. Grumstrup was married to Johanna Johnson, a native of 
New Zealand, who received the most of her education in that country, her 
parents coming to this country when she was twelve. She was the daughter 
of August P. Johnson, a native of Sweden, and Elsie Marrie Geertsen, a 
native of Denmark. Mr. and Mrs. Grumstrup are the parents of three chil- 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 833 

(Iren, Harold, in the class of 1911, Clinton high school; Helga, class of 1912, 
and Loretta. 

Air. (irunistrup is a Republican in politics, hut has read widch' on scjcial- 
ism. and has made a study of socialistic doctrines. He is a member of the 
Odd b>llo\vs. and w ill soon ha\e Ijeen a member of that order twenty years. 
He is also a member of the Danish Society of ^Mystic Workers. On religious 
subjects he is very liberal, and has ne\er affiliated with any church. He 
lias thoroughly demonstrated his ability as a business man and a thorough 
manager, and has caused his factor}- to prosper during his administration. 
Personally he is popular among the citizens of Clinton. 



HON. JOHN L. WILSON. 

WHienever a resident of Clinton county is asked to name the most promi- 
nent farmers of the count}-, there is one name, that of John L. A\'ilson, of the 
W^alnut Stock farm, which always comes immediately to mind. Mr. A\'ilson 
was born on October 25, 1857, on the farm where he now resides, the son of 
Alatthew and Sybbila (Rugh) Wilson, both natives of Pennsylvania, where 
they were married. Matthew Wilson was the son of John and Nancy W^ilson. 
Jolm A\'ils()n came to America from Ireland with his parents, who settled in 
Allegheny county, Pennsyhania, w lien he was eight }-ears old. He spent his 
life as a farmer, and died in Allegheny county. In politics he was a strong 
Democrat, but ne\er cared to hold office. His religious affiliations were with 
the Presbyterian church. 

yi. J. Stick, the maternal uncle of Sybbila AA'ilson, was a Lutheran 
minister, a nati\-e of Germany, who filled important charges. He was also a 
Democrat, and died in Pennsy[\ania. His profession made him widely known 
and he was highly respected and had the confidence and respect of the people. 
He reared a large family of children. 

Matthew Wilson was the second son in a family of three sons and three 
daughters. Until he was twenty-two years of age he remained at home, then 
engaged in steamboating on the Ohio and lower Mississippi rivers, as a mate. 
In these times the ri\-er offered many attractions to a young man of spirit. 
W'liile encased on the river Air. Wilsc^n was married and soon left steamboat- 
ing to go to a farm in Penns}l\ania. But. seeking greater opportunities, he 
came to Chntou county, Iowa, in 1855, and rented a farm for two years. He 
brought with him to this countv, his wife and one child, a wagon and team of 

(53) 



834 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

horses, and four hundred dohars in money. In 1856 he bought eighty acres 
which had on it a cheap house, and began to improve the land. He continued 
to add to his holdings until he owned three hundred and ninety acres of farm 
land and ninety acres of timber land in Clinton county, and five hundred and 
twenty acres in Story county, Iowa, with two hundred acres under culti\'a- 
tion. He was a hard working man, a good financier and had a good helpmate, 
and together they accumulated a large estate. Chnton county was new and 
undeveloped when he entered it and he helped the moral and social develop- 
ment bv all means in his power, aiding in laying the foundations of good 
government. His property was accumulated by general farming and stock 
raising, the surplus being very satisfactorily invested in lands. His judgment 
and business abilities were much above the average. In politics Matthew 
Wilson was an uncompromising Democrat, but he preferred not to hold office. 
Having grown up in the Presbyterian faith, he ne\'er departed from it. Wide- 
ly known and highly respected, his honor and integrity were never impeached. 
On August ij, 1884, he departed this life; his wife had been called on May 
17, 1883. She was a devoted member of the Lutheran church. Four chil- 
dren were born to their union, of whom the oldest, Alartha, and the youngest, 
Benjamin F., died in infancy. Anna M.. the second child, married James 
Robb, and they lived for some years on the Story county farm, which was 
given to his daughter by ^Ir. AA'ilson. On account of poor health they rented 
the farm and moved to Colorado, where they are now living on a fruit farm. 
John L. Wilson was reared to farming and stock raising. He attended 
the district school, and the Clinton Business College,' graduating from the 
latter February 18, 1876. By his father's will he obtained the homestead as 
his portion, to w liich h.e has added one hundred and forty acres, making his 
total holdings over five hundred acres, among the largest in the county. While 
carrying on general farming, he has given his attention most prominently 
to the breeding of standard high-grade stock, Percheron horses. Chester White 
swine and Polled Durham cattle, all registered. His home place, the Walnut 
Stock Farm, is one of the l)est in the state. It is well watered and arranged 
for stock and highly improved. It is situated about six and one-half miles 
from Clinton, and is well equipped with two large barns and other outbuild- 
ings, and a large three-story house, making a very valualjle and desirable prop- 
erty. Mr. Wilson is also a stockholder and director in the First National 
Bank of Lyons and has many other interests. 

Mr. Wilson has always affiliated with the Democratic partv and is a 
strong advocate of Democratic principles, being one of the leaders of his party 
in the county and state. For many years he has worked in the party harness, 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 835 

filling township and local offices, and serving as committeeman on the county 
central committee. In 1894 he was elected to the lower house of the General 
Assembly of the state of Iowa, held this office during the twenty-fifth and 
twenty-sixth sessions of the Assembly and at the expiration of his term was 
elected to upper house or Senate for the twenty-seventh to the thirty-third 
sessions, inclusive, and has just been elected for four years more, holding the 
reco.rd for the long'est term of continuous service in tlie Legislature of any 
man in Iowa. His service has been very satisfactor}- to his constituents, even 
more so than is con\"enient for ]\Ir. \\'ilson. For a number of }'ears he has 
sought to retire from politics, but the people nominate and elect him without 
consulting his feehngs, a true case of the office seeking the man. Mr. \\'"ilson, 
by his long term of ser\ice and extensive acquaintance in the state capital, is 
able to give to his constituents valuable ser\ice, and he has Ijeen a member of 
many important committees, in the last session holding the position of chair- 
man of the public lands committee, and serving on the committees on ways 
and means, appropriations, agriculture, schools, cities and towns, telegraph 
and telephones, and highways, a list including many of the most important 
committees, while the chairmanship which he held is one of the most respon- 
sible gi\en to a member of the minority party. 

^Ir. A\'ilson is a consistent member of the Lutheran church. In fraternal 
relations he is a Mason of the thirty-second degree, and a member of the 
Knights of Pythias and Eastern Star. 

John L. ^^'ilson was married on December 15, 1880. to Susie E. Cook, 
born in Clinton county. September 25, i860, the daughter of John B. and 
Rebecca (Miller) Cook, both natives of Ohio, where they were married. ^Iv. 
Cook was a farmer and carpenter, one of the earliest settlers of Clinton county, 
who became prominent and well-known. He was a strong Republican, but 
ne\er aspired to office. His death occiu'red on December 30, 1906: his widow 
now li\es at Lyons, to which cit}' the}- had retired. They were the parents 
of eight children: The oldest died in infancy: Martha married Robert Boyd, 
who died, leaving one daughter, and ■^he later married A. E. Boynton : George 
F. is a farmer; Susie E. is the wife of the subject; Perry R., a traveling sales- 
man: \\'illiam, deceased, was a contractor; Anna died at the age of thirteen: 
Robert was clerk on a steamboat, and was accidentally drowned. 

'Sly. and Mrs. Wilson are the parents of five children : Anna E. died May 
2, 1891, aged nine years and se\-en months: Charles was born October 30, 
1883; Ollie R. died May 10, 1891, aged .five years and three months, she and 
Anna dying of diphtheria: John L.. Jr.. was born November 17, 1887: Clara 
V. was born August 26. 1892. The children are at home and assist in carrv'- 



836 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

ing on the farm. Afrs. W^iTson is a lady of much refinement and intelHgence 
and is an active member of the Episcopal church. ]\Ir. Wilson has truly a 
happy domestic life, and has been fortunate in this, as well as in material 
success. 



TOHX T. BLODT. 



Druggists deal very largely in the necessities and conveniences of life. 
No other merchants keep so varied a line as they and no others have so much 
responsibility, for a mistake in filling a prescription may cost lives, while in 
almost any other mercantile business a mistake can only mean the loss of 
money. The druggist is the' one merchant who keeps open at almost all 
hours; he is the one who is always ready to supply our wants, if it be only to 
serve a cooling drink, or to fill a highly important prescription, or to sell tis 
some little article of convenience. AA^hen we stop to consider the endless 
variety of articles which we purchase from the druggist, we can no longer 
wonder that, next to the grocer, the druggist is the most necessary of all 
merchants. Anrl the city of Clinton has no better supplied drug store, nor 
none where service is more obliging, than that of ]\Ir. Blodt. 

John J. Blodt was born in Lyons, now a part of Clinton, Iowa, May 17. 
1865. ^^i^ ^^o" o^ Matthias and Elizabeth (Hassler) Blodt. His parents were 
born in Baden, Germany, and came to America in about 1850. They first 
located in Ohio, but removed to Lyons in 1858, where Mr. Blodt established a 
baker's shop. He was a hardworking, industrious man and gave his entire 
attention to his trade. He died in 1887. His wife is now living in Clinton. 
Six of their eight children are living. 

John T- Blodt was educated in the Central school of Lyons and Clinton, 
now the Jefferson school. He then spent two years in ]\Iilwaukee College, 
?nd one year in ]\It. Calvarv College, in Wisconsin. In 1886 he returned to 
Clinton and liegan to work in the drug store of Milo J. John, staying with him 
five years. In 1891 he went west, and the next year returned and married. 
He v>as employed in different drug stores and for several years had charge of 
W. M. Desmond's .store. In 1901 he bought the store at Xo. 118 South Sec- 
ond street and in 190:^ built a store of his own at No. 116 South Second 
street. Here he is still located and has more than doubled his business since 
starting. In politics he is a Democrat. He is a member of the Modern 
Woodmen of America, of the Eraternal Order of Eagles, Royal Arcanum and 
Knights of Pythias, of which he was for five years chairman of the board of 
trustees, and now is secretary. 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 837 

Mr. Blodt was married in 1892 to Ida L. Bagley. of Clinton, daughter 
of George W. and Mary Jane Bagley. old residents of Clinton. To their 
union two children ha\e been born, Alarguerite and Harold John. 

]\Ir. Blodt is well thought of and highly regarded by those who best 
know him. In business he is alert and aggressive and thus has prospered and 
has encouraging future prospects. He takes much pride in the appearance 
and stocking of his store. 



MATZEN & HANSEN. 

Herein we mention a firm composed of young and enterprising busi- 
ness men, who have been engaged but a short time in their present business, 
but in that short time have shown their ecjuipment in the qualities which 
make for success and the results of their training in the school of experience, 
and they have taken their place in the front rank of Clinton's commercial life. 

Frank Joseph Matzen was born in Clinton, Iowa. May 12, 1879, the 
son of Peter Matzen, born in Germany, and Anna (Traeger) Matzen, born 
in Galena, Illinois, August 22, 1855. Peter Matzen came to America when 
a voune man. and for manv vears conducted a retail clothing store in Clin- 
ton under the name of Matzen & Bockel Company. Later in life he was 
eneraeed in the insurance business, in which he continued until his death, in 
188 1. He was a man of strong character and highly respected. He and his 
wife were the parents of four children, Frank Joseph, Mrs. Anna Maxheim, 
Peter and Mrs. Louise Hansen. The mother died when Frank Joseph was 
five years old. 

Frank Matzen was educated in the Clinton schools and in 1895 began 
working for W. L. Hale, the grocer, and continued with him until he went 
out of business, gaining under him much valuable experience. On June 25, 
19 TO, he and John C. Hansen bought out the old Hale grocery, one of the 
first established in Clinton, and have since been conducting it. 

Mr. Matzen was married on December 15, 1905, to Clara E. Hansen, 
who was born in Clinton, the daughter of Godber and \\'ipke Hansen. 

lohn C. Hansen was born in Clinton, Iowa, December 27, 1870, the 
son of Godber Hansen, who was born in Germany in December, 1843, ^"d 
Wipke (Tolk) Hansen, born in Germany :\Iarch 7, 1846. Godber Hansen 
and his wife came to this country in 1865 or 1866, and were married in 1868 
in Clinton, Iowa. In the early eighties Mr. Hansen entered the retail gro- 
cery business, and continued in it until 1890. Since that time he has been 
engaged as a general contractor. He served the Democratic party as county 



838 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

supervisor from 1889 to 1893, and has also been alderman from the first 
ward of Clinton. He has been faithful to the interests of the people in his 
official capacities, and has gained the esteem of those who know him. John 
C. Hansen has two brothers, Alfred and Fred G., and four sisters, Minnie, 
Mrs. Clara Matzen, Mrs. Amanda Hagen and Alma. 

John C. Hansen attended the Clinton public schools, then for five years 
he worked for his father in his grocery store. For three years he was en- 
gaged in bridge building, then from 11891 until 1900 was in the Clinton fire 
department, following which for ten years he was in the saloon business, 
for six years of that time in the Turner Hall. In June, 19 10, he entered with 
his brother-in-law, Frank J. Matzen, as partner in a retail grocery at No. 
216 South Fourth street. Fraternally, he is a member of the Turner So- 
ciety and of the Eagles. 

Mr. Hansen was married on April 18, 1894, to Christine Andresen, 
who was born in Clinton, the daughter of Julius and Eliza Andresen, early 
settlers of Clinton. (See sketch elsewhere of the Andresen family.) They 
are the parents of the following children: Alvin, Ethel, Leona, Edna, 
Hilma, Edwin, Louis, and Harold, deceased. They are as bright and attrac- 
tive a family of young people as one would wish to see. 

Mr. ]\Iatzen and Mr. Hansen are courteous and accommodating, ener- 
getic and enterprising, and have many friends. They are the proprietors of 
a verv neat grocery, in which their goods are well arranged for display, and 
show that they thoroughly understand the essentials of their business. They 
handle a fresh line of staple and fancy groceries of every kind, and enjoy a 
large and constantly increasing patronage. 



OLIN E. HILL. 



A young man who by careful attention to his work and by thorough 
grounding in the ])rinciples of the responsible profession of pharmacist, has 
made his place of business one of the best known and most frequented of its 
kind in the city, and who has gained for himself a reputation for reliability, 
progressiveness and sterling character, — to write of such a man is a pleasing 
task. 

Olin E. Hill was born in Clinton. Iowa, son of Joseph and Dora S. 
(Smith) Hill. His father was born in Massachusetts, his mother in Vermont, 
and they came to Iowa in 1863. and located in Clinton, where his father had 
charge of the waterworks west of the city for the Chicago & Northwestern 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 839 

railroad many years. They were the parents of seven children, of whom 
six are living. The mother is living- and the father died in 1896. He lived a 
quiet life, and gave his entire attention to his work and his family, in which 
he took much pleasure and pride. 

Olin Hill received his earlier education in the public schools of Clinton, 
and later attended the Chicago College of Pharmacy, from which he gradu- 
ated. On January i, 1896. he became a partner of Mr. Ludolph in the drug 
business, under the firm name of Ludolph & Hill. This partnership continued 
for ten years when Mr. Hill bought Mr. Ludolph out and continues the busi- 
ness at the same location, No. 922 South Fourth street, in the same room in 
which, as a l)()y. l:e worked ;ind learned the beginnings of the luisiness. and 
first found his bent towards his present profession. In politics he is a Repub- 
lican and both he and his wife are members of the Methodist church. His 
fraternal membership is with the Emulation Lodge of Masons, the Odd Fel- 
lows, and the American Lodge of Alodern Woodmen of America. 

Mr. Hill .was married on June 2, 1897, to Lula M. Smith, a native of 
Clinton, daughter of George S. Smith. No children have been born to them, 
but they have adopted one child. 

Mr. Hill is much devoted to his business, and is a man whose life and 
character speak for themselves of their worth to those who know him, of 
whom there are many in Clinton, and many who are glad to consider him their 
friend. 



HOBART E. MARTIN, M. D. 

To the ambitious man of scientific tastes nothing offers a more inviting 
profession than medicine. Much as has been accomplished in that realm, 
our knowledge is still comparatively vague and brief, and the young man of 
medical training, with clear and acute senses and good reasoning powers, is 
situated where he has endless opportunities for discoveries which may further 
the cause of health, add to human knowledge and bring to him the conscious- 
ness of merited achievement. 

Hobart E. Martin was born in Lancaster, New Hampshire, March i, 
1878. the son of George A. and Addie (Snow) Martin, his father born in New 
York, his mother in New Hampshire. His paternal grandparents were Albert 
and Carrie Martin, who spent their lives in New York. His maternal grand- 
parents were Dr. Louis and Harriet (Hobart) Snow, who resided in New 
Hampshire throughout their lives. Harriet Hobart was a sister of the father 
of Garrett A. Hobart. who was Vice-President under President McKinley. 



840 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

George A. Alartin was a member of the Vermont Volunteer Infantry 
and served throughout the war, being for a while in the hospital corps. After 
the war he went to New Hampshire and was married. He lived there until 
1895. when he moved to Boone, Iowa, where he died in 1897. All his life he 
was a practicing physician, a close student who gave all his time to his pro- 
fessional work. His wife died in 1888. They were the parents of two sons, 
both of whom are physicians, and two daughters. 

Hobart E. ]\Iartin was educated at Hyde Park, Massachusetts, and 
graduated in medicine from the Iowa State University in 1901. He practiced 
in Elvira, Iowa, for six years, and then moved to Lyons, where he has since 
engaged in practice. In politics he is a Republican. He is a member of the 
Iowa State and of the Rock River Medical Societies, and in his fraternal re- 
lations is an Elk. His wife and children are members of the Episcopal church. 

Mr. Martin was married on November 28, 1900, to Bertha Phillips, a 
native of West Liberty, Iowa, and daugliter of N. M. and Mary Philips, who 
came here from Virginia at an early time. To their union three bright and 
interesting children have been born, Hobart E.. Jr., Muriel and Vivian. 

Doctor Martin is a young man of great promise. He is enjoying a com- 
paratively large practice and has been successful. He possesses the qualities 
which go to make up the reliable practitioner and has the confidence of the 
people. Personally he is very popular and we are glad to record the history 
of such as he. 



HENRY WARNING. 



It would l)e interesting to trace the evolution of furniture from the 
stones and blocks of wood used as seats in the earliest times and the heaps 
of boughs used as beds, to the light and comfortable chairs and the iron- 
frame beds used today. Perhaps it would be more interesting to trace the 
various styles of furniture which have prevailed throughout the different 
periods, some of them ugly and cumbersome, some of them triumphs of 
artistic merit. The gentleman whose name heads this sketch has long been 
connected with different aspects of the furniture business, and is now con- 
cerned in a factorv which is one of' the important enterprises of Clinton, and 
which turns out a line of furniture well designed, with special attention 
both to artistic ap]^earance and to durability in ser\-ice, in l^oth of which the 
product of his factory excels. 

Henry Warning was born in Stratford, Canada, December 18, 1861, 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 84 1 

the son of Fred and Emily (Kreich) Warning. His parents ^\ ere natives 
of Germany and came t(^ Canada single, at the respective ages of seventeen 
and fourteen, and settled in Montreal. Fred Warning was a carpenter hy 
trade, and in 1864 moved to Chicago and was there engaged in contracting 
until his death. He gave his attention almost entirely to his trade and Ids 
familv and was a much respected man. He died November i. 1907. and his 
wife on March 14, 1893. They were the parents of seven children, five of 
whom are still living. 

Henrv Warning attended the common schools of the city of Chicago. 
He learned the woodturner's trade, and followed that from 1877 until 1906. 
He lived in Chicago until 1897, when he mo^'ed to Lyons, Iowa, and here 
followed the same trade with M. A. Disbrow & Company. In 1906, in com- 
pan}' with the two Messrs. Grumstrup, mentioned in this work, lie bought 
out the Anderson Furniture Company and they reorganized it and ha\e since 
carried it on. In politics. IMr. AA'arning is generally a Republican, but some- 
times ^'otes independently. His family are members of the ]\Iethodist church, 
Init he is lil)eral in religious \-iews. Fraternally, he is a member of the Odd 
Fellows and of the Modern Woodmen. 

]\Ir. A\"arning was married on May 25, 1887, to Theresa Weiss, daughter 
of John and Mary Weiss, old settlers of Saginaw, Michigan. They are the 
parents of four children : Edna, deceased ; Gertrude, a teacher in the public 
schools of Clinton county; Caroline, a student of the Lyons high school, in 
her junior year ; and Willard, a jiupil in the common schools. 

Mr. AA'arning is thoroughly familiar with the furniture business, having 
learned all liranches of the industry thoroughly, and is a competent business 
man. He has many friends in the city and is highly respected. 



REUBEN CHARLES HART. 

One of the younger citizens of Clinton, who has stamped the impress of 
his strong individuality upon the minds of the people of Clinton county in 
such a manner as to render him one of the conspicuous characters of this 
locality, is Reuben Charles Hart, the well known and able civil engineer. He 
was born on June 21, 1870, at Lyons, Iowa, and is the son of John S. and 
Harriet (Clark) Hart. The father is the son of Philip and Mary (Mc- 
Mahon) Hart. Philip Hart came to this countiy from Ireland where he was 
born in 1811, reaching Canada in 1832. He was a Democrat and a devout 
Roman Catholic. 



842 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

John S. Hart came to Lyons, Iowa, in 1866, later moving to Clinton 
where he was in business for many years. He is a Democrat and thirty- 
second-degree Alason. 

Reuben C. Hart was educated in the schools of Clinton, and, entering the 
service of the Chicago & Northwestern railroad, obtained, while in the civil 
engineering department of this road, a practical education in civil engineering, 
which profession he now follows. After ten years in railroad work, he 
entered the service of the city of Clinton in March, 1902, as assistant city 
engineer. In November, 1902, he was elected to the office of county sur- 
veyor and in March, 1908, to that of city engineer of Clinton, both of which 
offices he still holds. He is an associate member of the American Society of 
Civil Engineers, charter member of the American Society of Engineering 
Contractors and a member of the Iowa Engineering Society. As a public 
servant his course has been marked by fidelity to duty and a high grade of 
ability. Politically, he is a Democrat, and is prominent in political affairs, 
also in lodge circles, being a thirty-second-degree Mason. 

^Ir. Hart was married in 1895 to Martha Connor, of Clinton, and they 
have resided in this citv since that time. 



ERIC C. MATSON. 



That America still means "opportunity" is evidenced in the case of Mr. 
Matson, still a comparatively young man, who came to this country at the 
age of twenty with no fortune save his own clear brain and strong body and 
the inheritance of the good Danish blood, which flows in the veins of a race 
of powerful men of marked capabilities and endowments. With nothing 
save this equipment, he has brought himself through various vicissitudes of 
fortune to the position of one of the prosperous business men of his city, 
owing his advancement to the aid of no one and being truly self-made. 

Eric C. Matson was born in Denmark on September 2, i860. He re- 
ceived his education in the excellent schools of his native country and, feel- 
ing that opportunities would be greater in the new world, he came to Amer- 
ica in 1880. not stopping until he reached Clinton, Iowa, which has since 
been his home. He was a general workingman up until 1895, '^vhen he bought 
a line of oil tank wagons from Ham Blackledge, an old settler, and for fif- 
teen vears was engaged in this business, in which he accumulated quite a 
little property. In 19 10 ]\Ir. Alatson purchased the North\vestern Steam 
Laundrv, and in the short time that he has been its owner has thoroughly 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 843 

demonstrated his capacity in its management. This is a steam laundry, 
with full modern equipment, capable of doing the best of work and with 
the best of facilities for quick and complete service. Mr. Alatson believes in 
satisfying his patrons, and by doing so is building up an increased business, 
every day gaining in amount. In politics Mr. Matson is independent, vot- 
ing for the man whom he thinks will best fill the office and not for a party 
emblem. Fraternally, he is a member of the Danish Brotherhood. 

In April, 1885, Eric C. Matson was married to Hansina Anderson, of 
Clinton, wlio was born in Germany. To this union five children have been 
born, namely : Arthur, now of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma ; Walter, of 
Clinton; Helen and Frances, at home; and Olga, who is the bookkeeper in 
her father's laundry. 

Mr. Matson is a business man of recognized integrity and keen acu- 
men. Beginning life with nothing, in a foreign countiy, he has by his own 
efforts gained a competence and lifted himself to a position of honor and 
influence, commanding the respect of his neighbors. He has many friends, 
who are glad because of his success. 



JERRY WOLFE, V. S. 

In his chosen field of endeavor Dr. Jerry Wolfe, of Grand Alound, 
Orange township, Clinton county, has achieved success such as few attain 
and his present eminent standing among the veterinary surgeons of eastern 
Iowa is duly recognized and appreciated not only in his own town and town- 
ship, ])ut throughout the county and in adjoining localities, and as a citizen 
he easily ranks with the most progressive and influential in his vicinity. His 
course has ever been above suspicion, and those favored with an intimate ac- 
quaintance with him are profuse in their praise of his many virtues and up- 
right character. 

Doctor Wolfe is a native of Liberty township, Clinton county, Iowa, 
having been born here on August 16, 1875, and he is the son of James B. 
and Anna (O'Connor) Wolfe, and a nephew of Judge P. B. Wolfe, well 
known in judicial circles of Clinton county. The father was born in Ire- 
land, and the mother's birth occurred in Jackson county, Iowa. 

The Doctor was reared on a farm, where he worked in the fields dur- 
ing the summer months and attended the public schools in the wintertime at 
Lost Nation. Later he spent three years at the Iowa State Teachers' Col- 
lege, and one year at the State Agricultural College at Ames, Iowa. He ap- 



844 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

plied himself very closely to his text-books and made rapid progress, receiv- 
ing a high education along general lines. Deciding to turn his attention to 
veterinary surgery, he took the course at the Chicago Veterinary College, 
from which he was graduated with honor in 1905. Soon afterwards he re- 
turned to Clinton county and located at Grand Mound, where he has since 
remained, having been very successful from the first, and he has built up a 
large and e^'er-growing patronage, his services being in great demand. He 
has lieen very successful in his chosen calling and he keeps abreast of the 
times in all discoveries, research work and whatever pertains to veterinary 
surgery. 

While in college Doctor Wolfe was the champion foot racer of the 
state of Iowa, and he has thirty-seven gold medals and seventeen silver 
medals. He became widely known as a foot racer and athlete. 

The Doctor is chief of the fire department at Grand Mound, and he has 
built up a very proficient and reliable force of fire fighters here. Politically, 
he is a Democrat, and he and his family are members of the Catholic church 
and faithful in their attendance and support of the same. 

On February 11, 1909, the marriage of Doctor W^olfe and Mary Wiley, 
of Chicago, was solemnized. She is a native of Horton, Kansas, having 
been born on August 23, 1887. She is a lady of education and culture and 
the representative of an excellent and highly honored family. To the Doc- 
tor and wife one child, James Wiley, has been born, his birth being recorded 
as April 7, 1910. Doctor Wolfe is a life member of the Chicago Veterinary 
Societv. 



CLINTON BUSINESS COLLEGE. 

No history of Clinton county, Iowa, would l3e complete were there fail- 
ure to give a conspicuous review^ of the Clinton Business College, which is 
under the able management of B. J. Heflin, whose every effort to advance the 
cause of education here has been promptly recognized and appreciated, the 
business i)ul)lic co-operating to make this one of the most thorough and pop- 
ular institutions of its kind in the state. During the past years of its organ- 
ization as an institution established to promote the highest principles of busi- 
ness education, it has based its claim upon merit alone. The success achieved 
has been accomplished by devotion to the individual wants and requirements of 
those who have come within its doors seeking the practical things of life, and 
by strict fidelity to all students. The watchword of the institution has ever 
been "Progress," and no legitimate effort has ever been spared to promote the 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. . 845 

interest of its patrons and the advancement of the pupils. Many years of 
faithful Avork have earned for this school the reputation it now enjoys. 
Thousands of dollars invested in the furnishing of appliances for the comfort 
and advancement of its students, and the selection of teachers who exactly fill 
their places, is an indelible stamp upon its loyalty. 

The Clinton Business College is fortunately located in one of the best 
cities in the state, which offers special advantages to those contemplating tak- 
ing a course in a first-class business college, and at the same time prospecting 
for a more permanent position or paying business than they now have. The 
reason for this is, Clinton has more enterprise, better natural facilities, more 
railroads, and more money invested in manufacturing enterprises, and is en- 
joying better growth than any other city in the state. This college is located 
at Xos. 101-103 Fifth avenue, covering over eight thousand five hundred 
scjuare feet of floor space, situated on the second floor of the Shoecraft block, 
a central location in a healthful part of the city, on two street car lines, near 
the railroad depots, and only one block from the principal hotels. The rooms 
are nicely furnished, well lighted and ventilated, heated by steam and fitted 
with gas and electric lights, pleasant and easy of access. School is in session 
throughout the year except on legal holidays and a short vacation in August. 
The work in this school is so arranged that pupils may enter at any time and 
the}' are placed in suitable classes. The year's work is not divided into terms, 
and examinations are held at the end of each month. A valuable course of 
lectures is given during the school year, by the business and professional 
men of the city. This school has alwa}'s striven for neatness, accuracv and 
speed, and superior results haAC l^een reached. The reasonable but firm disci- 
pline which daily surrounds the student in this school tends to establish habits 
that ])usiness men will commend. Every detail of actual ofiice work that can 
be incorporated into the work of a school has been added here, the students 
receiving the most practical kind of training, so, practically, nothing is left 
to be le'irned l)y the pupil when he enters the office of his employer. The 
touch typewriting system and the Chartier system of shorthand, and all of 
the most advanced, yet most practical and simplest, methods and systems are 
used in this school, hence rapid progress is made and the very liest results ob- 
tained. 

The course of study is interesting and made most attractiA-e to the student, 
being thorough and standard. It includes : Business course, embracing book- 
keeping, arithmetic, commercial law, penmanship, business correspondence, 
grammar, rapid calculation, business practice, spelling; shorthand course, em- 
bracing shorthand, typewriting, grammar, l)usiness correspondence, spelling. 



846 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

arithmetic, rapid calculation, model office work; penmanship ; combined course, 
embracing bookkeeping, business practice, arithmetic, commercial law, pen- 
manship, business correspondence, grammar, spelling, rapid calculation, short- 
hand, typewriting and model office work. 

Air. Heflin is aided by a ven' carefully selected and capable corps of in- 
structors, the best in their departments that can be obtained, and everything is 
under a superb system and remarkaljle results are quickly obtained. The city 
of Clinton is justly proud of such an institution which would be a credit to any 
community, in fact, its value to the industrial life of the locality could not be 
estimated. 

It is a worthv privilege to be able here to acquaint the citizens of Clinton 
county with a brief personal biography of the gentleman who has labored to 
such goodlv ends in building up this meritorious institution, and the closing 
paragraphs of this review will have to do with President Benjamin Heflin, 
who was born December 23. 1869, at Galesburg, Illinois. He is the son of 
Alexander and Matilda (Brown) Heflin, the father born Alay 15, 1839, and 
the mother on April 4, 1844. both natives of Galesburg, Illinois. The elder 
Heflin devoted his life to agricultural pursuits, spending his life on a farm of 
about three hundred acres, which was secured from the government by the 
paternal grandfather, Reuben Heflin, who came to Illinois at a very early 
date, buving the land at one dollar and twenty-five cents per acre. The same 
is now very valuable. Reuben Heflin set out a five-acre orchard, and it was 
not an uncommon sight to see the orchard surrounded liy moving wagons on 
their way west, for the Heflin farm was an excellent place to camp over 
night. 

Alexander Heflin and wife are still living, now being retired, having 
moved from their farm into a cozy home in Galesburg, Illinois. Seven children 
were born to them. 

Benjamin J. Heflin, of this review, received his early education in the 
public schools of Galesburg, subsequently attending the Dixon Normal School, 
from which he was graduated. He was also graduated from the Iowa Com- 
mercial College at Davenport, Iowa. Thus being well equipped for his life 
work, he came to Clinton. Iowa, in 1892, and became president of the Clinton 
Business College and has very faithfully discharged the duties of the same to 
the present time, this institution having had a steady growth under his judi- 
cious management. 

]\Ir. Heflin was married on December 27, 1897, to Gertrude Garrett, and 
this union has been blessed by the 1)irt]i of two children, Benjamin Harrison 
and \\'illiam fackson. 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 847 

WILLIS E. KEITH, M. D. 

There is no class to whom greater gratitude is due from the world at 
large than the self-sacrificing, sympathetic, noble-minded men whose life- 
^vork is the alleviation of suffering and the ministering of comfort to the 
afflicted, to the end that the span of human existence may be lengthened and 
a greater degree of satisfaction enjoyed during the remainder of their sojourn. 
There is no standard by which their beneficent influence can be measured; 
their heli)fu]ness is lin:ited onlv l;y the extent of their knowledge and 
skill, while tlieir power goes hand in hand with the wonderful laws of nature 
that spring from the very source of life itself. Among the physicians and 
surgeons of Clinton county, who. while yet young in years, have risen to 
eminence in their chosen calling and to whom the future fields of endeavor 
beckon with great ])romise is Dr. Willis E. Keith, of Clinton, whose career 
has been that of a broad-minded, conscientious worker in the sphere to which 
his life and energies have been devoted and whose profound knowledge has 
won for him a leading place among the distinguished medical men of east- 
ern Iowa. 

Doctor Keith was born in Clinton. Iowa, on December 14, 1882, and is 
the son of Charles S. and Elizabeth f Guiney) Keith, living at No. 627 Fourth 
avenue. Clinton. He was educated in the Clinton high school and grew to 
maturity in his home city, spending his youth in an uneventful manner. 
Early in life he evinced a laudable ambition to take up the study of medicine 
and he began bending every effort in that direction. He entered the medical 
department of the College of Physicians and Surgeons in the University of 
Illinois, and there made a brilliant record for scholarship, being graduated 
from that institution in 1907. He did hospital \vork in Chicago for nine 
months in order to further equip himself for his life work. Thus well pre- 
pared to engage in general practice, he returned to Clinton county and 
opened an office at Grand Mound, where he remained one year, being very 
successful from the first and soon taking a high rank among the medical men 
of this locality. In 1908 he went to Lost Nation, where he enjoyed a still 
larger patronage. He recently went to Europe, taking post-graduate work 
on eye. ear, throat and nose in London, Vienna and Berlin; he also took post- 
graduate work in New York and Philadelphia, and he will no (loul)t 
make great strides as a surgeon and general practitioner, having had the 
very best training which the world offers in medical science, and knowing 
his keen powers of observation and acute faculties for assimilation, he will 
no doubt make the most of every advantage. On his return from Europe 
Doctor Keith located in Clinton, where he is now engaged in th.e active practice 
of his profession. 



848 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

The Doctor has remained unmarried. In politics he is a Republican, 
and in 1910 he was a candidate for county coroner, his candidacy being 
looked upon with much favor by all, irrespective of party alignment, for all 
recognized his ability to serve exceptionally well in this important office. 
He is a member of the Nu Sigma Nu medical fraternity, and fraternally he 
belongs to the Masonic Blue Lodge and Order of the Eastern Star at Lost 
Nation, also the DeMolay Consistory at Clinton. 



ALF. E. CORRELL. 



The subject of this sketch, a leading farmer of Berlin township and a 
representative of two old and highly esteemed famihes of eastern Iowa, is a 
native of Clinton county and dates his birth from February 12, 1866. His 
paternal ancestors were among the early settlers of Cumberland county, 
Pennsylvania, where his grandfather, Jacob Correll. son of Abraham and 
Anna Correll, was born in the year 181 5. Jacob Correll went to Wayne 
county, Ohio, in 1836, and was there married on March 19. 1839, to Cath- 
erine Floyd, whose birth occurred in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, Au- 
gust II, 1814. After living in Ohio until 1854, this couple moved to Clinton 
county, Iowa, and took up a tract of government land in Berlin township, 
which Air. Correll' improved and converted into a fine farm and on which 
the two spent the remainder of their lives. Among the children of Jacob and 
Catherine Correll was a son Abram. who was born in Wayne county, Ohio, 
July 25, 1840, and who married in his young manhood Alma Simpson, who 
was born March 10, 1841, in Onondaga county. New York, having been a 
daughter of John and Mary (Walrod) Simpson, also natives of the Empire 
state. In the fall of 1847 the Simpsons moved to St. Clair county, ^Michigan, 
where they lived the ensuing three years, then settled in Clinton county, 
Iowa, where they spent the remainder of their lives, Mrs. Simpson dving in 
1863. her husl)an(l three years later. Jacob and Mary (Brant) Walrod, 
parents of Mrs. John Simpson, moved from Cherry A^alley, New York, to 
Onondaga county, that state, in a very early day, being accompanied Iw the 
former's aged mother and three brothers, and were among the early pioneers 
of the locality in which they settled. Mrs. \\'alro(l departed this life aged 
tliirty-seven years, and about 1845 James, the ekler son. moved to Clinton 
county, Iowa, where he figured (|uite conspicuously during the pioneer period. 

Abram Correll moved with his parents to Clinton county, Iowa, in 1854, 




MR. AND MRS. ALF. E. CORRELL 



THE N'EV/ WRK 

PUBLIC LIBllARY 



\ 



ASTOR, LENOX, AND 

TILDT^N FOUNDATIONS 

R L 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 849 

and the t\)ll()\ving year located in Berlin township, where the Simpson family 
had previously settled. The marriage of Abram Correll and Alma Simpson, 
referred to abo\e. was solemnized in 1862. two years after which he bought 
the farm of eightv acres now owned by his son, the subject of this sketch, 
and in duo time became one of the leading agriculturists and representative 
citizens of the township. He served in various official capacities, including 
two and one-half years as county supervisor, sex'eral terms as township 
trustee, and took an active part in pul)lic affairs, having l)een a local leader 
of considerable importance in the community. He reared a famil}- of seven 
children, five of whom are living, and ched on Februar}- 19, 1909, his faithful 
wife and companion departing this life on the 29th of March ensuing. Daniel 
and Samuel Correll, brothers of Abram, serA-ed with distinction in the late 
Civil war. and Horace Simpson, a brother of ]\Irs. Correll, was a soldier also 
and earned an honorable record for bravery during the Rebellion. 

The early life of Alf. E. Correll was about the same as that of the 
majority of lads reared in the rural districts, having Ijeen dixided Ijetween 
labor in the fields during the spring and summer seasons, and in the district 
schools during the winter m.gnths. Amid the bracing air of the countr}' and 
under the wholesome influence of his excellent parents, he grew up with a 
proper appreciation of life and its responsibilities, and after the death of his 
father he bought two hundred acres of the home farm and applied his en- 
ergies to agriculture and stock raising. Since then his progress has l)een 
continuous and eminently satisfactory and today he ranks among the leading- 
farmers of his township and county, besides gaining a wide reputation for 
his success as a breeder and raiser of stock, making high-grade cattle and hogs 
his specialties. 

]\lr. Correll is a Republican, and while zealous in upholding the princi- 
ples of his party, he can hardly be called a politician, much less an aspirant 
for puldic preferment. However, he has ser\-ed his township one term as 
clerk and could have any office w ithin the gift of the people did he see fit to 
accept such honors. He keeps abreast of the times on the great questions 
concerning which pul)lic sentiment is dixided and, l)eing a reader and close 
obser\'er, he has broad and lilieral \'iews of men and affairs, which he ex- 
presses freely and fearlessly when it seems necessary to do so. Fraternally, 
he is an infiuential member of the Odd Fellows and Pythian orders and in his 
relations with his fellow-men endeavors to exemplify the beautiful and sub- 
lime principles upon which these organizations are leased. Personally, he is 
genial and companionable, the soul of honor in all his dealings, and his 
character and integrity ha\e been above the breath of suspicion. 

(54) 



850 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

On Janiiarv 2^, ^^93,' '^^'^s solemnized the marriage of ^Ir. Correll and 
Fannie Cortright, of Page connty. Iowa, whose parents. Joseph and Eliza- 
beth Jane (Bnrket) Cortright. are among the well-known and highly es- 
teemed members of the commnnit}' in which they live. ]\Ir. Cortright is a 
native of Pennsylvania, his wife having been born and reared near Dixon, 
Illinois. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Correll is without issue, neverthe- 
less thev are greatly interested in young people, and have made themselves 
quite popular among the juveniles of their neighborhood. 

^[r. Cortright. father of ]\Irs. Correll. served with great distinction 
through the entire Civil war, as did two of liis brothers. The same should 
be said of a brother of Airs. Correll's mother, he having also served the en- 
tire duration of the Civil war. 



\ATLLTAAI AA^HITE. 



In Lincoln township. Clinton county, are to be found many farmers who 
seem to have a tendency to specialize along some line that strikes their fancy; 
whether this plan is a wise one or not is a debatable Cjuestion, some maintain- 
ing that when such a line of procedure is adhered to that other as equally im- 
portant phases of farm work are neglected and loss thereby incurred. One 
of the agriculturists of Lincoln townsln'p who has made a success of general 
farming, in developing many phases of his vocation, is William AA'hite. He is 
a native of this township, having been l)orn here on November 18, 1859, and 
he is the son of James and Keziah (Dixon) \\'hite ; they were born in Derby, 
Derbyshire. England, and Clearfield. Clearfield county. Pennsylvania, respect- 
ively. The father came to America in 1844 and located in Pittsburg. Hav- 
ing' heard of the new country onening up west of the Alississippi ri^'er. in 
1852, he came west in true pioneer fashion, to Davenport, Iowa, where he 
spent a year. then, in the spring of 1853. ^''^ walked to Clinton county, moving 
to the place on which John Dixon now li\'es. He remained there one year, 
then lie moved to a farm of one hundred and sixty acres, which he had pre- 
viously purchased, and which he broke and improved. In the fall of 1859 
he began erecting large and substantial buildings on his place, and he became 
one of the leading general farmers and stock raisers of that community. His 
death occurred on July 13. 1900. his widow having survived until April 21, 
1905. They were the parents of seven children, six of whom are li\'ing. 

James \\diite. the father, worked seven years on a farm near Pittsburg. 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 85 1 

Pennsylvaiiia, and two years in the mines there, and he married while living 
in Pennsylvania. He took considerable interest in local political affairs and 
held a number of township offices, such as trustee, school director, treasurer 
of the school board, etc. He was instrumental in securing the separation of 
this township from Clinton. 

William White was educated in the common schools of Lincoln town- 
ship, and he was reared on the farm which he worked upon when a mere lad 
and he has made farming his vocation and has. been very successful. When 
his father died he already owned a half section, so he sold the old place and 
kept the one he had. Besides general farming, he pays particular attention 
to raising, feeding and marketing cattle and hogs, no small part of his income 
being derived from this source. However, he is now living in practical re- 
tirement, having recently purchased a home in Clinton \vhere he now resides. 
He is independent in politics. He has been a deleg'ate to state conventions 
and has frequently held local offices. He belongs to the Modern Woodmen of 
America, and in religious matters he is a Presbyterian and a liberal supporter 
of the local church. In fact, he has always been found on the right side of 
all questions. 

Mr. White was married on Jnne 15. 1885, to Mina Ayou, a native of 
Lyons, Iowa, and the daughter of Joseph and Jennie Ayou, old settlers, who 
came here from Canada alwut 1855. Mr. Ayou was a soldier in the Civil war. 
He is still living and is a highly respected citizen of this county. To Mr. and 
Mrs. White three children have been born, namely: James. Ruth, the wife of 
Herbert Paul, and Kittie. 



JAMES PETERSON. 



A well known business man in Clinton is James Peterson, a man who is 
always readv to defend the soundness of his principles and opinions on the 
questions of the dav. a man who is popular \\ith the people of his adopted city, 
and who has been found ready at all times to encourage and aid all laudable 
measures and enterprises for the general good. By a life consistent in motive 
and because of his manv fine qualities, he has earned the sincere regard of all 
who know him. 

Mr. Peterson was born in Denmark, October 20, 1853, ^"'^ '^ the son 
of Henrv and Marv K. Peterson, both also born in Denmark. The father 
was a noted landscape gardener, and he served in this capacity for a period 
of fortv-one ^'ears for one minister and an account of his life and work as a 



852 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

gardener has been written by the government. He is now seventy-eight years 
old and is still active. His wife died several years ago and their only child 
is the subject of this sketch. 

James Peterson was educated in the schools of Denmark and when six- 
teen years of age he came to America and located in Shibula. Iowa. After 
remaining there a short time, he came to Clinton in 1872 and entered the 
lumber establishment of C. Lamb & Sons, and remained in their employ for 
a period of nineteen years, being still interested in that business. He estab- 
lished a small box factory at the intersection of Franklin avenue and the 
Northwestern tracks, employing fifteen or twenty hands, and finally it in- 
creased in magnitude until one hundred hands were employed. 

From 1892 to 1896 Mr. Peterson and Mr. Bell formed a partnership and 
in 1896 the company was incorporated with ]\Ir. Peterson as president and 
treasurer, Mr. Bell as secretary, and Mr. Matthews as vice-president. The 
products of this factory went principally to Iowa, Illinois and Nebraska. 
They made all kinds of wooden boxes and enjoyed a large and increasing pat- 
ronage until they closed the factory and quit the business on May i, 1910. 
At that time Mr. Peterson became interested in the Fish Brothers Wagon 
Works, the officers of the same being George M. Curtis, president; H. W. 
Seaman, vice-president; C. B. Mills, treasurer; F. B. \\'att, secretary. A 
large business is carried on here and an excellent class of work turned out. 

Politically, Air. Peterson is a Republican and he has long taken more or 
less interest in local political affairs. He very alily and faithfully discharged 
the duties of mayor of Clinton for one term. He entered the city council in 
1900 and ser\-e(l four years from the fifth ward. He was also a member of 
the school board for three successive terms, or a period of nine years, from 
1894 to 1903. He has done much for the general good of the city and has 
always been found on the right side of all questions looking to the betterment 
of local conditions. Mr. Peterson belongs to the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks and the Wapsipinicon Club. 

Mr. Peterson was married on December 13, 1873. to Catherine M. Smith, 
a native of Denmark, and this union has resulted in the birth of three sons and 
one daughter, namely: John C. deceased; Albert, who is operating a box 
factoiy at Ottumwa, Iowa; Minnie B., living at home; James C, also living 
at home. 

AFr. Peterson has been successful in business and is deserving of a great 
deal of credit for what he has accomplished, considering the fact that he 
started in life practically empty handed and has not had the assistance of any 
one. He was one of the organizers of the .American A\'ire Cloth Companv. 



CLIXTOX COUXTV. IOWA. 853 

and he served as its president for two years, and is now secretaiw of the same. 
He is vice-president of the Land Timber Company, whose holdings are in 
Oregon, and he is president of the Chnton Timber Company, whose holdings 
are in the state of \\'ashington. 



EDWARD M. KEHOE. 

Individual enterprise, which is so justly the boast of the American peo- 
ple, is strikingly exhibited in the career of the gentleman whose name fomis 
the caption of this sketch, for he has fought his own way onward and upward 
from none too favorable environment to a i)osition of prominence in the busi- 
ness and social world of Clinton. Being a man of indomitable energy and 
unwilling to be subdued by the usual re\'erses of life, he has removed one by 
one the obstacles in his pathway and is eminently deserving of the success he 
has achieved and the popularity which is today his. 

Air. Kehoe is a nati^•e of the city of Clinton, having been born here on 
September 2, 1870, and he is the son of an excellent family, Thomas and 
Margaret (Foley) Kehoe. The father was born in 1820 in Ireland and there 
grew to maturity and was educated. He emigrated to America in 1855 and 
settled at Alexander, Virginia, where he conducted a mercantile business and 
became an influential citizen. He desired to cast his lot in a new and more 
enterprising country, and accordingly came \\'est in 18^)0 and located at Clin- 
ton, Iowa. He worked as a foreman in a grain elexator for some time and 
afterwards owned and operated a stone quarr\- in Lyons. He became well 
established here and he lived to an achanced age, dying in 1903. He was a 
member of the Catholic church and very faithful in his allegiance to the same. 
while, politically, he was a Democrat. He was a man of intelligence, broad- 
minded and of high character, and was held in high esteem for his clean prin- 
ciples and his generous impulses. Before leaving Ireland he was married to 
IMargaret Foley, who was born in 1823. and she proved to be a most faithful 
helpmeet, and was a good woman, kind and gentle to all. Her death oc- 
curred in IQ05. This union resulted in the 1)irth of seven children, three of 
whom are living, namely: John, of Omaha, Nebraska; ]\Iary E., wife of E. 
Keating, of Clinton: Edward 'SI., of this review. 

The subject received a good common school education and during his 
earlv life worked on the river and in a stone quarry. He was always a hard 
worker, and bv economv saxed his money until he had a start. In 1903 he 



854 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

piircliased the Hotel Columbia in Clinton, a popular and well managed house, 
which is neatly kept and whose service is the best. It has thirty rooms, well 
furnished, and guests here receive the utmost consideration, everything being 
done for their comfort and convenience, consequently the house is well known 
and popular with the traveling public, Mr. Kehoe being a genial, obliging and 
generous host who understands well every detail of managing a modern hotel. 
In 1905 he started the Brunswick billiard parlor and cigar store, which has 
proven to be a very popular gathering place for the young men about town 
and is very extensi\-ely patronized, as is also the Brunswick Mission billiard 
parlor and cigar store, which he opened in 1910, in Fulton, Illinois. 

Mr. Kehoe is known to the local sporting world, being vice-president of 
the local club of the Central Base Ball Association which he manages in a 
verv able and worthy manner, and he assisted in the organization of the North- 
ern Association in 1909, of which he was elected vice-president in 1910. He 
is independent in politics, preferring to vote for the best man rather than the 
party. He was reared in the Catholic faith, from which he has never de- 
parted. Fraternally he belongs to the Kniglits of Columlius and the Fraternal 
Order of Eagles. Mr. Kehoe will open a new hotel in Clinton May i, 191 1, 
to be known as The Kehoe, a European hotel, Avith hot and cold Water in 
fifty-one rooms, being located at Seventh avenue and Second street. It will 
have a restaurant and cafe in connection, also pool and l^illiard room and cigar 
stand. 



WILLIAM DURFEE EATON. 

Fossil )ly no man has l)een more closely identified with the interests of 
Lyons during the past fifty years than ^^'illiam D. Eaton, who has during that 
time l^een connected with newspaper work there, forty-nine years as proprietor 
aufl part jiroprietor of the Mirror, a record seldom equalled in length of serv- 
ice in a similar capacity. Throughout this time he has watched the changing 
fortunes of his city, has stood unswervingly for what he believed to be her 
best interests, and has always been independent in his views and actions, 
truckling to no man. Init following his best judgment. 

William Durfee Eaton was born March i, 1(834, at Colt's Station, Erie 
county, Pennsylvania, the son of Ebenezer ancl Eunice fShattuck) Eaton. 
His father was the son of Ebenezer Eaton, of English ancestry, and was born 
in New Hampshire, in March. 1800. A\'hen he Avas Init three weeks old his 
mother and father died and he was adopted by ]\lr. and Mrs. Addison, who 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 855 

had jnst lost their first born, and with them he remained nntil his marriage. 
He first attended school in New Hampshire, later in New York, the Addisons 
moving to Cattarangus county, New York, later to Jamestown, then in i'8i2 
to Colt's Station, Pennsylvania, within ten miles of Lake Erie. 

Ebenezer Eaton was married at Colt's Station to Eunice Shattuck, daugh- 
ter of Sewell Shattuck, of Scotch descent. She was born in Vermont in 1807. 
Their married life was spent near Colt's Station with the exception of two or 
three years spent in Iowa, to which state they removed in 1868, but later re- 
turned to Pennsylvania, where Mrs. Eaton died in 1872, and Mr. Eaton in 
1874. Mr. Eaton was by occupation a farmer, living seven miles from the 
village, and was a man of such a nature that he was greatly respected by those 
who knew him. In politics he was earlier a Whig, and later a Republican. 
His wife and her parents were Methodists. 

]\Ir. and Mrs. Ebenezer Eaton were the parents of eleven children, two 
of whom died in infancy. Those growing to maturity were : Elizabeth, who 
married Luther Jones, of Erie county, Pennsylvania, and died in 1851 ; 
Clarinda, w'ho married Rev. Lester Perkins, and lives in Des Moines, her hus- 
band dying in February. 1911 ; Maria, now Mrs. Conrad Ewer, and living 
in Corry, Pennsylvania; Charles A., of Erie county, Pennsylvania; W. D. ; 
Julia, widow of Ambrose Powers, living at Afton, Iowa; W'ilber, of Des 
Moines ; Matilda, married to Edward A. Nattinger at Lyons, Io\va, died at 
Ottawa, Illinois, in 1907; Perham S., of Lyons, with his brother, W. D., in 
the Mirror office. 

\\'. D. Eaton attended the common schools until sixteen, and then entered 
the office of the Erie Chronicle as apprentice. Three vears later he went to 
Cleveland, Ohio, and worked at his trade there three and one-half vears. In 
t^e fall of 18-6 he came to W'elister Citv. Iowa, remained (hiring the winter, 
then in the spring of 1857 went to Kossuth county, and pre-empted a quarter 
section of public land, remaining there three years. In the spring of i860 
Mr. Eaton went into a printing office in Des Moines, in ]\Iarch of the same 
year came to Lyons, Avorked a year and a half in the Advocate ofifice, then 
entered into partnership witli T. R. Beers in the Lyons Mirror. This partner- 
ship continued twenty-six years until ]\Ir. Beers' death in 1888, and since Mr. 
Eaton has been in charge of the paper and is now sole proprietor. This 
paper, which had been a Prohibition paper under a former editor, was changed 
by Mr. Eaton to a license paper. It is now^ a regular Republican weekly 
paper, has a wide circulation in the county, and has a reputation for voicing 
the beliefs of its editor without fear of risking the displeasure of any one. 
People speak of the Mirror as clean and straight throughout. 



856 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

A\'. D. Eaton was married in Kossuth county, Iowa, December 21, 1857, 
to X. H. Kellogg, born December 21, 1840, the daughter of Henry and 
Nancy L. Kellogg, who were originally of New York, but came from Ohio to 
Iowa. Tvlr. Kellogg was a man of versatile genius, was at one time a Univers- 
alist preacher, and at one period a druggist. His family consisted of three 
children, his two sons, Elijah, and Dr. Charles F., of Clinton, both serving 
in the Union army. To ]\Ir. and Mrs. Eaton were born three children. Enell, 
born in Kossuth county in 1858, died in Lyons in the spring of 1861 ; May, 
who was born in Lyons in i860, is now engaged at Stanley Hall Girls' School 
of Minneapolis; ^^"illiam L., who was born in i''866, died in 1880. Mrs. 
Eaton, who was a member of the Congregational church, died in 1869. 

Mr. Eaton was married a second time in May, 1873, to Mrs. Mary E. 
Buell. who was born in Lyons February 15, 1842, the daughter of Elijah and 
Mary L. Buell, her father being the first settler of Clinton county. (See 
mention of him elsewhere in this work.) One child, Edith, born in 1874, now 
employed on the regular force of the census department in Washington. D. 
C where she has been ten years, was the result of this union. l\Irs. Eaton is 
a member of the Congregational church. 

Mr. Eaton is a Republican in politics, and in his paper upholds strongly 
the policies of the party, and has not left the older doctrines to become an 
insurgent. For forty-nine years, since October i, 1861, he has been in the 
Mirror ofiice and has done much work there and does yet, being vigorous and 
hale. x\lways independent in thought and action, he has made some enemies, 
as such men will and as every man does who stands for something, but he has 
as well many friends, and even his enemies testify to his honesty and straight- 
forwardness. 



MATHIAS T. GOHLMANN. 

In the history of Clinton county, the names of certain families ap- 
pear prominently among the early settlers, and no family is better known 
among the agricultural settlers than the Gohlmanns. They have for three 
and four generations been identified with the interests of the county, and 
during that time have taken part in whatever promised to aid the develop- 
ment of the community, and have had much to do witli the establishment 
and maintenance of order and good government. Certainlv it is a heritage 
of which to be proud to l)e descended from such a family. 

]\Iathias T. Gohlmann was born in Waterford township, Clinton countv. 
Iowa, on June 18, 1858. the son of J. G. and Catherine (MuUerstedt) Gohl- 




MR. AND MRS. MATHIAS T. GOHLMANN 



-*^- 



THE W" '-mK 



III. 



K 



L 



-L^ 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 857 

mann, both natives of Germany, who in 1852 came to Scott county. Iowa, 
and after a short stav there came to W'aterford townshi]). Chnton county, 
and located on a farm of three hnnch-ed and sixty acres. To this farm J. G. 
Gohhnann later added forty acres, and in the sixties purchased the farm 
of one hun(h-ed and sixtv acres on which his son Mathias now Hves. He (hed 
near Charlotte. Iowa, on August 5. 1900. aged seventy-two; his wife fol- 
lowed him on March 11. 1903. Of their seven children, four are living. In 
politics Mr. Gohlmann was a Democrat, and lie and his family were mem- 
bers of the Lutheran church. 

The paternal grandfather of Mathias Gohlmann was Christopher Gohl- 
mann. who came from Germany to Clinton county in 1860. and bougi^t one 
hundred and sixtv acres of land for each of five children, and died in Clinton 
countv at the age of eightyrone. His wife, who was Christina Holgersen, 
died in Germany at the age of about forty. 

Mathias Gohlmann grew up on a fariu and received his education in the 
common schools. He lived on the farm in \\'aterford township until 1883. 
^^■hen he remox'ed to the farm iil Berlin township which his father had 
bought and on which he still Ii\-es. ha\'ing added to it one hundred and twenty 
acres just across the road, making two hundred and eighty acres in one bcVly. 
He is a general farmer and stock raiser, and has found agriculture \ery 
profitable. In politics he is a Republican, for several years has been assessor 
of his townshi]) and school treasurer, and for five years was county super- 
visor, all of which offices he has filled to the satisfaction of the people. His 
family are meml)ers of the Tu-angelical Lutheran church. 

Li March. 1885, Mr. Gohlmann was married to Augusta P'etersen. who 
was born in Clinton county on August 3. 1863, the daughter of John and 
Christina (^fatthias) Petersen, who came early to Clinton countv from 
Germany. To this marriage two children were horn. Christina and Au- 
gusta. Mrs. Gohlmann died on May 29, 1888, and in 1893 ^^^'- Gohlmann 
was married to Johanna Bertelsen, wdio was born in Brorup. Denmark, on 
February 19, 1868. the daughter of John and Alarie (Sailing) Bertelsen. 
wdio came to Chnton county. Iowa, in 1889. where Air. Bertelsen died in 
1897, and his widow still resides. Three children have l)een born to Mr. 
Gohlmann's second marri'ige. Catharine, Marie and Arnulf. 

^Mathias T. Gohlmann is one of the most progressive citizens of Berlin 
township, and one of the most ]M-actical farmers in the county. He has 
made a wide circle of acquaintances, and can call the most of them his 
friends. Mrs. Gohlmann's father. John C. Bertelson. was born at Hadesl'ev, 
Schleswig, Germany, and her mother in Lintrup, Schleswig, Germany. 



85S CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 

FRED BELLWOOD SHAW. 

Fred Belhvood Shaw, secretary of the American Wire Cloth Company of 
CHnton. has shown himself to be a man of excellent judgment, which accounts 
for his uniform success in factory work, and he is evidently the possessor of 
clear ideas in all business matters. Being' careful in his calculations, resource- 
ful in his dealings and eminently honorable in his relations with others, peo- 
ple have always reposed confidence in his word and his integrity has been 
above criticism. 

Mr. Shaw was born in Ontario. Canada, March 5, 1863, and he is the 
son of Richard John and Mary Jane (Belhvood) Shaw, both natives of 
Canada, the father being of Scotch descent and the mother of English an- 
cestry. Many relatives on the father's side have been officers in the British 
army, and on the mother's side many of the men were prominent merchants. 
Among the list of officers referred to some of them have held ver}^ important 
posts, includin-;' the noted Mai -Gen. Enos Shaw. 

Richard J. Shaw, the father, was a farmer by occupation and engaged in 
that line of work until his death, about 1902, his widow dying six months 
later. They were highly respected people and spent quiet lives on their farm, 
and their family consisted of three children, two of whom are living. The 
father by hard work and good management became very comfortably estab- 
lished. He ne\-er sought or held public ofifice. 

Fred B. Shaw, of this review, grew to maturity on the home farm in 
Canada and when a mere lad was put to work in his father's fields. He 
attended the common schools in his neighborhood, and, deciding to become a 
pharmacist, he entered the Toronto Pharmaceutical College, graduating with 
the class of about 1883. Owing to ill health, he did not begin work in a drug 
store, but went to California, in which state he remained some time, then re- 
turned to Iowa and started in at Cedar Rapids with the T. M. Sinclair 
Packing Compau}-, remaining with the same for a period of nearly five years, 
giving eminent satisfaction in this position. On September i, 1907, he 
became connected Avith the American Wire Cloth Company at Clinton as 
cashier, a position he held until elected secretary in 1910, which he still holds 
and the duties of which he discharges in a very able and faithful manner. 

Politically Mr. Shaw is a Republican, but he has never taken an es- 
pecial interest in public matters, preferring to give his exclusive attention 
to the business he had in hand, and this is, no doubt, very largely responsible 
for the eminent success that has always crowned his efforts. 

^Ir. Slnw was married on January 5, T904, to Mattie SlieW, a native 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 859 

of Iowa and the representative of an excellent family. She grew to maturity 
in this state and received her education here. Mr. and Airs. Shaw are the 
parents of two children, Irving B. and Clarence A. 



FRED C. AMLKE. 



That America still means "opportunity"' is evidenced in the case of Mr. 
Wilke, still a voune man, who came to this countrv with no fortune save his 
own clear brain and his inheritance of good German blood from ancestors 
who had been used to thrift and economy in situations of hardship. With 
this equipment he has, in a foreign land, raised himself to a foremost posi- 
tion among the merchants of his town, solely by his own exertions. His 
rise was gradual, but persistent, and he passed through many stages of hard 
experience. No one can foresee from the beginning the result of a life, 
but it is certainly of intense interest to look back over the events of a success- 
ful man's life and trace the development of his career, and the manner in 
which he overcomes the obstacles which rise before him. 

Fred C. AA^ilke was born in Germanv March 2^, 1866, the son of Carl 
and Johanna (Reedell) Wilke. His parents were born in Germany and his 
father was a laborer there. In 1883 father and son came to America and 
landed in Clinton, Iowa, on April 23d. Here the father died in 1905 at his 
son's home, aged seventy-eight. The mother died at sixty-seven. They were 
the parents of six children, four daughters and two sons, all li\ing. Carl 
Wilke was a hard working man and sturdy, honest citizen. 

Fred A\'ilke was educated in the German schools, and was seventeen when 
he reached this country. For four or five years he worked in a saw mill, then 
started teaming and hauling slabs and trimmings for wood. In this way he 
accumulated a little capital, and in 1893 ^^^ started in partnership with W. 
A. \\'ilke in the coal and ice business, continuing until 1900, when he bought 
out his partner and began operations alone in coal, wood and ice, and is now 
carrving on this business, at Xo. 320 Main street. His business has greatly 
increased and is now one of the largest in the city. In politics he is a Re- 
publican. He is a member of the Woodmen of the World and the Modern 
W^oodmen of America and of the Mutual Association, the German Society, 
the Mutual Life Association and of the Odd Fellows. 

Ou November 10, 1892, Mr. Wilke was married to Lena Volkman, a 
native of Iowa. To their union four children have been born, Carl, Olga, 
Fred, who died at the age of ten, and Bernice. 



86o CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

Mr. AA'ilke is a strong example of what industry and intelligence will 
accomplish when employed even in the commoner walks of life, for beginning 
as a laborer, he has won for himself a substantial competence and recognition 
amone the established Imsiness men of his citv. 



JOHN LIETZ. 



The press is one of the most important and influential elements in the life 
of any community. One of tlie strong factors in the deyelopment of fraternal 
feeling and good citizenship among the German-American residents of Clin- 
ton county has been their representation by papers of the highest devotion to 
truth and the interests of the people, in which class the loica J\ilks.c.cifini(]. the 
oldest German paper in Clinton, stands pre-eminent, while in this regard it re- 
flects the character of its publisher, Mr. Lietz. 

John Lietz was born in Germany, near Luel:>eck, on November 29, 1847, 
the son of Fred and Katharine (Lau) Lietz. Fred Lietz was a cabinetmaker 
and died in Germany in 1870. His wife died there in 1872. They were both 
highly re.^'pected for their virtues. John Lietz attended the common and poly- 
technic schools in Luebeck and learned the cabinetmaker's trade from his 
father. Seeing better opportunities in the new Avorld. he came to America in 
1867 and first located at Clinton. L)wa. He worked at his trade until 1878, 
most of the time remaining in Clinton. l)ut from 1872 to 1876 traveled consid- 
er?l)ly. l:eing for a part of the time in Chicago, for a year and more in Colo- 
rado. 

In April, 1878, Mr. Lietz Ijought an interest in the Io7i'a J^olksrjcifiing. 
his partner 1)eing a ^h\ ^XFatzen, and the firm of Matzen & Lietz conducted 
the paper until 1880, when Air. Lietz bought out his partner's share and has 
since carried on the paper alone. The J^olksccifiun/ was the first German pa.- 
per to be established in the city, is a strong Democratic organ, and has estab- 
lished a well deserved reputation for devotion to good government in the true 
interests of the people. 

Mr. Lietz is a memljer of the Odd Fellows order and in political matters 
is a faithful adherent of the Democratic party. Li 1880 he was married to 
Mrs. Helena Kirchmann, who was born in Germany and came to this country 
when young with her mother. John Lietz is highly esteemed by those who 
know him, especially by those who are descended from the sturdy German 
race. 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 86 1 

CHRISTIAN AXDRESEN. 

It is interesting to nc^te the successive gradations of some business men, 
who, apparently with much ease, surmount one obstacle after another until 
they have won the goal of their most sanguine dreams of youth, while many 
of their fellows, less able plodders on the highway of life, fall by the wayside, 
one by one, and give up the struggle. One of the successful business men of 
Clinton who has let nothing overcome his ambition and who, while advancing 
his own interests, has not lost sight of his obligations to his fellow men, is 
Christian Andresen, a nati\e of Schleswig, then a part of Denmark, Init now a 
pro\ince of Germany. He is of Danish parentage and was born on Decem- 
ber 28, 1850. His parents were Christian and Cecelia (Christisen) Andresen, 
both born in the locality mentioned above, the father on February 26, 1800, 
and the mother on October 15. 181 1. The elder Andresen was a blacksmith 
by trade, which he followed successfully in Schleswig, where he spent his 
entire life. His family consisted of one son and two daughters. Christian, of 
this review, and ]Mrs. Anna Jensen (deceased) and Mrs. Cecelia Petersen, 
who is a resident of Schleswig. 

The subject was educated in the schools of his native country and he 
learned the carpenter's trade there and followed the same successfuhy there 
for many years. Believing that he could better his condition by coming to the 
United States, he crossed the Atlantic and arrived in Clinton. Iowa, on May 
'i, 1885, having come directly to this city. He first worked for contractor 
Dunbar for some time, or until the latter went out of business, then Mr. 
Andresen worked at different. jobs on his own account. In 1908 he decided to 
abandon carpentering and building and enter the mercantile field, so, in com- 
pany with Clans Kruse, his son-in-law, he started a shoe store, which has 
grown to large proportions and they have been very successful. They carry 
an excellent and modern line of general retail shoes and do shoe repairing, this 
department being exceptionally well patronized, for very skilled workman- 
ship is turned out. A sketch of Air. Kruse appears elsewhere in this volume. 

Mr. Andresen is a member of the Lutheran church and he belongs to the 
Danish Society of Clinton, standing well in each. 

The subject was married on April 7. 1874. to Matilda Thaizsin. who 
was born in Denmark and who came to America, locating at Clinton, Iowa, 
when young. Two children have been born to them, daughters, both now 
married, namely: Mrs. Cecelia Rasmussen and Mrs. Patria Kruse, wife of 
Clans Kruse, mentioned above. 

j\Ir. Andresen owns an attracti\-e, modern and comfortal)le home at No. 



862 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

1 08 South Sixth street. Chnton. which he built in 1888 and has lived there 
ever since. He is a staid business man of quiet disposition, and he takes con- 
siderable interest in the affairs of his city and of the Danish and German in- 
habitants of the same. 



JOSEPH BORBECK. 



Herein is mentioned one of Clinton's progressive business men, a lead- 
ing lumber dealer of the city, who has again presented to us the often-seen ex- 
ample of a Gennan immigrant who by his ability and industry has attained a 
leading place among the business men of his community. The lumber busi- 
ness is one which has seiwed many people, for almost every phase of con- 
stntction is dependent on the lumber dealer for some part of its material, 
and we have as yet not devised any method of building which does entirely 
away with lumber, much as such a method may seem advisable, in view of the 
present diminishing supply of the same. But it is not legitimate use so much 
as indiscriminate waste which has been responsible for the destruction of the 
forest, and were we now able to command the losses occasioned by settlers' 
clearings, forest fires, and wasteful methods of cutting trees and of using 
Irmlier. we would not need to fear, as we now do, the extinction of our timber 
supply. 

Joseph Borbeck was born in Suedlohn, Westphalia, Germany, October 
31, 1859. the son of Henry and Elizabeth fLohberg) Borbeck. His parents 
were verv respectable people, who spent the days of their lives in Germany. 
They had a family of two children, of whom but one is living. 

Joseph Borbeck was educated in the common schools and took private 
lessons. As a youth he learned the baker's trade. In 1884 he came to 
America, expecting to find better opportunities, and located in Lyons. Iowa, 
engaged in the lumber busines, learning it by working with his uncle, Frank 
Lohberg, Sr.. and later with his cousm, Frank Lohberg, Jr. In 1897 he 
boro-ht out his cousin and went into partnershio with Mr. Ingwersen, form- 
irip' the firm o^ Ingwersen & Borbeck. He sold his interest in this in 1907. 
and was thus engaged in business bv himself at No. 801 Main street, Lvons. 
until August. 19 TO, when he formed a partnership corporation with Franz 
Lohberg and Fred Lohberg, son and grandson of his former employer. 
Thev carry a line of building material of all kinds. Their business is ex- 
tensive and is in a very prosperous condition. In politics he is independent. 
He is a member of the German Catholic church, also of the ^^^oodmen of the 
World and of various German organizations. 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 863 

Mr. Borbeck was married on April 19, 1884, to Johanna Temming. a 
native oi Gernnn}-. They are the parents of ten children: Lizetta. Enielia 
(deceased), Mary, Emma, Frank, Josephine (deceased), Henry, Agnes, 
Joseph (deceased) and Walburgis. 

Mr. Borbeck is in eveiy way an estimable citizen, is interested in all 
public affairs, and is well known and liked in the city. His efforts have met 
with well deserved success. 



CLARENCE A. FAY. 



The gentleman w-hose name heads this review is one of the successful 
newspaper publishers of the middle west, a member of the Fay Brothers, 
Incorporated. His keen business ability has con.triliuted verv nnicli to the 
success of their paper, the Clinton Daily Advertiser, and without any neglect 
of his business, he has found the opportunity to so broaden his life by travel 
that he may now be reckoned as a cosmopolitan citizen of the world, 
familiar with its appearance and its people in all parts. 

Clarence A. Fay was born in De Witt, Clinton county, Iowa, on June 
18, 1859, the son of Horace A. and Calista J. Fay. (See sketch of Louis E. 
Fay.) He received all the education obtainable in the De Witt schools, and 
then began work as a telegraph operator for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. 
Paul railroad, remained in their employ three years, and then entered the ser- 
vice of the Chicago & Northwestern, remaining with them three years, and 
serving at many stations. In 1885 he joined his brother, Louis E., as a mem- 
ber of the firm of Fay Brothers, publishers of the Clinton County Advertiser, 
and has since been a member of the firm (later an incorporation), at present 
being secretary and treasurer of the company. (For sketch of the paper see 
press chapter and sketch of Louis E. Fay.) He has always been pre-emi- 
nently a business man and attends to his own affairs strictly. He is a member 
of no lodges, and, though a Democrat, has not been strongly active in politics. 
The success of the paper in a financial way has been such as to enable him very 
liberally to gratify his tastes for travel, in which he finds his pleasure and recre- 
ation. Mr. Fay began in his own continent, has been all OAcr tlie LTnited 
States, through ^Mexico, Canada, Alaska and the West Indies, then turninsf 
his attention to Europe, has visited nearly every country of that continent, 
many of the countries several times. He has been around the world, in Asia 
has visited India, Burmah, Palestine, Arabia, China and Japan, among other 
countries, has traveled in Egypt and expects to A'isit South America next. 



864 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

During his travels he has gained a vast amount of knowledge, education and 
experience, and speaks of his travels very entertainingly. 

On June 27, 1888, Mr. Fay was married to Minnie A. Olds, a native of 
Albany, Illinois, the daughter of Walker and Susan (Parks) Olds, born 
January 21, 1866. Her father, who was a merchant at Albany, is dead, and 
her mother still resides there. Mrs. Fay is a member of the Presbyterian 
church. 

Mr. Fay lives in a handsome house at No. 337 Fourth avenue, Clinton. 
He is a gentleman of a veiy courteous manner, and shows in his bearing and 
attitude the careful man of business and the polished citizen of the world. 



FATHER J. A. MURRAY. 

The life of a pastor has its many perplexing situations and many obstacles 
in the way. More than any other profession, this requires tact, patience 
and perseverance, kindness and long suffering, and these often fail of appar- 
ent reward. Father Murray was sent into Clinton, a young and inexperi- 
enced man. under trving and peculiar conditions. For some time it seemed 
that his task would be fruitless, but his faithful persen-erance was rewarded 
and the parish of St. Patrick's today stands a living monument to a living 
man. the result of his labors. 

J. A. ]\Iurray was born in Blarney, county Cork, Ireland, on May 18, 
1864. His early education was recei\ed in the ^•illagc school, his classical 
course was taken at Mount JMelleray, and his theological studies were pur- 
sued at All Hallows College, Dublin. On June 24, 1888, he took the vows 
and was ordained as a priest, and in September of the same year crossed the 
ocean to America, and arrived at Dubuque, Iowa, where he was appointed 
assistant at the cathedral, and shortly after was appointed chancellor of the 
diocese. 

On the day after Thanksgiving, in 1889, Father Murray came to Clinton, 
ha\'ing ])een sent by the archbishop to organize the parish of St. Patrick's. 
Here he met with great opposition. The peoj)le were satisfied to be a part of 
St. Mary's parish, for which they had recently contributed largely for the 
construction of 1)uildings, and could see no need for another parish. Affairs 
looked dark indeed for the success of the young man's purpose, but at last one 
meml)er of the proposed parish agreed to loan enough money to ])urchase the 
land for clnn^ch buildings, and after this start enough money was soon pledged 




REV. J. A. MURRAY 



THE HT3^V TfOR^ 

PUBUC LIBUAUY 



R ^ 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 865 

for the ])uilding of the first church. But as soou as they were erected auother 
difficulty confronted the young man. The grounds had cost eight thousand 
dollars, the buildings ten thousand dollars ; the times were hard, the con- 
gregation poor, the lumber industry, on which many of them were depend- 
ent, was declining, and l)ut five hundred dollars had been collected. Even so, 
the Father collected among his poor parishioners money to be sent to the 
sufferers from the famine in Russia, they subcjrdinating their own necessities 
to the needs of others. The work was at all times difficult, but in ten years all 
debts were paid, and in 1905 the new St. Patrick's church, a splendid struc- 
ture, was built, as well as the rectory, at an entire cost of forty thousand 
dollars, twenty-five thousand dollars of which had been collected beforehand. 

In the early days of his pastorate in Clinton, Father Murray started the 
Mercy Hospital and Mt. St. Clare on two beautiful bluff's in the city. Both 
these institutions, like St. Patrick's parish, are enjoying the most flattering 
success. 

Father Murray has now been twenty-one years at the head of St. Pat- 
rick's parish, and during that time has made by the goodness of his char- 
acter manv friends among all denominations, and no enemies. The deeds of 
his daily life speak sufficiently well of the character and worth of the man, 
and on them let his earthly reputation rest, while the Father above will finally 
appraise them at their full ^•alue. 



CLAUS KRUSE. 



Although starting in life practically empty handed, the power of multi- 
plying his possessions with infinite tact and skill seems to have been a gift 
freely granted to Claus Kruse, a shoe merchant of Clinton, low-a, and he 
added to this ability abundant energy and devotion to his chosen work wdth 
the result that he has become very comfortably established while yet young 
in years. 

Mr. Kruse was born in Germany, on August 26, 1878, and he is the son 
of George and Catherine (Knutsen) Kruse, both still living. They came to 
America many years ago, and the father is farming in Illinois, while the 
mother makes her home in Clinton, low-a. 

Claus Kruse came to Douglas county, Illinois, with his parents in 1883, 
when about five years old. There the father bought a farm, and in 1885 the 
family moved to Clinton, Iowa, and here the subject was educated in the com- 

(55) 



866 ■ CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

men schools. After leaving school he worked at the wagonmaker's trade 
with the firm of Fish Brothers, of this city. Later he learned the shoemaker's 
trade and worked at the same for several years, becoming a very proficient 
workman. In 1907 he started in business for himself with a retail shoe store 
and repair shop at No. 102 North Fourth street. He had begun to build up 
a good trade when, six months later, his father-in-law, Christian Andresen 
(whose sketch appears on another page of this work), started in business with 
him, forming a partnership and increasing the stock, the firm being known as 
the Claus Kruse Company until January i, 191 1, when Mr. Kruse bought out 
Mr. Andresen's interest and has since conducted the business alone, and he 
continued to do a large and growing business, enjoying an excellent reputation 
throughout the vicinity. 

Mr. Kruse was married on July 19, 1899, to Patria Andresen, daughter 
of Christian Andresen. mentioned above. She was born on September 28, 
1878, and received a good education in the local schools. 

Tv\'o children ha\e been l:orn to Mr. and ]\Irs. Kruse. namely: Claudine 
and Albert. 



FRANK W. ELLIS. 



Though among the younger representatives of the legal profession at 
Clinton, Frank W. Ellis has won distinction in his conduct of litigation, and 
stands high in the estimation of the members of the Clinton county bar. The 
son of one of the ablest practitioners of the city, he inherited much of his 
father's natural aptitude for the law, but, realizing that hard work counts for 
more than talent in this profession, he applied himself steadily to its study, 
and is very thorough in his preparation of legal work. 

Frank W. Ellis was born in the city which is still his home on May 4, 
1865, the son of Lyman A. and Mary (Buckley) Ellis. His father was long 
prominent in Clinton county politics and legal affairs. Frank W. attended 
the schools of Clinton, and was graduated from the high school in 1883. He 
afterward attended the University of Minnesota, and later read law with the 
firm of Ellis & McCoy. In May, 1888, he was admitted to the bar, and prac- 
ticed until 1890. He then removed to Denver, where he continued in prac- 
tice for four years, and at the expiration of that period returned to Clinton, 
where he was for several years a member of the firm of Ellis & Ellis, since 
which time he has been a member of the prosperous and influential firm of 
Barker, Ellis & McCoy, which firm is now Ellis & McCoy, Mr. Barker having 
been elected to the bench. Mr. Ellis is a man of high mental endowments. 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 86/ 

Ambitious to excel in the things that are worth while, and of undaunted per- 
severance and determination, he has gained a recognized place in his pro- 
fession, and has a bright future. 

In May, 1899, Mr. Ellis was married to Celeste Ware, of Clinton, and 
one child. Jane, was born to them in June, 1900. In his fraternal relations 
Mr. Ellis is a ]\Iason and a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, while in politics he is a Republican, takes active part in the party 
work, and served for some years as city attorney of Clinton. During his 
practice he has laid a strong foundation in the principles of law, and is usually 
able easily to place a case which comes before him in its proper categor}-', and 
then by adequate prei)aration he becomes such a master of the (|uestions in- 
volved that he is indeed a formidable opponent to whom ever he meets and 
rightly deserves the success which he has so often won. Mr. Ellis is a man 
of much public spirit and is ever ready to lend his aid and influence to any 
measure which has the good of the community for its purpose. 



LYMAN ANDREW ELLIS. 

Lyman A. Ellis Avas one of the distinguished lawyers and statesmen of 
Iowa. There Avere few men in this community whose lives are crowned with 
greater honor and respect than is generally accorded him. Through many 
years he was an important factor in public affairs, and will leave the impress 
of his individuality for good upon the commonwealth. 

The birth of the subject occurred on a farm a few miles north of Burling- 
ton. Vermont, March 11, 1833. The family home was on the eastern shore 
of Lake Champlain and in that locality he attended the district school and at 
the age of eighteen he began teaching. In this way he was enabled to meet 
the expenses of an academic course in Bakersfield and Colchester and to pur- 
sue a course of lectures in a law school in Vermont, where, graduating, he 
was admitted to the bar, and at twenty-one years he resolved to try his fortunes 
in the west. After visiting at various places, he began the practice of law in 
Clinton county. Iowa, in 1861, where he rose almost at once into prominence 
and steadily maintained a place in the foremost ranks of the profession in the 
state. In 186;; he was elected district attorney of the seventh judicial district, 
consisting of Jackson, Scott, IMuscatine and Clinton counties. In this ofiice 
he became noted as a jury advocate and trial lawyer, and gave such general 
satisfaction that he was four times re-elected, holding the office for the period 



868 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

of sixteen years, and finally retiring in 1880. From that time until his death 
he was engaged in the general practice of law in the state and federal courts. 
The Iowa Law Reports show how extensive and successful had been his 
practice in the supreme court of Iowa. 

For a number of years Mr. Ellis was prominent as one of the leaders in 
the Republican party of Iowa. From the organization of the party he never 
faltered in his allegiance thereto, and his efforts contributed in no incon- 
siderable degree to Republican successes. His fitness for leadership and 
official honors was recognized in 1893 in his election to the office of senator 
from Clinton county, though it had previously gone Democratic by a large 
majority. During the first term he became widely known as a debator and 
renowned for his oratorical ability, winning distinction for his memorable 
speech against woman suffrage, a speech which won much admiration and 
was commented upon at length by the press of the entire state. He was a 
bold and vehement speaker, and inflexil:)le in his views as to state policies or 
what he considered a wholesome, provident legislation ; yet he never resorted 
to vituperation, ridicule or abuse of his opponents. In 1897 he refused a 
renomination as senatorial candidate because his duties at Des Moines claimed 
so much time from his professional labors; and it is a well-known fact that 
his devotion to the interests of his clients was vigilant and untiring, and gen- 
erally successful. He was a determined advocate of local option for the sake 
of control of the liquor traffic in counties where prohibition had been a failure, 
and to his persistency and leadership the modification of state-wide prohibi- 
tion and the provision for the manufacture of liquors in Iowa was largely 
due. He accepted these modifications, whose provisions, though not entirely 
satisfactory, were the best that could then be obtained. During the second 
session of the twenty-sixth General Assembly he was chairman of the judiciary 
committee, and here his knowledge of the law and general ability as a safe 
and conservative legislator proved him to be a practical worker as well as an 
orator. At the special session of 1897 ^^^ "^'^''^^ made a member of the joint 
committee for the annotation and pu1)lication of the new code, serving' as its 
vice-chairman. 

He had a nice discrimination as to legal ethics, and he was so thoroughly 
well read that he was able to base his arguments upon thorough knowledge of 
and familiarity with precedents and originality in application, and to present 
a case upon its peculiar merits, never failing to recognize the main point at 
issue, and never neglecting a thorough preparation. His pleas were char- 
acterized by logical and lucid analysis as well as ornament in metaphor and 
illustration, and his power was greater before court or jury from the fact that 
it was recognized that his aim was to secure exalted justice and not to en- 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 869 

shroud the cause in a sentimental garb, or ihusion wliicli would thwart the 
principles of right and equity involved. 

On the 1 2th of November, 1856, Mr. Ellis was united in marriage to 
Mary Buckley, and unto them were born six children : Daniel B., an attorney 
of Denver, Colorado; George B., who has large manufacturing and fruit- 
growing interests in southern California; Charles F., a business man of Los 
Angeles, California; Frank W., whose sketch appears elsewhere in this vol- 
ume; Gertrude May, wife of Garrett E. Lamb, one of the prominent business 
men and financiers of Clinton; and Lvman AL, now engaged in Ixisiness in 
southern California. 

Lyman A. Ellis departed tliis life in Ji^^ne, 1905, leaving behind him not 
only a brilliant record as statesman and lawyer, but also an enviable reputation 
as a man of unimpeachable character. He was in every sense a broad minded 
and cultured gentleman and while starting out in life with but limited oppor- 
tunities, he arose to a ])osition of prominence second to none in the history of 
the legal profession in the state of Iowa. He was survived by his wife, who 
now lives in Clinton, Iowa. 



JUDGE CHARLES WARREN CHASE. 

Of all the residents of Clinton since the foundation of the town, no one 
has left behind the memory of a stronger and more lovable character, nor has 
been more active in the duties becoming a man and a citizen than was Judge 
Chase, and certainly a history of Clinton county Avould be incomplete Avhich 
should fail to make mention of his life and achievements, the value of which 
is apparent to any one who reads of his actions. 

Charles Warren Chase was born December 8, 1834, in London, New 
Hampshire, the son of Charles W. and Lavinia (Moore) Chase. When 
Charles was very young his parents moved to Meredith, New Hampshire, and 
here he lived on his father's farm until he was sixteen, when he went to Con- 
cord, New Hampshire, and there clerked in a drug store for one year. From 
there he went to Fitchburg, ?\Iassachusetts, and for three years worked in 
James A. Lane's wholesale drug' house and learned the business. He then 
spent four years in taking a classical course at New Hampton Institute, New^ 
Hampton, New Hampshire. This enabled him to enter Dartmouth College as 
a sophomore, and he graduated from this institution in i860. Now he entered 
the law office of Col. T. J. AAHiipple at Laconia, New Hampshire, and after 
taking a three years course in two, was admitted to the bar in 1861. 

In the spring of 1862 he enlisted as a private in Company G. Twelfth 



870 CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 

New Hampshire Volunteers. On the night of his enhstment he had attended 
a war meeting, one of several which had been held, although no enlistments 
had been secured. ]\Ir. Chase was called upon for a speech and in its course 
stated his belief that the reason there had been no previous enlistments con- 
sisted in the fact that none of the wealthier men of the town had guaranteed 
to care for the families of those enlisting. In closing this his first public 
speech, he said, "To prove that I mean what I say I will now sign my own 
name." As he did so several of the wealthy men present gave the guarantee 
which he had suggested, and sixty other young men followed Mr. Chase's 
example in enlisting. By special permission of the governor, the regiment 
was allowed to choose its own officers, and the company, organized in Lake 
Village, unanimously chose Mr. Chase as captain, and presented him with a 
sword. Just before the regiment left for the front he was united in marriage 
to Susan M. Cole, of Lake Village, New Hampshire, September 20, 1862. 

Captain Chase and his company served in General Hooker's division, and 
during the siege of Fredericksburg he was seriously injured, never fully re- 
covering from the effects. When he was again able for duty he was made 
post commandant at Jeffersonville, Indiana, and, as acting colonel, had charge 
of distributing forces there and at Louisville. But his constitution was under- 
mined, and the effects of remaining on duty day and night for a week during 
Morgan's raid brought on a serious illness, which forced him to resign in 
the summer of 1864. 

Captain Chase came to Clinton, Iowa, in January, 1865, and began the 
practice of law, in which he continued even up to a few hours before his death, 
entering the office of Myron H. Terrell. He was exceedingly devoted to his 
profession, and bore the reputation of being the hardest working lawyer in 
Clinton. He was more than ordinarily careful of the interests of his clients. 
His practice covered all branches of the law, but he made more of a specialty 
of municipal and corporation law, and became an authority on such subjects. 

Much of his time was spent in the service of his city and county, in the 
advancement of whose interests he \vas always deeply interested. For nine 
years he served as a member of the school board and introduced many im- 
provements in school affairs. In 1870 he was elected clerk of the county 
court, and held this office for two terms of two years. Then he returned to 
the practice of law, and was made city solicitor for Clinton in 1878. In this 
capacity he did his first important work for the city, in revising the ordinances, 
a work accomplished through his influence and efforts, and of unceasing bene- 
fit. Later he was elected county attorney, and in 1880 was made circuit 
judge, holding this office four years. In 1888, the people of Clinton, know- 
ing of his fitness and well-tried worth, called him to the office of mayor. In 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 8/1 

this capacity he succeeded in securing- some of the greatest results accomplished 
in the way of city legislation. In his administration ordinances were passed 
governing paving conditions, and the first paving was laid in this city. The 
state laws were revised by his efforts to gain better paving service. The 
water works franchise was extended and a settlement effected during this ad- 
ministration very favorable to city interests. Better water service was ob- 
tained and the company forced to make settlement for rents and franchises 
given. Also during this term the great legal battle over the sewerage ordi- 
nances was fought. The laws affecting this as thev were re\-ised were of 
Judge Chase's own creation, and the introduction of them precipitated one of 
the fiercest legal battles ever fought in these courts. All the best leg'al talent 
was arrayed against the ordinance, l)ut it withstood the efforts of the closest 
trial. Among other ordinances provided in his term was the one governing 
permanent walks. Unflinchingly he performed his duties of enforcing the 
laws, and showed to the people of Clinton that they could be enforced, in- 
cluding the licjuor laws. It was supposed that these latter could not be en- 
forced in Clinton and not the least achievement of his administration was their 
strict application. 

For many years before his death he was recognized as Clinton's leading 
laW3'-er. From 1893 he was a member of the firm of Chase & Seaman. Al- 
ways, whether officially connected with' the city of Clinton or not, he made her 
adx'ancement and betterment his chief interest. He gained legal reputation 
in other states as well as in Iowa, but perhaps the greatest tribute to his char- 
acter as a man is the fact that he was so universally revered and trusted by all 
the citizens of Clinton, even the humblest. He died August 10, 1907. Sur- 
viving him he left his wife and four children. Charles Perr\' Chase, of the 
Iowa Engineering Company of Clinton. ]\Irs. Catherine Chase Jefferson and 
Miss Sue Cole Chase, of Clinton, and ]\Irs. \^ernie Chase Brown, of Toronto. 
Canada. One child, Xora Winifred, died in infancy. 

Xo better tribute to the memory of Judge Chase nor more fitting expres- 
sion of the virtues of his character can be s-iven than the following extracts 
from resolutions passed upon the occasion of his death bv those who from their 
long association with him Avere best equipped to know him. 

From the resolutions of the Bar Association : ''Judge Chase was, we are 
proud to sav. a man of irreproachable integrity, of stainless reputation, and 
in his hv and professional life the mirror of honor. 

'"AMien we have recorded these sentiments we lia\e said as much as 
volumes could speak, and yet we desire to express our further appreciation of 
his abilities. In corporation law. in proljate law. and in many other specialties 
and branches of the law. he was a keen, patient, painstaking worker, whose 



872 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

solution of a legal problem was sound and comprehensive. As a lawyer his 
judgment was reliable, as a court of equity his conclusions were just, and as 
an official his acts were satisfactory, faithful and beneficial. This is high 
praise, but deserved, and perhaps sufficient, but yet, again we linger to admire 
the scope of his modesty, and with it the strength of his will, an unition of two 
forces which hews to the goal of success. 

"Upon the tablets of our memories he has left many other evidences of 
his high attainments, cogent among which were his unswerving kindness and 
consideration for others at all times, his capability to make and cement strong 
friendships, and that great capacity to make himself a tower of strength 
among his brethren of the bar and in the community which he adorned." 

From the resolutions of the directors of the City National Bank : "Judge 
Chase was a rare character. Without ostentation, but with a quiet, pains- 
taking industry, he capably and faithfully filled the many positions of honor 
and trust that came to him, most often unsought. As an attorney, as clerk 
of the courts, as a judge on the bench, as the mayor of the city — in each posi- 
tion he made a record for ability and fidelity that was highly honorable. 

"As a soldier — captain in a New Hampshire regiment in the Civil war — 
it was said of him by a prominent attorney of Nebraska, who was a private 
under his command, 'He was the sandiest man that ever stood on a battle- 
field.' Yet no man e\-er knew from his lips that he had ever stood where 
'war's (lire carnage raged.' 

"He left a good name, which is worth more than great Wealth. All who 
knew him believed in him ; all trusted him ; best of all, all loved him. We, 
who have been associated with him, will miss him and his counsel. 

"Though he has passed from our sight, he is still held in loving remem- 
brance, and the influence of such a life will live on, a vitalizing force for the 
world's betterment." 



NICHOLAS FRED WULF. 

The subject of this sketch belongs to the large foreign element wliich con- 
stitute such an important part of Clinton county's populace, and to which the 
country is so greatly indebted for the material prosperity of recent vears 
which has characterized the growth and advancement of this county. Indus- 
trious, energetic and intellig'ent, he has borne his share in the development of 
the section of the country in which he lixes, and though l)ut tew years a citizen 
of the United States, he is as truly American in his ideas and tendencies as if 
he had l)een l)orn on American soil. 







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MR. AND MRS. NICHOLAS F. WULF 



TUr. NEW iy)RK 

Pl.'lUJC T,IB..ARY 



A8 . T.K^'Ol, AND 

mtin-N I'OJNUATIONS 

R L 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 8/3 

Nicholas Fred Wnlf was born in Germany January 3, 1867, being one 
of seven children whose parents were Christian and Marguerite (Rehse) 
Wulf. Christian ^^^^lf. a brick and stone mason l)y trade, spent his entire 
life in the fatherland and died near the place of his birth in the year 1870. 
Later his widow came to the United States and located at Grand Mound. 
Iowa, where she has since made her home. Six of the seven children of 
Christian and Marguerite Wulf are living, two of whom are still in Germany, 
the others residing in different parts of the United States. 

Nicholas Fred Wulf enjoyed the advantages of a common school educa- 
tion in his native land and while still a youth he began supporting himself as 
a farm laborer. Having heard and read much of America and the opportuni- 
ties which it aft'orded young men to better their condition, he bade farewell 
to home and friends in 1885 and in due time arrived at his destination in this 
country, making his way direct to Grand Mound, Iowa, where for some time 
he turned his hands to any kind of honest labor he could find. After working 
in this way for a couple of years, he rented land and gave his attention to 
agriculture. He continued tilling the soil for a share of the proceeds until 
1909, when he bought a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Berlin town- 
ship, since which time he has conducted his labors upon a more extensive scale 
and forged rapidly to the front among the leading agriculturists of his part of 
the county. In connection with general farming, he feeds considerable live 
stock and from the two sources is the recipient of an income which, judging 
b}- what he has already accomplished, will ere long place him in easy circum- 
stances. 

The political affiliations of Mr. Wulf are with the Repuljlican party and, 
though never allowing himself to become excited over pul)lic aft'airs, he aims 
to keep in touch with his party and familiar with the leading issues of the 
times. He is an excellent farmer, an intelligent and enterprising citizen and 
in every relation of life he enjoys the confidence of those with whom he 
mingles and stands high in the esteem of the public. Like the majority of 
his countrymen, he was reared a Lutheran and still holds to the doctrine of 
that church, being a zealous worker in the local society which he attends and 
a liberal contributor to its support. 

On February 19, 1896, Mr. Wulf and Lena Correll. daughter of Abram 
Correll. mentioned elsewhere in these pages, were united in the holy bonds of 
matrimony, the union being blessed with three children, namely : Glenn Galen, 
Eula Fern and Beryl Otho. 

Thus in a rather cursor}- manner lias been set forth the leading facts and 
characteristics in the life of. one of Clinton county's representative farmers and 



8/4 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA, 

intelligent citizens. In the most liberal meaning of the term, he is a self made 
man. his rise from the humble position of a day laborer to his present condition 
among the successful agriculturists of his township, and that. too. in a com- 
paratively short time, being due entirely to his own efforts. 



PAUL D. AND CLAUDE D. HART. 

The Hart family has long been one of the best known and most highly 
respected in Clinton county and its several members have played varied and 
conspicuous roles in the drama of civilization here for many decades, being 
prominent in business, civic and social life, and two of the best known mem- 
bers of this house are Paul D. and Claude D. 

The former was born March 6. 1880. in the city of Clinton, and he is 
the son of Paul S. and Elizabeth (Martin) Hart. The father, a man of 
many sterling characteristics, was born near Montreal, Canada, in March, 
1832. He grew up in his native land and was educated, starting out in life 
for himself at an early age and making a successful business man, devoting 
the major part of his active life to the lumber business. His death occurred 
in 1883. having spent his last years in Clinton, Iowa, to which city he emi- 
grated in 1872 and was soon well established here. He was a worthy member 
of the Episcopal church, and politically he was a Democrat. He married 
Elizabeth Martin, of Belle River. Canada, in 1861. She was bom in 1845, 
and her death occurred in March, 1902. To this union eleven children were 
born. 

Paul D. Hart was reared and educated in Clinton, receiving an excellent 
text-book training, having applied himself very carefully to his studies. For 
some time he worked at the cab and livery business, and in 1899 he and his 
brother, Claude D., formed a partnership and started the firm of Hart Broth- 
ers Liver}' and Cab Line, which they have continued with signal and ever- 
growing success, being well equipped in every respect for the large business 
which they are carrying on. They have a prestige second to none in this line 
throughout this locality and their firm is popular with the traveling and gen- 
eral public. 

Paul D. Hart is an Episcopalian and a Democrat in politics. He was 
married on March 26, 1906. to Clarita DeBeltrand. who was born in Michigan 
in September, 1889, the daughter of an excellent family, and this union has 
resulted in the birth of one child, Jean Daniel. 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 875 

Claude D. Hart was born February 6, 1872, in LaPorte, Indiana, and he 
is the son of Paul S. and Eli;cal)eth ( Alartin) Hart, mentioned above, and the 
brother of Paul D. Hart, his partner in business. He was only one month 
old when his parents brought him to Clinton. Iowa, and here he grew to ma- 
turity and was educated, receiving excellent training in the local schools. 
Being an ambitious hd and anxious to start in the lousiness world for him- 
self, he began working in a saw-mill at the age of eleven years. When eigh- 
teen he began work as a passenger brakeman, which he continued for a period 
of ten years, being regarded by the railroad company as one of their most 
trusted and faithful employes. Then he entered into partnership with his 
brother, Paul D., as mentioned above, and has continued in the livery and 
cab business to the present time. 

Claude D. Hart is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, and 
of the Episcopal church; politically he is a Democrat. He was married on 
November 24. 1895, ^^ Mary Adler, of Clinton, who was born on June 2, 1872, 
her family being well known here. This union has been ^vithout issue. 



PHINEAS STEWART TOWLE. 

That life is the most useful and desirable that results in the greatest good 
to the greatest number and, although all do not reach the heights to which they 
aspire, yet in some measure each can win success and make life a blessing to 
his fellowmen ; and it is not necessary for one to occupy eminent public posi- 
tions to do so. for in tlic Inimbler walks of life there remains much good 
to be accompHshed and many opportunities for one to exercise talents and 
influence which will in some Avay touch the li\-es of those with whom we come 
in contact, making them better and brighter. One of the conspicuous figures 
in the lousiness and social life of Clinton county of a past generation who 
seized every opportunity to improve not only his own condition but also that 
of his neighbors, thereby making life more sunny for himself, his family and 
his fellow men, was Phineas Stewart Towle, founder and builder of the large 
and well known mercantile firm bearing this name, and who after a well-spent 
and honorable career, is now sleeping the sleep of the just. 

Mr. Towle was born in Bath, Steuben county. New York, of a sterling 
okl familv of the Empire state, on June 8, 1836. He was the son of Jona- 
than, wh(^ was the son of Thomas, Ijorn in 1770, in New Hampshire, his fam- 
ilv figuring in the earlv history of that state. He was educated in the old- 
time schools of his native community and grew to maturity in the parental 



876 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

liome. He had an amljition to lie a merchant from early youth and he accord- 
ingly lent every effort in that direction, heginning as a clerk in a dry goods 
store at Olean, Xe\y York. Like many of the young men of the New Eng- 
land states in the fifties and sixties, Mr. To\yle emigrated to the West and 
made his subse(juent home here, locating in Clinton, To\ya. in 1866. He \yas 
soon established in the dry goods business on First street and was successful 
from the start, gradually building up a large and popular establishment by his 
fair, straightfor\yard dealing and his judicial and careful management, thus 
la}ing the foundation for the present extensive firm of Towle & Spreter Com- 
pany. He always kept a clean, carefully selected and up-to-date stock of goods 
and was obliging and courteous to the trade, his customers becoming his 
friends as a rule. By nature and by training he became one of the most suc- 
cessful merchants of this part of the state and was universally recognized as 
one of Clinton count}-"s most progressi^•e and representative citizens. 

Mr. Towle was married to Mary Brother, the representative of an excel- 
lent old family of Bath, Steuben county. New York, where her birth occurred 
on November 21, 1839. They were married on December 12, 1867, at the old 
home and this union proved to be a mutually happy and fortunate one. It was 
blessed by the birth of three children, namely : Henry Stewart, of Clinton, 
Iowa: Charles Brother, of Lincoln, Nebraska; and Stewart AY of Clinton. 

Mr. Towle Avas prominent in the Masonic fraternity and also the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen, having attained the thirty-second degree in the 
former and he was grand master of the state in the latter. His influence was 
wide and veiy marked in these old and honored orders, and his daily life in- 
dicated that he endeavored to live up to their sublime precepts. 

The death of this excellent citizen and valued friend of a vast host of 
acquaintances occurred on July 18, 1898, in Elmira, New York, while on a 
visit to that city. He was a man whom to know was to respect and admire, 
for he was an upright, kind-hearted gentleman of fine address, and his life is 
worthy of emulation. 



WILLIAM H. CARROLL. 

"Through struggle to triumph'' seems to be the maxim which holds sway 
for the majority of our citizens, and. though it is undoubtedly true that many 
fall exhausted in the conflict, a few, by their inherent force of character and 
strong mentality, rise above their environment and all which seems to hinder 
them, until thcv reach the i)lane of pfiluence toward which their faces were set 
through the long years of struggle that must necessarily precede any accom- 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 877 

plishment of great magnitude. Such has been the history of \\'ilham H. Car- 
roll, one of the most popular attorneys of Clinton county and one of her most 
public spirited and honored citizens. 

Mr. Carroll was born in Scott county, Iowa, April i6, 1869. He is the 
son of James and Alice (O'Brian) Carroll. The father was for a number of 
years a prosperous farmer in Scott county, where he was well known and in- 
fiuential. He is now living retired in the city of Clinton and is high!}' re- 
spected by a wide circle of friends and accjuaintances. His wife passed to her 
rest on October 17, 1870. William H. Carroll grew up on a farm in Scott 
county and attended the rural schools, and he was graduated from the Dixon 
Normal School in 1888, receiving an excellent education. He began teaching 
in Scott county, also continued to teach after coming to Clinton county, having 
been principal at Grand Mound for a period of one year, giving the greatest 
satisfaction to both pupil and patron, being both an instructor and an enter- 
tainer in the school room. Had he continued teaching he would doubtless have 
become long ere this one of the notal)le educators of the state, 1)ut believing 
that the legal field held especial inducements for him, he entered the law de- 
partment of the State University of Iowa in 1892, where he made a splendid 
record and from which institution he was graduated in 1894. He soon after- 
ward entered the law office of his brother, A. E. Carroll, in Clinton, and 
has remained in the same office until the present time, hi\-ing enio\'ed a 
very satisfactory practice from the first and a constantly growing clientele. 
He has figured prominently in the local courts and is known to be a most care- 
ful, painstaking and deliberate attorney, always guarded in his expressions 
and cautious in arriving" at conclusions, persistent and indefatigable in his re- 
search and profoundly versed in the basic principles of jurisprudence and well 
informed on the latest decisions of courts. As a trial lawyer he has few 
equals and no superiors, and he is always a very busy man, his ser\ices being 
in great demand at all times. Owing to his ability and his interest in public 
matters, he was soon singled out for offices of trust and for the past six years 
he has filled to his own credit and to the satisfaction of all concerned the office 
of assistant county attorney. He is president of the Da\enport Abstract Com- 
pany, and he is a director in the Guaranty Life Insurance Company of Daven- 
port. Fraternallv Mr. Carroll belongs to the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, the Knights of Columbus, being a charter member of the latter 
and is past grand knight. He is also a member of Sheridan Clul>. The 
well known law firm of which he is a meml)er has offices both in Clinton and 
Davennort. and is composed of \\'illiam H., A. E. and E. J. Carroll. 

William H. Carroll was married on April 19. 1899, to Elizabeth V. Streib, 
a lady of culture and refinement, a resident and native of Clinton. Six children 



878 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

have blessed this union, named as follows : Vincent, Raymond, Alice, Marian, 
Elizaljeth and \\'. Herl^ert. They are all, with their parents, constituting a 
mutually happy home circle. 



CHARLES F. ALDEN. 

Charles F. Alden was born in Augusta, Maine, in July, 1849, ^ lineal 
descendant of John Alder;. He grew to manhood in Maine, and in 1870 came 
to Clinton, Iowa, and engaged in th.e dry goods business, as a partner in the 
firm of W'hitehouse 8z Alden, which continued for twelve years. They were 
successful. Upon the dissolution of this firm Air. Alden engaged in the coal 
business. For some time he has held the responsible position of vice-president 
of the People's Trust and Savings Bank. 

Mr. Alden was married in 1883 to Harriet Lamb, the daughter of Charles 
Lamb, of Indiana. Fraternally he is a member of the Masons, having taken 
the work of the Scottish Rite and lower lodges, up to the thirty-second degree, 
and is one of the Clinton lodge of Elks. In politics he is independent, voting 
for men rnd measures, not for a party ticket. 



THE CLINTON SUGAR REFINING COMPANY. 

Among the various manufacturing industries which have been incident 
to the recent upl)uilding of the city of Clinton and which have brought her 
into wide-spread prominence, especially in industrial circles, the Clinton Sugar 
Refining Company stands as one of the most extensive and important, al- 
though as one of the newest, but it has been a great success from the first and 
thus far the financial wisdom of its establishment has been proven and from 
time to time extensions hive been pronuilgated of promising character, giving 
tangible shape to a combination of enterprise, sound business judgment and 
well directed energy. Its present position of importance in the lousiness and 
commercial world has been attained almost by one colossal stride. 

This concern was organized in 1906 and has been in operation since 1907, 
employing over three hundred men, and it is a splendid example of that rapid 
upbuilding which has characterized the Middle West. The officers of the 
National Canning Company were the real organizers, their purpose being to 
furnish one of the chief users of glucose with the supplies necessary to their 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA, 879 

business. With this object in view, a corporation was officered on June 5, 
1906, with a capitalization of one million and one hundred thousand dollars, 
five hundred thousand being preferred stock and six hundred thousand com- 
mon stock. The following officers and directors were elected : O. H. Peckham, 
of St. Louis, president ; V. L. Price, of St. Louis, vice-president ; A. J. Walter, 
of St. Louis, secretary; F. D. Seward, of St. Louis, treasurer; A. H. Kers- 
ting, of Clinton, general manager; F. E. Peckham, of Clinton, assistant secre- 
tary-treasurer; Frank A. Manning, of Louisville, Kentucky; Frank F. Reed, of 
Chicago, and A. W. Paris, of Minneapolis, Minnesota. All these names are 
well known to industrial circles of the Mississippi valley, and it is not strange 
that they should promote and develop in a short time a great enterprise like 
that in question. 

With this organization behind the movement, a tract of seventeen acres 
was purchased below Harrison street, between the Chicago & Northwestern 
tracks and the ^Mississippi river, at Clinton, Iowa, an ideal site for factory 
purposes, and ground was iM'oken on Juh' 25th, following, the actual construc- 
tion of the mammoth plant being begun soon afterwards. In the month of 
April, 1907, the large buildings were completed, being models of convenience, 
utility and stability, modern, sanitary, commodious and in ever)- way suited to 
the purposes desired. The manufacturing facilities of the plant correspond 
with the buildings, being equipped with special machinery of tlie most up-to- 
date patterns, selected and designed to give the most minute accuracy of me- 
chanical detail, no expense or pains being spared to combine endurance with 
a mechanism that would bring the high-grade results demanded. 

After the completion of the buildings and the installation of the machin- 
ery, operations were begun at once, and since April, 1907, the Clinton Sugar 
Refining Company has attained and held a prominent and secure place among 
the leading manufacturing industries of eastern Iowa. The natural location 
of the plant has given its owners a decided advantage. Clinton is the center of 
four of the great corn belt railroads, through which channels abundant sup- 
plies are drawn ; these roads are the Chicago & Northwestern, the Chicago & 
St. Paul, the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, and the Chicago, Rock Island & 
Pacific Railroad Companies. The land belonging to this company is washed 
by the waters of the great Mississippi, and from this stream the entire water 
supply is obtained, about two and one-half million gallons daily being filtered 
for use in the manufacture of glucose; and additional transportation facilities 
are also furnished by the river. In addition to these natural advantages, the 
company, as already intimated, has in use the latest improved machinery, its 
electric power being generated from a turbine plant installed in December, 
1909, and water is filtered 1)y the latest approved methods. A fire department. 



, 88o CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

consisting of trained employes, has been organized for emergency cases. A 
cooper shop for making its own barrels is a distinct feature of the plant. 

The chief products of the Clinton Sugar Refining Company are glucose, 
starch and grape sugar ; the by-products are corn oil, corn oil cakes and gluten 
feed, all of which are made from raw material, corn. The business of this 
company is rapidly growing, large shipments now being made to all parts of 
the United States, and a very encouraging export trade has been begun. 

Only two of the officers of this company reside in Clinton, A. H. Kerst- 
ing, the general manager, and F. E. Peckham, the assistant secretary-treasurer. 
The main offices are in St. Louis, and the Clinton plant is but one of some eigh- 
teen or twenty scattered throughout the West. 



HANS ANDERSON. 



Denmark is a small nation and has sent few immigrants to this country, 
but those whom she has sent are of the mold from which men are made. Not 
being large or powerful enough to engage in the struggle for empire which 
is characteristic of the larger European nations, this small one is not burdened 
with a large navy and army and has correspondingly more time to devote to 
the peaceful arts, and can present to the rest of the world a body of citizens 
unexcelled in character by a like number from any nation. Her school system 
is among the best in the world, and there is a smaller per cent of illiterate 
persons among her inhabitants than among any other. Perhaps it would be 
well for some of the larger nations to follow her example and develop the 
peaceful arts in opposition to so much preparation for aggressive warfare. 

Hans Anderson was born in Denmark, July 5, 1850, son of Andrew and 
Christine Anderson, who were natives of the country and spent their lives 
there. Andrew was a weaver by trade and the father of two sons and two 
daughters. Hans Anderson attended the common schools of Denmark and in 
1872 came to this country, landing at Low Moor on May 14th, and has since 
made Clinton his home. He has always farmed, having been reared in Den- 
mark as a farmer. In the spring of 1902 he purchased the farm of one hun- 
dred and forty acres, where he now lives, fertile land, which he has improved 
by erecting excellent buildings. He has followed general farming and stock 
raising, has been a good manager and has found his work pleasant. 

Mr. Anderson was married in 1872 to Mary Nelson, who has borne to him 
the following children, all living : John, Anna, David and Fred. Mr. Ander- 
son and his wife are Lutherans and his children have been reared in that faith. 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 88 1 

He is a Democrat and, while not an aspirant to office, his neighbors have such 
confidence in liini that they elected him township trustee. He is a man whose 
life speaks for its true worth in his daily actions, and there his neighbors find 
it recorded and bear testimon}' to his nobility and integrity. 



OTTO KORN. 



Realizing the fact that success comes, sometimes belated, but eventually 
to the deserving. Otto Korn, well known and popular baker of Clinton, Iowa, 
early in life began to shape his course to a goal that would mean financial 
ease in later life and the establishment of an unblemished reputation among 
his fellow men, and though yet a young man he has made rapid strides in that 
direction. 

Mr. Korn was born in Davenport, low^a, ]^Iarch 24, 1879, and he is the 
son of Henry and Elizabeth (Allheit) Korn, both natives of Germany, the 
father born in 1838 and the mother in 1840. Henry Korn grew^ to maturity 
in the fatherland and w^as educated there, learning the baker's trade, which 
he continued to follow after coming to America, having emigrated to Daven- 
port, Iowa, when a young man. That he was an expert in his chosen line is 
partly evidenced from the fact that during the Civil war he w-as a baker in 
the commiss'ir}- department of the Union armv. After the close of the war 
he started a bakery of his own in Davenport, Iowa, wdiere he is still engaged 
in business, his bakeiT being perhaps the best in Davenport and which has 
been popular and well patronized for upwards of forty years. His wdfe is 
also still living. Otto Korn, of this review, is the youngest of a family of 
seven children, named as follows : William, Charles, Harry, Lena, John, 
Bertha and the subject. 

The father and his five sons are all bakers and they own and conduct 
five prosperous bakeries in their respective cities and they are all very ex- 
tensively patronized and are regarded as the best in eastern Iowa and Illinois 
in every respect, being sanitary, kept scrupulously clean, equipped with the 
latest and most approved machinery and necessary appliances, and a very 
extensive outside trade is also enjoyed by each. Only the best of material 
is used, and none but proficient and high class employes are to be found in 
any of their plants. 

Otto Korn, the immediate subject of this review, received his education 
in the schools of Davenport and from the time that he was a small boy he 

(56) 



882 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

worked in his father's bakery, in fact, grew up in the business, and when yet 
a young man had mastered its numerous details, learning the business "from 
the bottom." He worked at home with his father until 1907, when he moved 
to Clinton and started a bakery of his own at No. 230 Fifth avenue. It was 
not long until he was doing a big business, for the people of this city liked 
his goods and his trade has grown wonderfully. In 19 10 he purchased a lot 
back of his store and erected a modern, \vell equipped and model bakery, for 
the old bake-shop could not handle the trade. He has also a very large ship- 
ping business over Iowa and Illinois. 

Mr. Korn is a Mason in his fraternal relations, being a member of the 
DeMolay Consistory of Clinton. He also belongs to the Turner society. 

Mr. Korn was married on April 14, 1906, to Amanda Flindt, who was 
born and reared in Davenport and attended school there, being the daughter 
of a highly respected family there. This union has been without issue. 



WILLIAM MacQUIGG. 

In giving the life record of Dr. William MacOuigg, whose name for 
many decades was a household word in Clinton county, Iowa, the publishers 
of this work believe that it will be an incentive to the young who may peruse 
it to lead nobler lives, have higher ambitions and accomplish more for their 
fellow men, for his life was always led along a plane of high endeavor, al- 
ways consistent with the truth in its higher forms and ever in keeping with 
honorable principles Besides being n physician and surgeon of widespread 
reputation and great skill and ability, he was a public spirited citizen and his 
influence in the general progress of this county was potent and salutary. He 
was the scion of ])ioneer ancestors of the most sterling qualities who did 
much in their day for the communities in which they lived, and Dr. MacOuigg 
was a worthy descendant of his forbear, thus for many reasons, not the least 
of which is the fact that he was one of the patriotic sons of the North, who, 
when the tocsin of war sounded, left his hearthstone and business to do what 
he could in saving the countr}'- from treason, he is gladly given conspicuous 
representation in this work. 

The Doctor w^as born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 14, 1831, and 
he was the son of James and Margaret (Dunlap) MacOuigg. They were both 
born in Scotland, and in a very early day they left the land of thistle and blue- 
bell and crossed the broad Atlantic in an old-fashioned sailing-vessel, and 
located in Philadelphia. They were young people when they left their native 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 883 

heath and were not married until after the\- had located in the City of 
Brotherly Love. James MacOuigg" was an architect, which calling he fol- 
lowed successfully for many years, in fact, devoted the major part of his life 
to this calling and was a very skilled workman and a good business man. He 
spent his life in Philadelphia and died there, giving his attention exclusi\-ely 
to his work and to his family, never aspiring to be a public man, always pre- 
ferring- a quiet retired life. He was a man of upright principles and enjoyed 
the confidence and esteem of a wide circle of friends, as did also Mrs. Mac- 
Quigg, a woman of fine attributes. They were the parents of six children, 
five of whom are living. 

Dr. William MacQuigg received a good common school education in his 
native city and early in life decided to take up the medical profession and 
began pre])arations for the same, graduating in i860 from the Cle\'eland 
(Ohio) Medical College, where he made an excellent record. Coming west to 
Iowa, then a frontier state, he located at the town of Camanche, in 1852. and 
when he completed his medical education he returned there and remained until 
1866, when he mo\ed to Lyons, Clinton county, this state, and remained here 
up to the time of his death, having enjoyed a very liberal patronage from the 
first. For over fifty years he ranked with the leading ])hysicians of north- 
eastern Iowa, standing high in a community noted for the high order of its 
professional talent. He always kept abreast of the times in all matters per- 
taining to his calling, and was deeply versed in the same. Always a student, 
he familiarized himself with the world's best literature, and, possessing an 
excellent memory, he was one of the county's best historians, and it was in- 
deed interesting to hear him recall incidents of the early days when this coun- 
try was new, whose development he lived to see and take a prominent part in. 
He was the oldest practicing" physician in Clinton county at the time of his 
death. 

Doctor MacOuigg proved his patriotism in 1862 by enlisting in the 
Twenty-sixth Iowa Volunteer Infantry as surgeon and in this capacity served 
very creditably for one year, when he was discharged on account of sickness. 
After the war he returned to Canianche, and in 1866 located permanently in 
Lyons, now a suburb of Clinton. In politics he was a Republican, and a 
member of the Unitarian church. Fraternally the Doctor belonged to Lodge 
No. 93, Masonic order, also the Consistoiy. He was formerly a member of 
the Clinton County Medical Society, but retired several years ago. 

Doctor MacOuigg married, on February 24, 1885, Hannah Altman, a 
native of Pennsylvania, a ladv of culture, who has a host of friends here.. 



884 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

HORATIO RUSSELL DEXTER. 

Among the residents of Clinton who have been long identified with the 
citv and have watched and aided in its development for many years is Horatio 
Russell Dexter, who since early youth has lived in the city, and during his 
manhood has been an active participant in its affairs, being now ranked 
among its leading business men. He was born in Oswego county, New York, 
on May 21, 1853, the son of Parker and Mary Ann (Mason) Dexter. 

Parker Dexter was born in 181 6, in Oswego county, New York. He 
was a pattern maker and millwright by trade, and a master of these occupa- 
tions, being expert in both lines. In 1859 he came to Clinton county, Iowa, 
and followed his trade for some time. Later he organized a cigar box fac- 
tory, for which there were then many facilities in Clinton, on account of the 
many saw mills and the readiness and cheapness \vith which the culled lum- 
ber from the mills, suitable for this work, could be obtained. In this busi- 
ness he prospered, but finally his factory was destroyed by fire and he retired 
from active pursuits, and died in 1890. In politics he was a Republican, and 
for some years held the office of city marshal, the duties of which he dis- 
charged in a manner which reflected credit upon himself and satisfied the 
citizens of the city. Parker Dexter was a man well known in the city, had 
many friends, and wielded considerable influence in local affairs. 

Horatio Russell Dexter received his education in Clinton, where he grew 
to manhood. He early began work in Lamb's sawmills as saw filer, and later 
was promoted to the management of the planing mill of the C. Lamb & Sons 
Company, thus gaining his apprenticeship in life in the same establishment 
with many of Clinton's present prominent citizens. In 1888 he entered the 
service of the Chicago & Northwestern railroad as a brakeman, and continued 
in that capacity for nearly fifteen years. In 1902 he started in business at 
No. 902 South Fourth street, and has since prospered. In 191 1 he purchased 
the three-story building, Xo. 920 Fourth street, where he conducts his cigar 
business and has fitted up the second and third stories for an up-to-date room- 
ing house, which is modern in e\erv respect. He always keeps on hand a 
full stock of fine and up-to-date goods, and his fixtures are substantial and of 
approved modern pattern, while his satisfied customers are at once his best 
advertisement and the best evidence of his success. Fraternally he is a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Pythias, and in his daily life exemplified the teachings 
of that order. In politics he is a Republican, and in religious affiliations a 
Methodist. For two years he was chief of Clinton's excellent volunteer fire 
department, and is a member of the A. H. Smith Hose Team, which held the 
state championship of Iowa for two years. 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 885 

Mr. Dexter was married in Octol;er, igoo. to Lucy Tlionias. a nati\-e of 
Clinton, who was born in 1863. Two children have been born to him, 
Chancy A., now in Chicago, and Sarah Allen, in school. As a keen business 
man, a social companion of high order, and a citizen who takes much interest 
in the good of the community, Mr. Dexter ranks high among the residents of 
Clinton. 



FLOYD L. SUNDERLIN. 

No person in this country today exercises such influence as is wielded 
by the editor of a newspaper, therefore it is of the utmost importance to the 
welfare of the countr}- that these men shall be men of intelligence and incor- 
ruptible honesty, for they are in the truest sense leaders of the public. Were 
all the newspaper editors men of the type of Floyd L. Sunderlin, the interests 
of the public would be most zealously guarded and the leadership would be 
in trusted hands. 

Floyd L. Sunderlin. the editor and publisher of the Delmar Journal and 
of the Maquoketa Record, was born in Sunderlinville, Potter county, Penn- 
sylvania, on November 30, 1857, the son of Samuel and Laura A. (Barney) 
Sunderlin. His mother, now deceased, was a lady of superior intellect, of 
wide reading and of excellent literary ability. She was the author of two 
volumes, "Pencilings from Lnmortality" and the ''Lyric of Life." She was 
the mother of three children, a son, Floyd L., and two daughters, Mrs. C. B. 
Jones, of Ames, Iowa, and Mrs. A. L. Pulver, of Moline. Illinois. 

Floyd Sunderlin came west with his parents in 1863, received a common 
school education, and then took up the study of law and was admitted to the 
bar in 1879. In 1887 he entered the field of journalism, for which he seems 
especially fitted, by establishing the Delmar Journal. Having prospered in 
this venture, he, in February, 1906, purchased the Maquoketa Record, and 
now edits and publishes both papers. He is a clear and forcible writer and 
fearlessly advocates the principles of right and justice, never hesitating to 
strike wrong a blow. Both his papers have a large and constantly increasing 
circulation and a reputation in keeping with the character of their editor. 

In 1884 Mr. Sunderlin was married to Stella Barter, of Calamus, Iowa. 
To this union one son was born, Ray Sunderlin, now of Cripple Creek, Colo- 
rado. The mother died in 1885. In 1892 Mr. Sunderlin married Mae 
Scott, of Delmar, Iowa, who has borne him four children : Howard, Gertrude, 
Olive and Edith, bright and interesting young folks. Mr. Sunderlin is an 
active member of the Masonic lodge at Delmar, has filled many of the offices, 



886 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

and in his life exemplifies the noble principles of the order. Editor Simderlin 
is a man in whom the people have peculiar confidence, because of his square 
and uncompromising stand in the face of whatever does not agree with his 
conceptions of honesty and equity. Well-known in the communities in which 
his papers circulate, he is a citizen whom they could ill afford to lose. . 



GEORGE E. WILSON. 

Among the honored and influential citizens of Clinton, Iowa, is George 
E. W'ilson, who has shown what an earnest, energetic and hardworking man 
can accomplish, although forced to hew his own fortune from obstacles that 
beset his way. He started life without financial aid from anybody; has been 
industrious, and has adhered to those principles and ideals that always insure 
success, so that his twilight years are being passed in the midst of plentv and 
serenity. 

]\Ir. Wilson is an American by adoption only, being by birth one of our 
esteemed English cousins. He was born in England, March i8, 1847, the son 
of George and Eliza (Roberts) Wilson. His mother died in England, after 
which his father brought the family to the United States in the year 1856, 
settling near Rockford, Illinois, where he became well established and prom- 
inent. He was a man of sterling characteristics and was highh^ respected. 
He met death in a railroad accident near Rockford in 1892. 

George E. Wilson, the subject of this review, was reared on a farm, where 
he remained until about seventeen years of age. In his youth he also worked 
in a reaper factory and a flour mill, and later learned the foundry and machine 
business. He spent the period after the war in Louisiana and Alabama, and 
shortly thereafter went to Beloit. A\'isconsin, where he was with the ]\Ierrill 
& Houston Manufacturing Company for two years. Later he located in 
Sterling, Illinois, where he was engaged in the foundry and machine business 
for several years. In 1892 he purchased the Clinton Bridge & Iron Works, at 
Clinton, Iowa. This company is one of the leading concerns of the state and 
is too well known to require lengthy description here. Under Mr. Wilson's 
able and judicious management it has maintained an envied position in the 
industrial world. Its business is constantly increasing. 

Mr. Wilson came to America at the age of nine. He was the only son of 
a family of four children. Of an ambitious and studious nature, he has be- 
come, by home study and actual contact with the world, a highly educated man 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 887 

in many branches. Mr. Wilson is an interesting conversationalist on current 
topics, possessing" a broad and general knowledge. 

Mr. Wilson was married, Jnne 4, 1871. to Hannah Marie Fitzmaurice, 
daughter of John and Abbie Louise Fitzmaurice. Mrs. Wilson's parents came 
from the north of Ireland and settled near Belvidere, Illinois, where she was 
bom. The union of Mr. and Mrs. Wilson has been blessed by the birth of five 
children, named as follows: Louise, who is at home: George E.. Jr., h^rank E. 
J. Fred and Orrin A. The latter is Pacific coast agent of the Clinton Bridge 
& Iron Works at San Francisco. The other three sons are connected with the 
Clinton office. The four sons and father constitute the board of directors of 
the company. 

Mr. Wilson manifested his loyalty to his adopted country during the 
great crisis in the sixties by forsaking the pleasures of home and offering 
his services during the Civil war by enlisting in the Fifty-second Illinois Volun- 
teer Infantry, Company E, about six months before Lee's surrender, but owang 
to the fnct that the war was drawing to a close he was not permitted to see 
active service. Twice before this enlistment he had run away from home to 
become a soldier, but his father interfered each time, owdng to his youth. He 
won his father's consent in the end. 

Mr. Wilson is a member of all the different Masonic bodies of the York 
and Scottish rites. He has always taken an active interest in the progress of 
Clinton and vicinity and has ever stood ready to do his full share in the work 
of upbuilding this locality in any way. He has always manifested an abiding 
interest in county, state and national affairs, and is regarded by all who know 
him as a high-minded, progressive man. While living at Sterling he served 
very acceptably as alderman, during which time many of the public improve- 
ments of the city were inaugurated. 

In addition to his private interests, he is president of the Merchants 
National Bank of Clinton, which institution is regarded as one of the most 
popular, safe and conservative banks in eastern Iowa. Mr. Wilson's home is 
at No. 306 Sixth avenue. 



FRED REIMERS. 



Among the many enterprising citizens that the German empire has sent 
to Clinton county, the name of Fred Reimers should be mentioned, for he has 
lived here for over a quarter of a centur\', during which time he has become 
well established, ranking among the leading farmers of his community and 
he has maintained an unassailable reputation. He was born in Germany on 



888 CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 

April 17, 1857, and is the son of Clans and Katrina (Aufers) Reimers, na- 
tives of the fatherland, where they spent their lives. The father was a laborer 
and he served as a soldier in the German army, according to the law and cus- 
tom in that country. He made a splendid record as a soldier in the war of 
1848. He spent his life engaged in whatever honest labor he could find for 
a livelihood, having no special profession. 

Fred Reimers grew to maturity in Germany and received the usual com- 
mon school education. Until he reached the age of twenty-five years he 
worked as a laborer on various farms in the old country. In 1882 he emi- 
grated to America, locating in Davenport, Iowa, where he remained two 
months, then moved to Clinton, this state. He worked on a farm the first 
year after his arrival here, after which he worked in Lamb's saw-mill for three 
years. After that he began renting farms. He saved his earnings and in 
1895 he purchased two hundred and twenty acres in Lincoln township, which 
is his present home, and on which he has made many improvements, including 
the erection of substantial and convenient barns and other buildings, making 
this one of the most desirable farms in every respect in the township. He has 
l>een very successful as a general farmer and stock raiser, always keeping some 
good stock. The German Lutheran church holds his membership and he is a 
liberal supporter of the same. 

Mr. Reimers was married on February 6, 1883, to Rebke Solkerwig, 
who was born in Germany. She accompanied her sisters to this country 
when voung. This union has resulted in the birth of the following children : 
Annie, Christina, Emma and Wilhelmina. 

Mr. Reimers is a well informed, far-seeing and capable man of affairs, 
a verv fair example of the first generation from the old country, who by econ- 
omy and hard work develop good farms and comfortable homes for their 
descendants. He has always been a hard worker and is never idle. 



JOSEPH CROSSETT YOUNG. 

This utilitarian age has heen especially prolific in men of action, clear- 
brained men of high resolves and nol)le purposes who have given character 
and stability to the communities which ha^•e been honored by their citizenship, 
and whose influence and leadership have been easily discernible in the various 
enterprises that have added so greatly to the high reputation which Clinton 
county enjoys among her sister counties of this great commonwealth. Con- 




JOSEPH C. YOUNG 



r THEf NEW TORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX, AND 

TILMN FOUNDATIONS 

R L 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 889 

spicnous among this class of men, whose Hfe work lias been terminated l)y 
the fate that awaits all mankind, bnt whose influence will still continue to 
live, was the late Joseph Crossett Young, for his history and that of this 
locality are very closely interwoven and it is safe to say that no man was more 
prominent or did more for the general upbuilding of this vicinity than he. His 
memorv is honored and revered by a host of citizens who knew him or of him 
and his industrious, public-spirited and generous life. This is as it should l)e, 
following the old aphorism, "Honor to whom honor is due." 

Joseph C. Young was born November i, 18 11, in Onondaga county, New- 
York, the scion of a sterling old family of the Empire state, being the son of 
Rev. Seth and Elizabeth (Crossett) Young. He was reared on a farm and 
received such education as he could in the early schools of his native county. 
He went to Detroit, ^Michigan, in 1838 and l)Ought land near there, but he sold 
the same in i'339 and returned to New York and there engaged in the grocery 
business for eight years. Believing that the newer country west of the ^Nlissis- 
sippi river held greater advantages for one of his temperament, he came to 
the present tlndving city of Clinton. Iowa, when there was nothing but a corn- 
field here, and he erected a house where Fourth avenue now intersects with 
Second street and here went into the grocery business. He \vas successful 
from the first, and later he built the Young block, at the corner of Second street 
and Fifth avenue. He saw and took part in the growth of the town in all 
its phases and took a delight in the same. Being successful as a merchant and 
business man, he acquired a competency, becoming in due course of time one 
of the substantial and prominent men of the county, and he spent the latter 
years of his life in retirement. 

~\h'. Young was united in marriage with Sarah J. Stilhvell, August 2, 
1834, and this union was blessed with the following children : Charles M., 
Harriet. Emerson K. (the latter a Methodist minister), and ^\'illiam E., whose 
sketch appears on another page of this work. The mother of these children 
passed to her rest on June 9, 1877, and Mr. Young was again married, Decem- 
ber 6, 1884, his last wife being Laura F. Berrien, of Clinton. She was born 
in New York City, August 24, 1850, and came to this city when young. 

Joseph C. Young was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and 
he took much interest in religious affairs. The first Sunday school class meet- 
ing here was held at his home. He was a member of the first council of the 
city of Clinton, and he was also mayor of the city for two terms. Politically, 
he was a Republican and was loyal to its principles. 

This worthy, and in many respects remarkable, patriarch was gathered 



890 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

in the fullness of his years to the reward of his merits on June i, 1906, leaving 
behind Iiim the rich remembrance of a blameless life to become the inheritance 
of his children and his children's children forever, while he sleeps the sleep of 
tlie just. 



MALCHI KANE MADDEN. 

The character of a community is determined in a large measure by the 
lives of a comparatively few of its members. If its moral and intellectual 
status be good, if in a social way it is a pleasant place in which to reside, if its 
reputation for the integrity of its citizens has extended into other localities, 
it will be found that the standards set In' the leading men have been high and 
their influence such as to mould their characters and shape the lives of those 
with whom they mingle. In placing Malchi Kane Madden in the front rank 
of such men, justice is rendered a biographical fact recognized throughout 
Clinton county by those at all familiar with his history. Although a quiet and 
unassuming man, with no ambition for public position or leadership, he has 
contributed much to the material advancement of the community, while his 
admirable qualities of head and heart and the straightforward, upright course 
of his daily life have tended greatly to the moral standing of the circles in 
which he moves and given him a reputation for integrity and correct conduct 
such as few achieve. 

Mr. Madden was born in Ireland, December 7, 1844, of an excellent old 
family of the Emerald Isle, being the son of ^Michael and IMary (Kane) Mad- 
den, also natives of Ireland, where they grew to maturity, and \vere married. 
They emigrated to America in 1847 ^^^^ settled in Portage, Wisconsin, when 
the subiect was three years old, and there continued to reside until their deaths, 
the mother passing away in 1877 and the father in 1880. They worked hard 
and established a good home in their adopted countiy, and, being kind and 
honest, were popular and highly respected among their neighbors. 

Malchi K. Madden grew to maturity at Portage, Wisconsin, and received 
a good education in the common schools there, spending his early life on the 
farm for the most part. He came to Clinton county. Iowa, in 1871 and 
entered the business world as a merchant at Lyons, in partnership with his 
brother, and carried on a very successful and ever-growdng business for a 
period of thirty-three years, during which time he was an important factor in 
the life of the town and became widely known. He did not remain long in 
partnership with his brother, buying his interest in 1875, carrying on the busi- 
ness after that wnth the assistance of his wife. He ^vas burned out in 1883, 



CLIXTOX COUNTY^ IOWA. 89 1 

but, nothing- daunted, he started up again, buying the building erected by A. B. 
Rodman, in which he continued the grocery business until 1904, when he sold 
out to Fredericks & Quinn, both of whom had clerked for him. 

On November i, 1874, Mr. Aladden was united in marriage with Marga- 
ret Carvel, who was born at Providence, Rhode Island, the daughter of Wil- 
liam and Mary (Davy) Carvel, who came to Clinton county, Iowa, in 1858 and 
settled on a farm twelve miles west of Lyons, where they lived for many years, 
becoming well established and were highly respected. They are both now 
deceased, the mother dying in 1877 ^^^*^ the father in 1900. 

Mr. and Mrs. Madden are pleasant people to know and it is a privilege 
to share their old-time hospitality in their beautiful and pleasant home. Hav- 
ing no children of their own, they adopted two children, a boy and a girl, the 
latter, Winnifred Duhrm, being the eldest; the other, Frank Cook, is now "m 
the United States navy, now sending his twelfth year. The daughter is mar- 
ried and lives in Monmouth, Illinois. 

Mr. Madden has alwavs been a veiw industrious and busv man and, al- 
though a life-long Democrat and interested more or less in party and public 
affairs, has never been an aspirant for office himself. ^Irs. Madden leans 
strongly towards woman suffrage ; she is a well read, refined and ])leasant 
lady and has been of great assistance to her husband in his life work. They 
are both devoted members of the Catholic church and are members of the 
Royal Xeighbors of America and the Mystic Circle, the furmer an auxiliary 
of the Modern Woodmen of America and the latter of the Woodmen of the 
World, Mrs. Madden having been banker of the Mystic Circle for seventeen 
years, and she was also guardian of the Woodmen of the World. They are 
both prominent in local lodge, church and social life and number their friends 
only by the limits of their acquaintance. 



BENJAMIN BROXAM. 

Americans are not hampered by the shackles of class distinction and it is 
ever\^ one's privilege to build the structure of his life as he sees fit. This gives 
us what is often termed the self-made man, a good example of which is found 
in Benjamin Broxam. a well known and highly esteemed citizen of Maquo- 
keta. Jackson county, Iowa, whose interests were long identified with Clinton 
county and who is eminently desendng of a conspicuous place in the history 
of the latter, owing to the fact that he came here when the country was new 
and assisted ven.^ materially in the general upbuilding of the same and led a 



892 CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA, 

life of industry, honesty and one well worth emulation by the younger genera- 
tion whose destinies are yet to be determined by the future. 

Mr. Broxam comes to us from our sister country across the Atlantic, his 
birth having occurred in Lincolnshire, England, May i, 183 1, and now in the 
serene Indian summer of his years, after a long and strenuous life, he can look 
backward with no regrets, since he has always done the best he could in all 
the relations of life. He is the son of Benjamin and Rebecca Broxam, both 
natives of Lincolnshire, England, where they spent their lives, having never 
come to America. The father was a shoemaker by trade. They were the 
parents of six children, of whom Benjamin of this review was the oldest. 
Mr. Broxam had been married before, to which union twelve children had been 
born, making eighteen children in both families. 

Benjamin Broxam began work when only five years of age, his duty being 
to keep crows and other birds from the corn fields and prevent them from 
destroying various crops on the place. He spent his early life on the farm and 
received what education he could in the neighboring schools. It was in 1852 
that he came to America, locating in Ohio, where he remairfed one year and 
then came to Rock Island, Illinois, in 1853 where he located, but soon there- 
after entered one hundred and twenty acres in Welton township, Clinton 
county, Iowa, then returned to Rock Island and worked on the railroad until 
the spring of 1857, when he moved to his farm in Welton township, and soon 
began breaking the raw prairie land and making general improvements, build- 
ing a small frame house. As he prospered, he began adding to his original 
purchase until he owned a \aluable farm of two hundred and eighty acres 
which he placed under a high state of improvement and reaped abundant har- 
vests from year to year. He continued to live there until 1892, when he re- 
tired from active farm Hfe and moved to Maquoketa, Jackson county, where 
he now resides in a cozy and attracti\'e home, modern and neatly furnished. 
He still owns his farm, whicli is one of the best in the community and which 
shows that a gentleman of excellent judgment has had its management in 
band. Politically, Mr. Brox?m is a Democrat, but he has ne\'er held office. 

Mr. Broxam was married about i'858 to Mary Lynch, who was born in 
Belmont county, Ohio, about 1833, and to this union three children were bom: 
Charles, who died in 1895, at the age of thirty-four years; Helen died in 1885 
at the age of twenty- four years ; they were not twins, but their birthday came 
within the same year; Albert L., who was born in 1864, was educated in the 
public school, also at the normal school at Dixon, Illinois, and at the College 
of Pharmacy at Des Moines, Iowa, from which institution he was oraduated, 
after which he worked ir. a drug store at De Witt. Clinton count}', for some 
time ; he then came to Maquoketa, Jackson county, where he also clerked in a 



CLINTON COUNTY,, IOWA. 893 

drug store for some time and about 1892 he bought an interest in the store of 
Walter Dow, where he had been working. Later Mr. Dow sold his interest 
and the firm name became Broxam & Hinkley, which has remained the same, 
these gentlemen now conducting the largest drug store and carrying the most 
complete drug stock in Maquoketa. 

In 1904 All)ert L. Broxam married Alice Langridge. daughter of a well 
known Baptist minister of ^^'aterloo, Iowa. This union has been without 
issue. 

]\Irs. Benjamin Broxam, wife of the subject, was called to her rest in 
1895. The members of this family have always borne a most excellent repu- 
tation and are popular in the various communities where they have resided. 



EDWARD E. YOUNG. 

In naming those who have borne their full share in the upbuilding of 
Center township, Clinton county, mention must not be omitted of Edward E. 
Young, for he has there exerted a strong influence for good, being a man of 
upright principles and desirous to see the advancement of the community 
along moral, educational and material lines. 

Mr. Young was born on August 16, 1865, in this county, and he is the son 
of John A. and Martha Ann (Cox) Young. The father was born in Orange 
county. New York, June 8, 181 5, in which year the family removed to Penn- 
sylvania, where John A. received his education. In 1848 he emigrated to 
Oakland county, Michigan, where he remained eight years, when he moved to 
Iowa and located on a farm of one hundred and sixty acres near Elvira, where 
he spent the rest of his life, dying August 4, 1899, his widow surviving until 
March 16, 1903; they are buried in the cemetery at Elvira. The father was 
a man of much prominence in this county, well known and highly honored. 
He was a member of the sixteenth and seventeenth General Assemblies of 
Iowa, as re]Dresentative on the Democratic ticket, ser\ing his c()unt\' for four 
years in a manner that elicited the hearty approval of his constituents. In 
i860 he was elected to the office of supervisor, which position he held six 
years. AMiile in his twenty-fifth year he was elected captain of the Shippens- 
burg troop, an old cavalary company which had sensed in the war of 1812 
and during the time of his captaincy offered its services for duty in the 
Mexican war. These parents were members of the Presbyterian church, and 
their family consisted of nine children, four sons and five daughters, named 
as follows : Florence, deceased; ]\Iarv, wife of A. M. Kellev; Anna, who was 



894 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

file wife of Rev. T. ^^^ Hamilton, is deceased; Sarah is the wife of W. L, 
Niver; John. James, Echxard, Charles A., and Hattie, wife of S. B. Kelley. 

Edward E. Young, of this review, spent his boyhood on the farm and 
received a common school education. He was married on February 14, 1893, 
to Elizabeth Goddard, daughter of John and Mariam Goddard, both natives 
of England, from which country they came to America about I'S/o, locating 
at Clinton, Iowa, where Mr. Goddard engaged in the mercantile business. 
His death occurred in June, 1897. 

Mr. and Mrs. Young began their married life on his present farm, which 
he had rented of his sister, Mrs. Kelley, whose husband was killed on the 
tower of his feed wind-mill, having his leg crushed and he remained without 
help for an hour while the mill continued to grind, the men below not know- 
ing that he was fastened in the machinery above. In 1904 Mr. Young pur- 
chased his sister's farm, the Kelley place, which consists of three hundred and 
twenty acres of fine farming land, which has been extensively improved and 
ranks with the best farms of the community. Besides general farming Mr. 
Young is an extensive feeder of stock, and he has numerous barns, sheds and 
outbuildings in whicli to properly care for them. His residence is a very com- 
fortable and neat one. He buys and feeds many cattle and hogs, and he is 
very successful in all his operations. He is a good judge of all kinds of stock 
and is well known as a stockman throughout the county. He is honest and 
stands high in the community. 

Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Young, namely : Clarence, 
born September 28, 1895 ; Ethel, born November 21, 1896; Claude, born June 
27, 1898; Gladys, born August 6, 1902. 



WILLIAM R. TRAVER. 

One of the well known and progressive citizens of Camanche township, 
Clinton county, is William R. Traver, a man who has worked long and hard 
to advance himself along lines that are consistent and seldom fail to bring the 
reward sought. He comes of one of the old and honored families of this 
county and his birth occurred here on November 9, 1862. He is the son of 
Rufus and Mary J. (Balentine) Traver. The father was born in 1832 and 
the mother in 1834, the former a native of New York and the latter of Ohio. 
They came to Clinton county, Iowa, about i860 and purchased a farm of one 
hundred and sixty acres in Center township and engaged in general farming, 
becoming well established here. Rufus Traver was a very successful business 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 895 

man and took much interest in local affairs. He served his township as 
assessor, tax collector and justice of the peace, filling each position with much 
credit for a number of years. In 1895 he retired, purchasing property in 
Clinton, where he moved and where he now resides. He is a member of the 
Congregational church, and, politically, is a Republican. Five children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Traver, namely : Ella married Mr. Allen, of New York 
City; Daisy is now Mrs. Hill, of Clinton county; Roy L. lives in Clinton, 
where he has a position in a bank; Carroll B. lives in Chicago; William R., 
of this review. The mother of these children died on February 17. 191 1, 
and is liuried at Elvira. 

The boyhood days of the subject of this sketch were spent on the farm 
with his parents. He received a good common school education and later 
took a business course at Ouincy, Illinois. He was married on April 27, 
1888, to Mariah Mahen, daughter of George and Mary Mahen, of this county. 
Her parents were natives of Ireland. They came to America and settled in 
Clinton county on a farm in Center township. They retired and made their 
home in Elvira in 1889. purchasing a home there and they spent the remainder 
of their lives in that place. George Mahen was born May 10, 1818, and died 
February 28, 1895 ; his wife was born May lo, 1833, and died March 5, 1899. 
and they are both buried at Elvira cemetery. Mr. Mahen began life without 
means, but by his industry and good management he accumulated a very 
valuable estate and became the owner of six hundred acres of land. His 
family consisted of five children, namely: Roger M. ; Ella, now Mrs. Crapser; 
Minnie, who married a 'Sir. Cromer, is deceased; Kate, now Mrs. Kelley ; 
Mariah is the wife of AA'illiam R. Traver of this review: there are also two 
half brothers and a h^lf sister. 

Mr. and Mrs. William R. Traver began their married life on rented land 
and in 1896 he purchased his father's farm, which is still his home. It con- 
sisted then of one hundred and sixty acres. He has added to this as he has 
prospered until he now has a very fine farm of three hundred and twenty 
acres, consisting of as choice land as Camanche township affords. Part of it 
lies in Lincoln township, adjoining. He has made extensive improvements on 
his land, all modern and up-to-date. He is regarded as one of the leading 
farmers and stock raisers in the township. For a number of years he has 
engaged in breeding and raising Polled-Angus cattle, of which he has a choice 
herd. They are eagerly sought for owing to their superior quality. 

^\r anfl ^Irs. Tra\"er are members of the Lutheran church, and, politi- 
cally, he is a Repulth'can. They have no famil}- of their own. Tliey took her 
sister's child when it was two weeks old. its mother ha^•ino^ died, and thev have 



896 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

adopted him. Frank Cromer was born October 19, 1903. They also have 
given his sisters, Leda Marie and Maiy Margaret, a home in their family. 
They are much attached to these children and give them every chance to be- 
come worthy citizens. 



PETER CHRISTEXSEN. 

From small beginnings Peter Christensen, a well known citizen of Olive 
township, Clinton county, has gradually attained a prominence in this locality 
which entitles him to be regarded as one of its worthiest citizens. No asper- 
sions can be made on any action of his during a pilgrimage of nearly forty 
years here, during which time he has seen his community grow and has taken 
a great interest in the general development of the same. Like many of our 
leading farmers, he comes to us from Norway, having been born in that 
country in 1840, the son of Chris Hansen and Bertha (Johns) Christensen, 
both natives of Norway, where they were reared, educated and married, and 
in which country the father died. His son Peter grew to maturity there and 
was educated in the common schools and when twenty-one years of age, in 
186 1, his mother brought him to America, coming direct to Calamus, Clinton 
county, Iowa. Here the son began working out. He was a hard worker and 
economical, saved his earnings and was in due course of time enabled to pur- 
chase eighty acres of land where he still lives, having, however, added to this 
until he now has an excellent farm of one hundred and sixty acres, which he 
has brought up to a high state of improvement. He has a good substantial 
home and outljuildings. his place being well improved in every way, all of 
which, or most all. he has done himself. He has lived here all the time since 
coming to America with the exception of three years, from 1898 to 1901, spent 
in Minnesota. He there owned two hundred and eighty acres of land and 
raised grain very extensively. He is a general farmer and stock raiser and he 
is a stockholder in the Farmers Bank at Calamus. He has been very success- 
ful as a business man, having managed well and persisted along lines which he 
deemed worthy to be followed and wrought out. 

]\Ir. Christensen was married in 1867 to Anna Ludwigson. who was 
born in 1844 in Norway, from which country she came to America with her 
parents in i860 and located in Clinton county, Iowa; later they went west. 
This union has resulted in the birth of the following children : Bertha 
A^ergensen, Walter, Elizabeth, Christ (deceased), Mary Mason, Irene Mason, 
Rena, Lena, Irena and Anna. Mrs. Christensen died in 1892 and was buried 
in the Lutheran cemetery, in Olive township. 



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CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 897 

This family are Lutherans in their rehgious belief, and Mr. Christensen 
is a Republican and has held some of the township offices in a way that re- 
flected much credit upon himself and to the satisfaction of all concerned. He 
was school director for some time and also road boss. 



ANDREW JACKSON RIGGS. 

Andrew Jackson Riggs, a retired farmer of Maquoketa. Jackson county, 
Iowa, was born near Lyons, Wayne county. New York, June 21, 1832. He is 
the son of John and Alma (Growls) Riggs. The father was born April 11, 
1798, in New Jersey and was the son of John Riggs, Sr., who in 1799 moved 
his family to Wayne county, New York, and bought a tract of timber land of 
the Holland Purchase Company. This tract of timberland is now a part of 
the city of Lyons, John Riggs, Sr., sold the land and purchased another 
tract, where he lived until his death. 

John Riggs, Jr., was reared on the farm and assisted his father in the 
cultivation of the same. He had a brother-in-law named Hull, who was a 
colonel during the war of 18 12, in the American army, and while home on a 
furlough took John Riggs, then a boy, along with him to the lines and he there 
served as tre Co'oneFs l^ofiv-servant. Lie Carried a rnnsket v-ith the rest of 
the soldiers and became something of a pet among the men of the army. He 
remained with the army until the close of the war. Returning to his home 
at the expiration of that time, he remained there a time and then \vent to 
Canada, where he was emnloyed in the lumljer regions. He spent seven years 
in this vicinity and then returned to his old home. 

In 1826 John Riggs, Jr., married Alma Growl, who Was born in Cayuga 
county, New York, May 11, 1807. Directly after their marriage they went 
to Allegany county, where he bought timber land, built a small house of 
logs, cleared and cultivated the farm. About 1831 he returned to Wayne 
county and settled on his fathers farm and there he remained until 1837, 
W'hen, fired with the western fever, he came to the territory of Iowa, via the 
Erie canal to Buffalo, by the lakes to Cleveland, thence by the Ohio river 
to the Mississippi river and un the Mississippi to Burlington. At that city 
the family spent the winter. During this wdnter the subject, A. J. Riggs, saw 
Chief Black Hawk, who used to go into Burlington for supplies. While the 
family remained in Burlington John Riggs and a timber man from Indiana 
tramped overland to Maquoketa, Jackson county, low-a, to find a brother of 

(57) 



898 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

the former, Reuben Riggs, who owned a farm and log house on the hne be- 
tween Chnton and Jackson counties. John Riggs returned to BurHngton and 
in the spring took steamboat and went up the river to Lyons, which then con- 
tained but three houses; from there he went by boat to Sabula, and came 
through the country on foot to his brother s log cabin. Accompanying him 
on this journey was his wife and six children, one, C. R. Riggs, being but 
three years old and another a babe of six months, whom they had to carry. 
The subject was but five years old, and he had to walk. Mr. Riggs entered 
land in section 6 in what later became Bloomfield township, Clinton county, 
and he was the first white settler in the township. He erected a log house 
on this land and there he lived until 1849. He, as was the case with hundreds 
of others, was drawn toward California in the year last mentioned and while 
en route was taken sick and died, being buried near Elkhorn rix'er. He was 
survived by his wife and eight children, namely: George W., Ashley C, John 
H., Andrew J., Charles R., DeWitt C. (these children having all been born in 
New York and brought by their parents to Iowa), Ann (born in i'840 in 
Clinton county), Zachary T. 

Andrew J., the subject, and Zachary T. "Riggs, residing at Biloxi, Missis- 
sippi, are the only surviving members of the family. Mrs. Riggs, the mother 
of these children, departed this life March 8. 1899. 

As before stated, Andrew J. Riggs was but five years old when he ac- 
companied his parents to Iowa. He was seventeen at the time of his father's 
death and he assisted his brothers in the managing of the home place, residing 
on the old homestead until 1864. He was married in that year and located in 
1865 on a farm of one hundred and sixty acres at Riggs Station, Waterford 
township, Clinton county. He bought this land in 1854, then wild prairie, 
and began the cultivation of it. The first eighty acres was all under cultiva- 
tion by i860. He planted shade and fruit trees and built a set of frame build- 
ings. Later he added other land to his original purchase and at one time 
owned two hundred and eighty acres in Waterford township. In 1865 he 
also owned one hundred and sixty acres in Minnesota. He at one time owned 
the townsite of Monticello. Minnesota, and also owned between one thousand 
and fifteen hundred acres of land in various counties throughout the state of 
Iowa. In 1896 he retired from active farm life and bought a modern resi- 
dence in Maquoketa, Jackson county, Iowa, where he at present resides. 

Mr. Riggs' domestic life began in 1864, on March 13th of which year he 
was united in marriage with Eliza Jane Mullholland, who was born at Auburn 
Center, Ohio, March 15, 1844. She is the daughter of Rev. Richard and 
Eliza E. (Abbey) Mullholland. He was born in Londonderry, Ireland, of 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 899 

Scotch-Irish parentage, in the year 1823. At the age of sixteen he came 
to America and turned his attention to the attainment of an eckication. He 
was graduated from Brighton (Ohio) College, when twenty-three years of 
age and became a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church. In June. 1843, 
he married Eliza E. Abbey, who was born in Auburn, Ohio. 1826. In the 
spring of 1852 they moved to Iowa and he acted as supply preacher for con- 
gregations near Preston and Charlotte, Clinton county. He bought eighty 
acres of Mr. Holroyd, a pioneer millwright who located about two miles west 
of Preston. In 1853 he joined the Iowa conference and was assigned to the 
Jackson county circuit. He traveled and preached in different counties in 
Iowa and in 1856 came back to Maquoketa. and opened a boot and shoe store 
in partnership with another man, but he failed in this and in 1858 went to 
California overland. He followed just behind the Mountain Meadow massa- 
cre and in company with an emigrant train from Texas who crossed the place 
of the massacre a few days after the awful event happened. He remained 
in California for four years and on account of failing health returned to 
Maquoketa, where he died September 11. 1863. He was a member of the 
Masonic and Independent Order of Odd Fellows lodges. He left a wife and 
one child, who is now Mrs. Riggs. Mrs. Mullholland returned to Portage 
county, Ohio, in the fall of 1864 and died there on March 8, 1885. 

Mr. and Mrs. Riggs became the parents of two children. Elmer Els- 
worth Riggs, born February 16. i86f^, died September 7, 1893; ^^ ^^^^^ ^^^^' 
vived by his wife, but no children. Lindus L. Riggs, born August 29, 1868, 
graduated from Maquoketa high school in 1887. He taught school at Riggs, 
Clinton county, and various other places for fourteen terms. Later he became 
the successor of his brother, Elsworth. agent of the Chicago, Milwaukee & 
St. Paul Railroad at Riggs, where he remained four years. In the fall of 
1900 he entered Keokuk Medical College and was graduated in 1904, engaging 
in the practice at Maquoketa, Iowa, but in 1905 went to Jefferson Medical 
College of Philadelphia, from which he was graduated in June, 1906. As a 
surgeon he has gained much prominence and since 1907 has conducted the 
Maquoketa City Hospital, which he owns. January i, 1908, he married 
Elizabeth Hurst, daughter of Hon. Alfred Hurst, of Hurstville, Jackson 
county, Iowa. They have one child, Ralph LeRoy Riggs. 

Mrs. C. I. Riggs is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr, 
Riggs. though religiously inclined, is not a member of any church. Politically, 
he is independent. 

Andrew J. Riggs has a flint-lock musket and bayonet made in 1809 and 
carried in the war of 1812 by William Birch. At the close of the war the 



900 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

subject's father bought the gun. Mrs. John Riggs gave the gun to the sub- 
ject's oldest son, who is now deceased. Mrs. Riggs owns and has in her 
possession an account book, w^hich has been handed down from one generation 
in her father's family to another. The first account now recorded in the book 
is January, 1755. One of the items is "One Pint Whiskey at 11^ cts." 
This book was in the Mullholland family and was written in Ireland. 

■ A. T. Riggs' two brothers served through the Civil war. Charles R. 
Riggs, who enlisted in Company L, Second Cavalry, and went in as orderly 
sergeant and served four years, eight months and ten days and was discharged 
as captain. He was provost marshal of Bolivar Parish, Mississippi, for eight 
months. Taken prisoner while resting along the roadway in Missouri, in 
1862, and remained a prisoner for three months, when he was exchanged. 
De Witt C. Riggs enlisted in the Thirty-first Iowa Volunteer Infantry from 
Maquoketa. He was commissioned as second lieutenant March 31, 1863, 
and promoted first lieutenant September 23, 1864. He resigned on account 
of disability from bowel trouble in the fall of 1864. Another brother, Ashley 
C. Riggs, enlisted at Dubuque, Iowa, in a regiment of dragoons in 1847. ^^^ 
was ."ssigred to dr,ty at Fort Atkinson, Iowa, serving until the close of the 
Mexican war. 

Mrs. A. J. Riggs, who lived at Maquoketa during the w^ar, assisted in 
making the flags of the companies (five in number) which left Maquoketa. 
Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Riggs adopted a young girl aged ten by the name of 
Minnie C. Albright. She was born October 14, 1865. Her father, who was 
a widower, gave his permission for her to live with them until she was eigh- 
teen ; she remained until she was twenty-four, when she married Levi T. Allen, 
of Miles, Iowa, on March 13, 1890. He died on January 12, 1897, leaving 
his wife and one daughter, Laura A. Allen, born September i, 189 1. Els- 
worth L. Allen was born March 5, 1893. Since her husband's death Mrs. 
Allen and her children have made their home with Mrs. Riggs, 'with the ex- 
ception of four or five years. 

In the year 1895 the subject fitted c ut a circus for his son Dr. L. L.. brt 
on account of the hard times then prevailing, the circus failed in 1896. Mrs. 
E. J. Riggs is a beautiful writer of poetry. She wrote for many years for 
the Clinton County Advertiser. 



THEODORE C. RITTER. 

One of the successful and well liked farmers of Orange township, Clin- 
ton county, is Theodore C. Ritter, a man who is eminently deserving of the 
success that has attended his efforts owing to the fact that he has w^orked hard 



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CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 9OI 

along legitimate lines and has always led a life of honesty and shaped his 
course to goodly ends. 

Mr. Ritter was born in Rock Island county, Illinois, March 31, 1856, and 
is the son of Leonard and Theresa (King) Ritter, the father a native of 
Prussia, Germany, and the mother born in Bavaria, Germany. They were 
educated and married in their native land and came to Rock Island county, 
Illinois, in about 1845. They subsequently moved to Clinton county, Iowa, 
and settled on a farm two miles west of Grand Mound, Olive township, on 
two hundred and eighty acres, and here they lived until their deaths. Their 
family consisted of four sons and four daughters, of whom seven are now 
living, Mrs. John P. Saddler being deceased ; she lived at De Witt, this county. 
Politically, Leonard Ritter was a Democrat and he and his family were mem- 
bers of the Catholic church. 

Theodore C. Ritter, of this review, was reared on a farm and was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Olive township. He worked in Davenport for 
some time on a delivery wagon for the CaWe Lumber Company. He later 
turned his attention to farming, and he is now the owner of an excellent 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres one and one-half miles north of Grand 
Mound. Orange township, on which he'^arries, on general farming and stock 
raising. He has put excellent improvements on his place, and has a very 
comfortable home. He always keeps some good stock which he prepares 
for the market. ... 

Politically, Mr. Ritter is a Democrat and he has long taken considerable 
interest in local affairs. He was constable of his township for two years, fill- 
ing this office to the satisfaction of all concerned. He and his family are 
members of the Catholic church. 

Mr. Ritter was married on April 14, 1884, to Mary J. Martin, a native 
of Clinton county, Iowa, and the daughter of Thomas and Jane (Halpin) 
Martin, early settlers of Scott county, this state. To this union two sons 
and four daughters were born, namely : Loretta, Raymond, William. May, 
Genevieve (deceased) and Bernadine (deceased). The mother of these 
children died December 24, 1900. Her parents were both born in Ireland, 
from which country they came to Davenport, Iowa, when there were only a 
few houses in that place. They came to Clinton county, this state, in 187*8, 
and located on two hundred acres of land and here the father died on April 
II, 1896, the mother dying in about 1897. Nine children were born to them, 
five of whom are living. This family were Catholics and in politics Thomas 
Martin was a Democrat. 



902 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

JOHN WILLIAMS. 

No better evidence of fidelity to duty, upright character and popular per- 
sonality could be secured than a continuous service with one concern for a 
period of thirty-two years. That is the length of time that John Williams, 
one of the best known men in railroad circles in Clinton county, has been in 
the employ of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad Company, and he has 
always been regarded as one of their most trusted and faithful employes, 
always ready to discharge his duties to the best of his ability and with no 
thought of shirking or misrepresenting the facts. As a result of such char- 
acteristics he has not only Won the confidence and respect of his employers 
and associates in railroad circles, but also of all with whom he has come into 
contact and he is in every way deserving of the high respect in which he is 
held. 

Mr. Williams was born at Sterling, Illinois, July i6, 1866, and he is the 
son of Michael and Mary (Pendergast) Williams. The father was born in 
county Kings, Ireland, April 10. 1826, and the mother was born in county 
Queens, Ireland. They were married in England in 1853 and came to 
America in 1855, locating in Chicago, where they resided a short time, then 
came to Sterling, Illinois, at the time the Chicago & Northwestern railroad 
was being built through there, and the father assisted in the work of laying 
the tracks into Sterling. After a short time he entered the coal and grain 
business in which he remained for a period of thirty years, doing a large 
business and becoming widely known in that country. He lived retired dur- 
ing the last few years of his life, and died at his home in Sterling, on Novem- 
ber 10, 1903. His widow is still living. Fourteen children were born to 
them, ten of whom are living, four being deceased. Michael Williams was a 
Democrat and an earnest worker in the party, but he refused to be a candidate 
for office many times. He gave his large family a good education and pro- 
vided \vell for them. He lived a rather quiet and retired life. He was a 
faithful Catholic, an excellent business man, a generous giver to St. Mary's 
Catbolic church, of Axhich he was a member, nnd he was greatly missed in his 
community, his death being lamented by all classes. He had one daughter at 
the time of his death who was a prominent musician in Kansas City, Missouri, 
but she is now deceased. She was a nun of the Order of Charity and was 
mother superior of an Indian mission in Michigan. 

John Williams was educated in the public schools of Sterling, Illinois, and 
when a boy he began working for the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad Com- 
pany, beginning carrying water at the age of twelve years. He went from 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 9O3 

that to the roundhouse, then became switchman, fireman and engineer, having 
been an engineer since 1886. As stated above, he has spent his Hfe in the 
service of this road. 

Pohtically. Mr. WilHams is a Democrat and both he and his wife are 
memljers of the Catholic church. He belongs to the Knights of Cokimbus 
and the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers. 

Mr. Wilhams was married on December 31, 1896, to Ellen Murphy, of 
Anamosa, Iowa, the daughter of Patrick and Ellen Murphy, who came to 
America in a very eirly day and settled in Connecticut, in which state thev mar- 
ried, subsequently coming to Iowa. Mr. Murphy devoted his life to farming. 
Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Williams. Marie, now twelve 
years old. and Laurence, aged ten. 



RUDOLPH FREDERICK SIEMSEN. 

Among the substantial farmers of Berlin township, Clinton county, Iowa, 
is the well known gentleman whose brief biography is presented in the follow- 
ing lines. Rudolph F. Siemsen is a native of Holstein, Germany, where his 
birth occurred on the 15th of August. 1855, being one of twelve children, 
whose parents, Henry and Dora Lucy Siemsen, were also born and reared in 
that province. Henry Siemsen spent his entire life in Holstein and died in the 
year 1869; his wife, who survived him. is still living and resides near the place 
where she first saw the light of day. Six of their children also survive, three 
in Germany and three in the United States. 

Rudolph Frederick Siemsen spent his childhood and youth on the farm 
which his father cultivated, and enjoyed the advantages of a common school 
education. While still young he learned the bartender's trade and in 1878 
entered the German army, with which he served until 1881. In 1882 he came 
to the United States, going via the isthmus of Panama to San Francisco, 
California, thence to Washington territory, where he remained for two 
years, during which time he lived principally in what is now Garfield county 
and supported himself by various kinds of employment. At the expiration 
of the period indicated he came to Scott county, Iowa, where he remained 
from August. 1884, to March of the ensuing year, when he went to Omaha, 
Nebraska, thence, after a short time, to Council Bluffs, in which city he was 
in business until his removal to Atlantic, Cass county, this state, in 1889. 
Disposing of his interest in the latter place he went to Billings, Montana, but 
not being satisfied with conditions there, soon returned to Iowa, and during 



904 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

the two ensuing years lived in Cass county, where he had formerly been in 
business. . 

On October i, 1891, Mr. Siemsen was married in the town of Atlantic 
to Lena Husmann, a native of the same German province in which he was 
born, and immediately thereafter engaged in farming in Cass county, where he. 
continued to reside until 1899, when he sold out and went to the state of 
Washington. After remaining a year there, he came to Clinton county, Iowa, 
and bought a tract of land in Berlin township, on which he has since lived and 
prospered. 

Mr. Siemsen has had quite a chequered, but. in the main, successful. 
career. He now has a finely improved farm, a beautiful and attractive home 
and is in comfortable circumstances, with every assurance of a prosperous 
career in the future. He is veiy industrious, manages his affairs judiciously 
and manifests commendable interest in all matters of importance to the com- 
munity in which he resides. In politics he is independent, being allied to no 
party and using his judgment in the matter of voting, giving his support to 
the candidates best qualified for the positions to which they aspire. In religion 
he holds to the creed of the Lutheran church, in which both himself and wife 
were reared, and since becoming a resident of Clinton county, he has been, 
quite active and influential in the local church to which he belongs. He is a 
pleasant gentleman, courteous in demeanor and his popularity extends to the, 
limits of his acquaintance. He has many warm friends who prize him for the 
sterling worth of his character and he uses his influence on the right side o.f 
ever}^ moral issue. Mr. and Mrs. Siemsen have two children, Freda Rosa 
and Lena Alarguerite Marie, who, like their parents, are popular with their 
friends and acquaintances. 



ALBERT A. BARBER. 

■:•!:■-■> 

" ' ' ^ ■ ,■ '. 

Having been born and reared in Orange township, Clinton county,, and 
since reaching manhood's estate identified with large agricultural interests of 
this community, it is not strange that A. A. Barber should be widely and 
favorably known within the confines of the territory in question. ;Hi.s career 
has been marked with success at almost every turn. . . •. 

The date of Mr. Barber's birth was 1853 ^"^ he is the son of Nathaniel 
Barber, a full sketch of whom is to be found elsewhere in this work. Suffice 
it to say here^ that he comes of one of the excellent old pioneer families of this 
county. . . _t . ., 



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CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 905 

Mr. Barber was educated in the home schools and when but a mere lad 
was put to work in the fields and he has spent his entire life on the home 
farm, which is a rare privilege, for the assocations of the old homestead are 
always pleasant. He has thus always farmed, and, having grown up to this 
line of endeavor, he has mastered every detail of general husbandry and his 
efforts have been attended by a large measure of success. He has one of the 
best farms in this part of the county, consisting of four hundred and ninety- 
five acres, all in Orange township comprising two farms, one of one hundred 
and sixty-five acres and the other of three hundred and thirty acres. He has 
kept the places well improved in every respect and has tilled the soil with 
such care as to keep it up to its original strength and productiveness. Besides 
general farming, he has always devoted considerable attention to stock rais- 
ing, always keeping an excellent grade of stock. Other interests have also 
claimed his attention and it was he who organized the Farmers Mutual Tele- 
phone Company of Clinton in 1902; he became president of the company, 
which office he still holds to the credit of himself and to the entire satisfaction 
of all concerned, in fact, his judicious and able management has been respon- 
sible for its large success, and it is rapidly growing in importance and popular- 
ity. 

Mr. Barber is a Republican in politics, and he has long taken more or 
less interest in local affairs, having been assessor of Orange township for a 
period of six years, was trustee of the township for a period of four years, 
has been local school director for many years and was census enumerator in 
1900. As a public servant he has been very faithful in the discharge of his 
duties. 

Mr. Barber was married on May 3, 1877, to Laura C. Simmons, who was 
born and reared in Orange township and educated in the local schools; her 
family has long been a highly respected one here. This union has resulted 
in the birth of one son, Earl G., who is assisting his father with the work on 
the farm ; the son is a member of the Modern Brotherhood of America and he 
is a very promising young business man. He married Elsie Smith, of De 
Witt township, the daughter of Henry F. and Louisa (Hoehne) Smith. Her 
parents came from Germany to Clinton county in an early day and are num- 
bered among its respected and influential families. The elder Barber is also 
a member of the Modern Brotherhood, — in fact has been its secretary from 
its organization to the present time. He also belongs to the Knights of 
Pythias, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and he and his wife are 
members of the Rebekahs. 



906 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

JACOB SCHROEDER. 

A German community always seems to be a prosperous one. The Ger- 
mans have such a combination of racial qualities as to be well adapted to all 
situations in life. The traveler in Iowa can usually recognize the German 
community by its appearance, the neatness of the buildings, the general air of 
good repair and the thriftiness of the crops and stock. The farm which Mr. 
Schroeder owns presents to the passer-by a particularly attractive picture, for 
he is an exceptionally good farmer even among the exceptional farmers of his 
township. 

Jacob Schroeder was born in Germany on March i8, 1866, the son of 
Andros and Catherine (Pruring) Schroeder, both natives of Germany, where 
Andros Schroeder died in 1870, and his widow is now living. They were 
the parents of five children, four of whom are living, and were much honored 
and respected persons. Their son Jacob received his education in Germany, 
and came to Scott county, Iowa, in 1885, seeking to try his fortune in a newer 
continent of wondrous possibilities. Later, in 1885, he came to Clinton 
county, and in 1901 bought eighty acfes of land, in 1904 forty more, and has 
added until he now owns two hundred acres of splendid land. His farming 
is general in character and he gives much attention to stock raising. Nearly 
all of the buildings and improvements on his fann have been put there by him- 
self. In religion he adheres to the Lutheran faith of his fathers. 

Jacob Shroeder was married in 1891 to Aup'usta Blunk. a native of 
Germany, She has borne to him four children, Hugo, Laura, Freda and 
Matilda. Mrs. Schroeder died in 1898, and Mr. Schroeder was married in 
1 90 1 to Mrs. Mary Erbs, of Clinton county, by whom he is the father of one 
child, Willie. 

Mr. Schroeder is much respected by those who know him, as a man of 
good judgment and reasoning powers, and a successful farmer, while his oblig- 
ing nature has made for him many friends. 



JOHN W. SIMON. 



Success has been worthily attained by John W. Simon, of Center township, 
Clinton county, for he has led an active and useful life along lines that seldom 
fail to win the goal sought. He was born on July 23, 1869, in this county, and 
is the son of George and Mary Simon, natives of Lincolnshire, England, where 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 907 

thev grew to maturity and were educated. From that country they came to 
America in 1851. locating in Illinois, where they remained for a few months, 
then moved to Clinton county. Iowa, and bought a farm near Low Moor, 
which he sold after a residence of two years and purchased other land nearby. 
He soon traded this for the farm on which his son, John W. of this review, now 
resides and there the elder Simon and his wife spent the remainder of their 
days, the father dying on November 21. 1906, at the age of seventy-eight years, 
the mother having passed away in 1S99. at the age of seventy-one years, and 
they are both buried at the Elvira cemetery. The first farm which Mr. Simon 
purchased consisted of eighty acres and to this he added thirty-six acres in 
section 12, Center township, and he became a well-known farmer and stock 
man. He fed many cattle for the market, kept his farm well improved and 
was very successful. He became well known and was highly respected among 
the early settlers of this county. He and his wife were members of the Meth- 
odist church, and they were the parents of eight children, two of whom died in 
early life; Robert W. also is deceased; those living are Mary, wife of F. Hes- 
kett, of Kansas; Lizzie, of Lincoln township, the wife of Robert Bray; Ellen 
Simon. Bessie Simmons and John Simon. 

John Simon, of this review, received a good education, first attending the 
common schools, then the Clinton Business College, also the normal school at 
Fulton. He was married on February 14, 1906, to Nettie Thomas, daughter 
of William and Eliza Thomas, of this county. Her parents were natives of 
Wales and they came to America in 1870, with their parents, who later located 
in Clinton county, Iowa, and they were married in 1874. They were members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. The father has devoted his life to farming 
and he and his wife are both living. They are the parents of four children. 
Mrs. Simon was born August 3, 1877. 

Mr. and Mrs. Simon began their married life on the farm where they now 
reside, the old family homestead, which Mr. Simon purchased from his father. 
It consists of two hundred and forty acres and is one of the most desirable 
farms in this locality. He has made many improvements and has kept it in 
first class condition in every respect. He has a cozy and attractive home, car- 
ries on general farming and stock raising and feeds a great many cattle, being 
regarded as one of the leading farmers and stock men in his community. He 
is a public spirited man, is well posted on current events and employs all modern 
methods in farming, being very successful. 

The following children have been born to ]\Ir. and Mrs. Simon : Marie 
Elizabeth, born February 10, 1907; Edith May, born December 4, 1907; Ethel 
Fay, born the same date, being a twin of Edith May; Robert William, born 
May 28, 1909. 



•908 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

ARTHUR WOOD BLUNT, M. D. 

In time of sickness and need the ph3^sician is the closest friend to his 
brother man. He, even more than members of any other profession, has an 
opportunity to do real good, in relieving actual physical pain and suffering. 
The troubles which he heals are of a different class from those which the 
lawyer and minister find it their province to mitigate, and are of a more sub- 
stantial and intimate nature. He alone of all has the power to stay the hand 
of death and prolong the number of our earthly years. 

Arthur Wood Blunt was born in Dalton, Georgia, July 30, 1854, the 
son of John E. and Augusta (Wood) Blunt. His paternal grandfather, A. 
E. Blunt, was a native of New Hampshire, his wife of Connecticut. They 
moved South in an early day to Dalton, Georgia, where Mr. Blunt engaged in 
the mercantile business. Doctor Blunt's father married in Newburyport, 
Massachusetts, and went to Georgia, to practice his chosen profession, that of 
c'v:l\ engineer. Coming north at the breaking out of the war, he moved to 
Wisconsin and was engaged in the employ of what was then the Old Galena 
& Chicago Union railway which soon became a part of the Chicago & North- 
western railway system. He continued in their employ until two years ago, 
when having given his time and attention to the railroad work for a period 
of forty-eight years and rising to the position of consulting engineer, he was 
retired on a pension. He still resides at Evanston, Illinois. He was the 
father of six children, one of whom is the vice-president of the Merchant's 
Loan and Trust Company of Chicago. All of the children except one are now 
living. 

Doctor Blunt was educated at Wheaton College, Illinois, receiving his 
Bnrhelor of Arts deeree in 1873. ^"^^ his Master of Arts degree in 1876. He 
then entered the Chicago Homeopathic College and graduated in 1878. For 
a time he was house physician in the Homeopathic Hospital, then spent two 
years in Winona, Minnesota. He came to Clinton, May i, 188 1, where he 
has remained in practice ever since. He is now the longest resident physician 
in Clinton. His practice has been extensive and successful. In politics he 
is a progressive Republican. He is a member of the Woodmen of the World, 
the Royal Arcanum, the American Institute of Homeopathy and the Hahne- 
mann Medical Association of Iowa and secretary of the Rock River Institute 
of Homeopathy. He is also a member of the staff of Agatha Hospital of 
Clinton. The Congregationalist church includes the Doctor and his wife 
among its members. 

Doctor Blunt was married on October 4, 1883, to Alice A. Mullett, a 




ARTHUR W. BLUNT, M. D. 



THE ^^W YORK 
PUBLIC LIBUAUY 



ASTOR, lENO^' A^B 
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS 

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CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 909 

native of Indiana, who has borne to him two children, Eugenia and Valeria. 
He is a man of splendid personal character, broad culture and liberal educa- 
tion. He has kept up with the latest advances in the school of medicine to 
which he belongs and stands high among his professional associates. He is 
possessed of the traits of character which gain and keep friends, and is much 
esteemed generally, both at home and abroad. 



CHAUNCEY SPENCER HARRINGTON. 

The life portrayed under the present heading shows plainly the oppor- 
tunities which the farm affords, and shows that there one may pass as useful 
and pleasant a life as at any other place or in any other occupation and may 
be as successful there as anywhere else, whether success be measured by the 
amount of property accumulated or the character which a man builds. Farm- 
ing leads into other allied businesses often, as in the case of Mr. Harrington, 
and many of the most successful business men in the smaller towns and cities 
have passed the earlier portion of their lives in farming. 

Chauncey Spencer Harrington was born in Otsego county. New York, 
October lo, 1830, son of Stukely and Elizabeth Harrington. (For their his- 
tory see sketch of Andrew L. Harrington.) His boyhood was little different 
from that of most farm boys, and was spent in attending the schools of his 
township in the winter and working in the summers. As a young man he took 
up farming and was also concerned in lumbering operations in his home 
county. On October 5. 1866, he came to Clinton county, Iowa, to which his 
parents and brother had preceded him. Here he was very extensively en- 
gaged in farming, and also was a large grain dealer. He owns five hundred 
and fifty-seven acres of good farm land in Clinton county and other property 
in De Witt, and in his days of activity was reckoned as one of the best farmers 
in the county. He is also a business man of rare judgment. In politics he 
was a Democrat before the formation of the Republican party, but was after- 
wards a member of the latter party, and, while taking a becoming activity in 
politics, has never cared for office. He is a member of Right Hand Lodge No. 
281, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; of Kilwimming Chapter No. 56, 
Royal Arch Masons; of Holy Cross Commandery No. 10, Knights Templar, 
and of the thirty-second degree in Clinton Lodge, DeMolay Consistory, of 



910 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

Clinton, Iowa. He has always taken great interest in things Masonic and has 
exemphfied its teachings in his Hfe. 

Mr. Harrington was married on December 25, 1855, in Genesee county, 
New York, to May Comstock, daughter of Gideon Comstock, who died in 
New York. Mrs. Harrington died August 19, 1907, after having been a 
faithful wife for nearly fifty-two years. Mr. Harrington has now retired 
from active business. 

He can look back over a life of more than usual achievement and worth. 
He is a man the worth of whose character is unquestioned, and one whose 
neighbors speak of only in the highest terms. Such citizens the county can 
well be proud of. 



WILLIAM NEWMARCH. 

An industrious and substantial farmer of Eden township, Clinton county, 
is William Newmarch, who owes his birth and kindred to the great, historic 
and romantic "merrie isle," our sister country across the deep and dark blue 
Atlantic. He is English by birth and descent and is the possessor of the many 
sterling characteristics commonly attributed to the people of that country. 
By adoption he is an xA.merican citizen, sturdy and progressive, whose life of 
nearly a quarter of a century in this locality has won him the respect of his 
neighbors and an excellent landed property. 

Mr. Newmarch was born on November 30, 1848, in Lincolnshire, Eng- 
land, and he is the son of George and Susanna Newmarch, both born, reared 
and educated in England, and they spent their lives in their home country. 
The father was born on April i, 1824, and his death occurred on June i, 1898; 
the mother was born on May 10, 1819, and died December 9, 1896. They were 
the parents of seven children, namely: Mar}^ born April 9. 1847: William, of 
this review; Charles, born August 25, 1850; Susanna, born February 20, 185 1 ; 
Eliza, born December 16, 1853; George, born February 18, 1856. They are 
all living except George. 

William Newmarch grew to maturity in his native land and was educated 
there. When a young man he conceived the idea of making his home in 
America, having heard of the excellent opportunities that are open to every 
one here, and accordingly he emigrated to our shores in 1886, reaching here 
in June of that year, coming to Low Moor, Clinton county, Iowa, where he 
remained two months, then located in Elvira, where he remained six years; 
he then moved to Goose Lake, where he remained three years, then moved 
back to Eden township and lived upon the farm owned by Ben Dannett, for 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 9 II 

six years. Then in 1900 Mr. Newmarch purchased the Humphrey Bowhers 
farm of two hundred and thirty-four acres, lying in a fertile section of the 
county west of Low Moor two miles, and he has since resided here. He has 
engaged in general farming and stock raising in a manner that indicates that 
he is a gentleman of good judgment and management, and he has laid by a 
competency for his old age, having one of the best farms in the tow^iship in 
every respect. He keeps some excellent live stock of various kinds, which, 
owing to their excellent ciuality, find a very ready market when he ofifers them 
for sale. He feeds for the market each year. He has an attractive and 
pleasant home and he built a large and convenient barn and has added many 
other modern improvements on his farm. 

Mr. Newmarch takes much interest in the affairs of his community and 
he has been school director and president of the local school board for a period 
of three years, w^hich position he filled very creditably and acceptably. Fra- 
ternally, he belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He and his 
wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which he is a trustee 
and steward and a liberal supporter of the same. 

]\Ir. Newmarch was married in November, 1861, to Betsy Hack ford, 
daughter of William and Elizabeth Hackford, natives of England. Her 
death occurred on January 15, 191 1, and she was buried in the cemetery at 
Camanche. She was highly respected and her funeral was attended by the 
lodges of Odd Fellows and Rebekahs as a mark of esteem. 

Mrs. Newmarch's parents had eight children, of whom three are living. 
The mother is living in England, having attained the remarkable age of ninety- 
two years. Seven children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Newmarch, of 
whom three are living, namely: Walter, born on September 18, 1873, married 
Jemima Pearson and they have five children, Lester, Clarence, Bernett, 
William and Mabel. Walter Newmarch lives upon his farm of one hundred 
and sixty acres near Malone, this county. Fannie Newmarch, born March i, 
1886, is the wife of H. W. Galitz, of South Dakota, and they are the parents 
of four children, William F., Vera G., Alice and Fern. George William New- 
march, born September 22, 1887, manages his father's farm. The deceased 
children are Eliza Ann, born March 29, 1871 ; John W., born September 10, 
1872; Anther, born July 29, 1882, and May, born May 23, 1890, all of whom 
died when young. 

The parents of these children moved to Low Moor in 1907. where they 
bought a good and cozy home and are now living retired, surrounded by 
plenty as a result of their former years of industry and economy. They are 
highly respected and have a host of warm personal friends, owing to the fact 
that they have lived upright and kindly lives. 



912 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

JUDGE PATRICK B. WOLFE. 

The present review is concerned with the life of a man whose character 
and abihtv are. by reason of his long and honorable connection with the 
practice of law, well known to the people of Clinton county and of the state 
of Iowa, and whose extensive familiarity with his own county made him 
especially fitted to serve as editor-in-chief of the histoiy of Clinton county. 

Patrick B. Wolfe was born in Chicago, Illinois, on October 7, 1848, the 
son of John R. and Honora (Buckley) Wolfe. John R. Wolfe was born in 
county Kerry. Ireland, in 1824, the son of Richard Wolfe, who was the agent 
having charge of the property of the Knight of Kerry. He received an ex- 
cellent education. During his young manhood he helped to organize the 
"Young Ireland" party. He left Ireland in 1848, coming to America, first 
locating at Ottawa, Illinois. Here he remained on a farm until 1854, when 
he moved to Clinton county, Iowa, to land near Lost Nation, which he had 
entered the winter before, and lived there until his death in 1885, becoming 
one of the largest landholders and most successful farmers of his township. 
Mr. Wolfe did not take any great interest in politics. He was opposed to 
slavery. In religion he and his entire family 'were stanch Catholics, and active 
workers in the church. 

John R. Wolfe was married in Ireland to Honora Buckley. She was a 
member of a family prominent in the church and at the bar, Michael Buckley, 
her brother, having been the leader of the Belfast bar for many years. The 
Wolfe family were also prominent in the church and in law, so that it was 
natural for the American descendants to turn to the bar in choice of a pro- 
fession. Mrs. Wolfe died in 1888. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wolfe were the parents of ten children, two of 
whom died in infancy, and those who grew to maturity are the following: 
James, a farmer near Lost Nation; Patrick B. ; Johanna, who is now Sister 
Scholastica of the Order of Sisters of Mercy at Sioux City, Iowa; John, a 
farmer at Melrose, Monroe county, Iowa; Maurice, a farmer near Lost Na- 
tion ; Margaret, now the wife of Dr. D. Langan, of Clinton ; Katherine, the 
widow of Judge T. D. Fitzgerald, of Montana, at one time president of the 
Montana Senate, nov,- living in Clinton; and Richard B., an attorney at De 
Witt. Clinton county, Iowa. 

Patrick B. Wolfe attended the common schools of Liberty township, 
Clinton county, for a time, then spent one year in the Christian Brothers 
Academy at La Salle. Illinois. He was a student in the academic department 
of Iowa State University for two years, then took a full law course from that 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 9I3 

institution, graduating with the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1870. 
In January, 1871, he began the practice of law at De Witt, Clinton county, 
Iowa, and for a few years suffered the proverbial hardships of the young 
lawyer, but soon came into an extensive practice. In 1877 he formed a part- 
nership with W. A. Cotton, under the name of Cotton & Wolfe, which con- 
tinued until 1888. For four }-ears he served as attorney for the town of De 
Witt, and was a member of the De Witt school board for fifteen years. In 
1885 he was elected to the Iowa Senate, and served three sessions, resigning 
from his position in October. 1891, when he was appointed judge of the dis- 
trict court for the seventh judicial district, holding his first term of court in 
November of 1891. He served on the bench until September i, 1904, when 
he resigned to form a partnership in the practice of law with his son. It is a 
unique fact that Judge Wolfe has resigned from every public office which he 
has held. In 1899 he was nominated for judge of the supreme court of the 
state of Iowa, and was defeated by a close margin. He is again a candidate 
in 1910. His law office was moved from De Witt to Clinton in May, 1891, 
and his residence was transferred in 1893. ]\Ir. Wolfe was a member of the 
public library board of the city of Clinton. 

Mr. Wolfe was married on May i, 1878, to Margaret Connole, the 
daughter of Thomas and Hannah (Malone) Connole, who came from Ire- 
land and located in De Witt. To this union three children were born. John 
L. Wolfe was born in 1879; graduated from the Clinton high school; took 
the classical course at St. Mary's College in Kansas, graduating with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts; took a post-graduate course in Georgetown Uni- 
versity, Washington, D. C, receiving there his Master of x\rts degree, and 
then took the law course there, and received the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 
He spent a year in the University of Berlin, Germany, and in 1904 entered 
into partnership with his father. He is now serving on his second term as 
a representative in the lower house of the Iowa General Assembly. Mary 
Wolfe was born on June 2/, 1881, and is a graduate of Sinsiniwa College, 
of Wisconsin, and Trinity College, in Washington. D. C. One child died 
in infancy. 



FRANK SLAPNICKA. 

Although Frank Slapnicka, a farmer of the vicinity of Low Moor, Eden 
township, Clinton county, was born in Bohemia, he is not a "bohemian'' as the 

(58) 



914 CLINTON COUNTYj IOWA. 

word is frequently used in America, meaning primarily an idler, dreamer, easy- 
going fellow, for he has shown by his life of persistent industry that he is a 
man who believes in doing things and in doing them well ; he has left nothing 
undone whereby he might advance his interests and that of his family and 
therefore he has succeeded, and now has a good farm and comfortable home. 

Mr. Slapnicka's birth occurred on November 11, 1867, in Bohemia, as 
stated above, and he is the son of Antone and Barbara Slapnicka, who came 
to America with their five children in 1868, locating in Stevenson county, 
Illinois. The father was a carpenter and cabinetmaker by trade and he worked 
at the same after coming to this country. In 1870 he moved to Jackson 
county, Iowa. In 1887 ^^^ located in Woodberry county and there spent the 
remainder of his days, dying in December, 1892, at the age of seventy-seven 
years. The mother survived him ten years, dying in June, 1902. They were 
members of the Catholic church, and their family consisted of seven children, 
of whom four are living, namely : Nolbert, of North Dakota ; Josephine is the 
wife of John Scherer, living in Illinois; Rosa is the wife of W. B. Potter, of 
North Dakota, and Frank, of this review ; the deceased are, Agnes, who died 
young; Rudolph, who died in January, 1883, at the age of thirty-two years; 
John, who died in January, 1893, ^^ the age of thirty-three years. 

Frank Slapnicka was thrown on his own resources when veiy young, in 
fact, he started out in life for himself at the age of eleven years, and for eigh- 
teen years he worked as a farm hand. This early experience, although not 
altogether pleasant, was good discipline and he was economical, saved his 
money and at the age of twenty-eight he was enabled to buy a farm of one 
hundred and sixty acres at forty-two dollars per acre. He has prospered by 
reason of good management and has added to his original purchase until he 
now owns an excellent farm of two hundred and eighty acres, which he has 
placed under excellent improvements. In 1907 and 1908 he built a modern, 
spacious and attractive residence and substantial and convenient barn, the 
latter being one of the best in the county, in fact everything about his place 
shows thrift and good management. He carries on general farming on an 
extensive scale and devotes a great deal of time to his live stock, of which 
he keeps a good grade of all kinds. He is conservative, painstaking, plans 
well and is careful to execute his plans in a manner that will bring the re- 
sults sought. He is certainly deserving of much credit for the ample com- 
petency he has acquired, considering the discouraging situations that faced 
him in his youth. He is one of the substantial and leading citizens of Eden 
township. 

Mr, Slapnicka was married on March 24, 1897, to Louisa B. Pelham, 
daughter of Cyrenus and Charlotte Pelham, of this county, Mr. Pelham hav- 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 915 

ing come to Clinton county with his parents in the early settlement of the same, 
and he is a well known and successful citizen. Mr. Pelham's family consists 
of five children, of whom four are living, namely: Roy, of DeWitt, Iowa; 
Orie, wife of C. Toba, of Scott county, Iowa; Deane. living in this county; 
Elmer, deceased, and Louise B.. wife of Mr. Slapnicka. . Mr. Pelham is a 
member of the Masonic order. His wife is also still living. 

Mr. and Mrs. Slapnicka began their married life on their present farm. 
They are the parents of four children: Rose L.. born April 29, 1898; Alay- 
nard, born February 4, 1901 ; Margery, born January 2, 1904; Marion, born 
October 6, 1907. 



CORNELIUS H. PELHAM. 

Each community has its own special individuality that gives strength of 
character and builds for it a historical superstructure that makes the written 
pages of record interesting and stamps the people who come into the public 
notice with a peculiar place in the epochs of every-day transactions. 

Cornelius H. Pelham was born at Malone. Clinton county, Iowa, July 30, 
1874, and is the son of Henr\^ P. and Margaret (Dawson) Pelham. His 
father came to this county in 1855 from Xew York state, of which they were 
natives. 

The father's paternal great-grandfather was of English descent and once 
owned a portion of land where New York city now stands. His career was 
brought to an untimely end by being killed in the Revolutionary war while 
protecting his property, he receiving seven bullets in his body at the hands of 
British soldiers. The father's grandparent, Henry Pelham, was married to 
Margaret Gray, a descendant of the Pilgrim fathers, who located on a farm 
in Greene county, New York. He died January 23, 1843, 'i"'^^ ^^'^^ survived 
by eight children, four sons and four daughters. Cynenus Pelham, the grand- 
father of the subject, was l^orn in that county. February 2, 1790, being one 
of eight children all of whom lived to be over eighty years old. In early life 
he was one who had the privilege of seeing the first steamboat on the Hudson 
river. The grandfather married Melinda Stratton, of Delaware county. New 
York, and came to Lyons and Clinton county, Iowa, in 1855, the year Clinton 
was laid out. In 1857 he purchased land in Eden township which he improved, 
making this his home. He died in 1890, at the age of eighty-three. The 
deatli of his wife occurred in 1871, at the age of sixty-five years. 



gi6 CLINTON. COUNTY, .IOWA. 

■ The father was seventeen years old when he came to this country and 
worked on the farm. He graduated in the common schools and was married 
October 19, 1873. to Mrs. Margaret Gibson, who was twice married and by 
her first marriage had two daughters, Eva M., wife of M. Dann, and Nellie, 
wife of Thomas Clement. By her second marriage she has become the mother 
of four children, Cornelius, Jay W., Rolla E. and Bruce L., all living. Mrs. 
Pelham died on July 17, 1901, and was buried at Cherry wood cemetery. His 
father is at present living on the farm, sixty acres of which w^as his first pur- 
chase. He has three hundred and eighty acres of well improved land, which 
under his industry and able management has become one of the best farms in 
that vicinity. 

Politically, Mr. Pelham was a Republican and cast his first vote for 
Lincoln for President. He filled acceptably the offices of justice of the peace 
and township clerk and was a member of the school board for twenty-five 
years, showing that the people had confidence in him as an educational worker. 

Cornelius Pelham received a common school education and was united 
in marriage to Daisy D. Duke, daughter of Mathew and Rebecca Duke, of this 
county, on October 27, 1887. Mr. Duke w-as a farmer, being, one of the 
pioneers of this county. He was well known and noted as a public spirited 
citizen. He was the father of five children, namely : Lucy, Ida, George, Daisy 
and Arthur. Two children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Pelham : Arthur, on 
the 26th of October, 1899, and Nyrol, born June 18, 1908. Mr. Pelham be- 
longs to the Baptist church and his wife affiliates with the Congregational. 
Politically he is a Republican. 

As was the case with others. Cornelius Pelham was obliged to begin mar- 
ried life on a rented farm, but after years of toil and successful management 
he moved, on his present farm of one hundred and twenty acres on section 
17. Eden township, devoting his attention to agricultural pursuits and stock 
raising in which he is very successful. 



PEDER INGEBRIGTHSEN. 

The subject of this sketch stands in the front rank of successful men 
in his township, having worked his own Way to this position. The time and 
labor spent on his farm have proportionately rewarded him, until now he can 
spend the remainder of his life surrounded by substantial comforts, enjoying 
the confidence, respect and esteem of those who know him. 




MR. AND MRS. PEDER INGEBRIGTHSEN 



ir NKW "WB.K' j 

t..%J LIBiURY I 



Till) EN FO; 
R 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 917 

- ■ Peder Ingebrigthsen was born near Bergen, Norway, June i6, 1850, son 
of Ingebr.igth and Anna (Petersen) Ingebrigthsen. His father died in 
Norway, and his wife and family came to CHnton county, Iowa, about 1888 
and she died at the age of eighty-six, in 1910, in Minnesota and was buried 
near Truman, that state. Peder was one of a family of nine, seven of whom 
are living. His father and the entire family were members of the Lutheran 
church. Peder grew up on a farm in Norway, and was there educated. He 
came to Clinton county, July 4, 1869, and began farming, buying one hundred 
twenty acres in Olive township, to which he has since added forty more. He 
has spent his life in general farming and stock raising, and was well rewarded 
for the application which he showed. In 1906 he came to Grand Mound and 
built a fine, handsome residence, one of the most modern and best in the town. 
Here he has since lived retired. In politics he is a Republican, and was for 
one term of three years trustee of his township. He and his family are 
Lutherans. He was also president for nine years in Olive township and 
served on the school board for fourteen years. 

Mr. Ingebrigthsen was married on March 25, 1875, to Anna H. Mal- 
manger, who was born in Norway, daughter of Hans T. and Inger (John- 
son) Malmanger, who came to Clinton county in i860, and died there. To 
their union have been born nine children : Annie, wife of Albin Westland, 
of Davenport; Hans, deceased; Ingelena, wife of C. Nelson, of Olive town- 
ship, living on his father-in-law's farm ; Hans, a graduate of Luther Academy, 
Albert Lea, Minnesota, and a student of Ames College, Iowa, where he is 
still attending; Irene, wife of John Wagner, of Olive township, a farmer; 
Trena. wife of Bryngel Oleson, of Albert Lea, Minnesota, teacher in the 
commercial department of Luther Academy ; Peder, deceased ; one who died 
in infancy; and Grace, at home, still attending school at Grand Mound. 

Peder Ingebrigthsen is a man who has many friends, and is especially 
popular among those of his own nationality. He is a man of strong and 
sterling character. 



GEORGE P. KISTNER. 

The old Keystone state has sent many of its best and most enterprising 
citizens into the newer western states and, as a rule, they hive performd a 
very commendable work in transforming the raw country into districts of 
prosperity and beauty, for they are by nature people of industry, coming from 



91 8 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

thrifty ancestors — the type that forms the bone and sinew of our republic — 
and they are regarded as most welcomed newcomers wherever they settle. 
One such is George P. Kistner, a prosperous farmer of Eden township, Clin- 
ton county, Iowa. He was born in Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, July 15, 

1849, and he is the son of Charles and Hannah (Ulsh) Kistner, the father 
born in Berks county, Pennsylvania, in 1821 and resided there until 1842, when 
he moved to Lycoming county and there he was married in 1845. I" June, 

1850. he crossed the Mississippi river at Camanche, and the same year he pur- 
chased a tract of land, one hundred and sixty acres, in Eden township, then 
returned to Pennsylvania, where he remained two years. Mr. Kistner was a 
carpenter by trade, which he followed prior to and for some years after com- 
ing to Iowa. In 1857 he built a dwelling and outbuildings upon his land here 
and moved upon the same, on which he resided until 1870 when he moved to 
Low Moor and engaged in the general mercantile business for a number of 
years. He then moved to Louisiana and engaged in the hotel business. 
While on a visit to his daughter in Kansas City, Missouri, he was taken ill 
and died there, having attained the advanced age of eighty-seven years, his 
wife having died previously in Louisiana at the age of eighty-two years. 
They were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. The elder Kistner 
built the first school house in Eden township in 1856. He was a Republican 
in politics. His home was in the path of the famous cyclone of June 3, i860, 
and his house on his farm was completely demolished, but none of the family 
were seriously hurt. A babe, four days old, that was lying on a pillow, was 
blown into the yard, and found a few hours later, asleep on the pillow under 
a pile of debris, not even wet by the heavy rain that followed the wind. The 
first floor was left resting on the foundation, but the balance of the house was 
gone and a horse was discovered walking around in the cellar, under the floor. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kistner were the parents of seven children, namely : 
Mary C, widow of William Cary ; Emmaline C, deceased, was Mrs. John Van 
Epps ; Martin, Charles, Benjamin (the tornado baby, lived three years after 
and then died with croup), and Nettie; Harry, of Louisiana, is engaged in the 
mercantile business. 

George P. Kistner, of this review, received a good education in the com- 
mon schools and spent two years in school at Mt. Vernon. On January 9, 
1873, he was married in Montgomery, New York, to Alice Fralick, daughter 
of Elisha and Fannie M. (Vrooman) Fralick, who came to Clinton county, 
Iowa, in 1868 and purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land, the present 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Kistner, and since 1874 they have resided on the farm, 
now making their home with Mr. and Mrs. Kistner, having attained the ages 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 919 

of eighty-six and eighty-two years respectively. They are members of the 
Alethodist Episcopal church and have a host of warm friends wherever they 
are known. They are a fine old couple whom tq know is to admire and respect. 

Air. and Mrs. Kistner began their married life in the state of New York 
on her parents' farm, and they came to Clinton county, Iowa, in 1874 and live 
on her father's farm. Mr. Fralick had built a good residence on the same ni 
1886; it was then one of the best farm homes in the county and is still well 
preserved. ^^Ir. Kistner has kept his place well improved and has been very 
successful as a general farmer and stock raiser. He has paid particular atten- 
tion to the breeding and raising of Holstein cattle, and he also runs a dairy 
business, shipping his cream to Davenport where it finds a ver^^ ready market. 
He believes from years of experience that the Holstein cattle are the best for 
dairy purposes. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kistner are both representatives of old settlers of this 
county, the very best people in the county, in fact, and these families have for 
several generations been influential in the life of this community. Mr. and 
Mrs Kistner are highly respected and have a wide circle of friends, both here 
and in the state of Xew York. They are the parents of two children, Nettie 
and Fannie, both living at home; the former taught two terms of school in 
Dakota very acceptably. 



DANIEL THOMPSON. 

A native of Canada, our sister nation, the young giantess of the north, 
of wondrous resources, whose wheatfields, mines and lumber camps have 
drawn to her many of the strongest and most courageous of our citizens, but 
who in return has sent to us many of her own best blood, men who were fitted 
to cope with all situations of life, of whom the man whose name appears above 
and who fills a highly responsible position with one of the large manufacturing 
plants of the city, is an eloquent example. 

Daniel Thompson was born in Canada, August 12, 185 1, the son of 
Donald and Mary (Mclntyre) Thompson, native Canadians of Scotch descent. 
His father was a farmer and there lived and died. Of his ten children, five 
are living. Daniel received his education in the Canada public schools and in 
a commercial college. He came to the United States in 1870 and located in 
Michigan, where he took up bookkeeping. He continued that for two years, 
then went on the road for a time, later entering the hardware business in Mich- 
igan. He was engaged in this until 1895, ^^''^^ then entered the manufacture 



920 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

of harness at Chicago. About five years later, on July i, 1900, he came to 
Clinton, bought stock in the Clinton Saddlery Company, and was elected to 
the position of secretary-treasurer, which he still holds. Of this company C. 
F. Curtis is president; C. F. Alden was vice-president until July 14, 1910, 
when C. E. Goltman was elected to that position. 

The plant is located at No. 901 South Third street, and has grown in 
size enormously. At present it employs from seventy-five to one hundred men. 
It manufactures harness and does a general jobbing business. At present its 
shipping covers a territory extending over New" York, Indiana, Michigan, 
Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Dakota, Wisconsin, Nebraska, Kansas and Missouri. 
When Mr. Thompson came here the factory employed, only fifteen to twenty- 
five men and the volume of business has since then more than quadrupled. 
Much of this increase has been due to the efforts and attention which Mr. 
Thompson has given the business. Prospects for the continued increase of 
operations and for the future growth of the plant are good. Mr. Thompson 
gives his attention to his work to the exclusion of outside interests. In politics 
he is a Republican, and held various municipal offices in Ovid, Michigan. He 
is a member of the Masonic fraternity. 

Mr. Thompson was married on June 10, 1870, to Sarah Erb, a native of 
Canada, and three children have been born to them. Frank is in the factory 
with his father; Minnie lives in Minneapolis," and Edna is teaching mathe- 
matics in the Monmouth high school at Monmouth, Illinois. 

Mr. Thompson's valuable traits of character have won for him the friend- 
ship and esteem of many. He is a thoroughly equipped business man, well 
fitted for positions of responsibility and management, having proved his capa- 
bility in these lines. 



B. H. A. HENNINGSEN. 

B. H. A. Henningsen was born in Schleswig, Germany, November 5, 
1826, the only son of Peter C. and Louise (Jessen) Henningsen; his mother 
died when he was only five years old. He received an excellent education 
in the schools of his native town and later studied law at Heidelberg and 
Kiel. He was within two months of taking his degree at the latter univer- 
sity when the troubles of 1848 broke out; the duchies of Schleswig and 
Holstein declared their independence of Denmark and proclaimed a provi- 
sional government, the population flew to arms, and almost the entire student 
body deserted the university to join the forces in the field. Only a few weeks 




B . H . /^ .HENNiriGSKN 



THE KRV/ YORK 

PUBLIC LIBilARY 



ASTOR, LENOX, ANT) 

TiLDEN FOUNDATIONS 

ft L 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 92 1 

later the whole Student Corps, as it was called, was taken captive by the Danes, 
in the engagement at Bau, and carried to Copenhagen as prisoners of war. 
After seven months they were exchanged and Mr. Henningsen at once re- 
entered the service, later winning his commission as lieutenant for bravery in 
action. The struggle dragged on through the years 1849-50, until Prussia 
and Austria intervened and forced the duchies to a humiliating submission ; 
in consequence of this, thousands of the inhabitants chose voluntary exile 
from their native land, the greater number emigrating to the United States, 
where they furnished a valuable element in the German population, being gen- 
erally recognized as examples of thrift, industry and integrity. A large 
colony had settled in Davenport and through Scott county, and this drew 
many others to Iowa. 

Mr. Henningsen came to America in 1852. in company with a young 
cousin, August Henningsen, and settled on a farm near Sabula, Jackson 
county, of which they became joint owners; here also he was married, in 
1853, to Elwine Schroeder, the affianced bride who had followed him from 
the old country. There followed a dozen years of pioneer struggle and 
hardship until, having sufficiently familiarized himself with the laws and 
language of the country, Mr. Henningsen resolved to make his education tell 
in lines more congenial to his ability, and at the close of 1864 he established 
himself in Sabula as a notary public and conveyancer. The following year he 
came to Lyons, succeeding the well known F. G. Heinrich in business ; he was 
at once appointed justice of the peace and served as such for twelve years. 
He was also for several years a riiember of the city council. Squire Hen- 
ningsen, as he was then universally called, soon won a wide acquaintance, 
and became perhaps the most trusted adviser of the Germans of Clinton 
county. He was especially sought in probate matters, settling a large number 
of estates with entire satisfaction to all concerned. His wise administration 
of justice is well characterized by the following anecdote: Two quarrelsome 
neighbors, having fallen out over some trifle, threatened to take the law to 
each other: 'T'll go to Squire Henningsen about this," said one. ''No, not 
to him," replied the other, "for he'll only give us a good talking to, and tell 
us to go home and behave ourselves." 

In 1877, M^- Henningsen was elected county treasurer and served four 
terms with great acceptability; then he was for a. time president of the Mer- 
chants' National Bank,, of Clinton, and still later rcropened his office at Lyons, 
continuing active along his original lines of business until his sudden death, 
on May 14, 1909, in. his eighty-third year. He was widely mourned in the 
community of which he had so long been an honored and useful citizen. 



922 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

Mr. Henningsen was always identified with the Democratic party, but in 
his later years took no active part in politics ; he never joined any lodge or 
fraternal organization, his sole membership being in the German Association, 
of Lyons, of which he was president for a number of years. 

Mr. Henningsen's wife died in 1893, and the surviving members of his 
immediate family are his four daughters, Louise D. and Henriette E., at 
home, and Mrs. W. K. Boardman, of Nevada, Iowa, and Mrs. F. C. Brayton, 
of Lyons. 



CHARLES W. BEEBY. 

There could be no more comprehensive history of a city or county or even 
a state and its people than that which deals with the life work of those who 
by their own endeavors and indomitable energy have placed themselves where 
they well deserve the title of "progressive," and in this sketch will be found the 
record of one who has outstripped the less active plodders on the highway of 
life, one who has not been subdued by the many obstacles and failures that 
come to every one, but who has made them stepping-stones to higher things 
and at the same time that he was winning his way in the industrial affairs of 
life gained a reputation for uprightness and honor. 

The above paragraph was suggested by contemplating the eminently 
useful, unusually active and altogether praiseworthy career of Charles W. 
Beeby, one of the best known men in financial, industrial and social circles in 
this part of Clinton county. He is mayor of the town of Charlotte, president 
of the Charlotte Savings Bank, extensive agriculturist and stock-feeder and 
shipper and candidate for state senator on the Republican ticket in 1910. A 
broad-minded, public spirited, able, energetic man of the people, whom to 
know is to respect and admire. 

Mr. Beeby was born near Charlotte, Clinton county, Iowa, on February 
13, 1864, was reared to farm pursuits and educated in the public schools and 
a business college, receiving a good education. He is the son of Daniel and 
Permina (Reed) Beeby. The father was a native of England and the mother 
of Iowa. They were married at De Witt, Clinton county, Iowa, and came to 
this county in the spring of 1855. He was born on January 26, 1822, and in 
the old country was a tradesman. Upon coming to Clinton county, Iowa, 
he bought one hundred and sixty acres of land, which had a small amount of 
poor improvements. He remained there until all his children were born and 
engaged very successfully in general farming and stock raising. He made 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 923 

extensive improvements on this farm and added to his lands until he had seven 
hundred and fifty acres. In politics he was a Republican, but never aspired to 
office. He gave his own business all his attention. He was reared in the 
church of England, from which he never departed. He underwent many 
deprivations and hardships in helping to settle and build up the county. When 
he came to this locality it was sparsely settled, and there was an abundance of 
game, wild beasts roaming at will. He was among the very early settlers and 
was one of the influential men of his time, and is worthy of an honorable 
place in the history of Clinton county. He continued on the farm until 1897 
when he retired from active farming and spent his declining years at Charlotte. 
He was widely known among all the old settlers and was highly respected, his 
integrity and honor being above reproach. He died on February 2, 1908, his 
wife having preceded him, dying on the 22nd of February, 1900. She was 
the daughter of Paul and Nancy (Fen) Reed, both of Pennsylvania, and they 
came to the vicinity of Gabena, Missouri, about 1850. The father died at 
Hanover, Illinois. His wife came to Clinton county, Iowa, and bought a 
small farm, and kept the family together, rearing them in credit and respecta- 
bility. 

Charles Beeby, brother of the father of the subject, came here before the 
father came and bought land in this neighborhood, improved a farm and after 
a number of years sold out and moved to Dakota. He was among the first 
to settle here and was a great factor in getting the country settled up with 
good men, most of whom came to him, and he would help them hunt their 
land, doing all he could to get them settled. He had money and the needy 
who came to him were always helped. He took no note and no security, and 
when they were ready to return the money no questions were asked. He was 
one of the first settlers in southeastern Dakota, where he farmed until his re- 
tirement from active life, and he died in northern Iowa, at Akron. He was not 
an aspirant for office at any time. The father of the subject was a Republican, 
and he was a member of the United Workmen. His children were as follows : 
Charles W., the subject; Sylvester, a farmer, who died September 17, 1904, 
leaving two children; Francis T., a farmer and stockman, died April 30, 1900, 
a single man; Harry E., a farmer and stockman, buys and ships fat stock, and 
now resides at Charlotte; Alice, Mrs. Joseph Yando, lives on a farm; John 
died young, 

Charles W. Beeby, of this review, was reared in this vicinity and remained 
under the paternal roof until twenty-one years old, then engaged in farming 
for himself. He continued general farming, and raised and bought cattle for 
the market and shipped to Chicago, being very successful in his dealings. 



924' CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

He yet maintains two large farms. On March i, 1904, he came to Charlotte 
and built a commodious residence, which he sold and built another fine modern 
two-story frame house, situated on a natural elevated site, overlooking the 
town, where he has a most handsome residence. For many years he has been 
buying and shipping fat stock at all seasons of the year in large numbers, and is 
assisting the people of the county in furnishing the markets with their stock. 
He pays current prices and they are satisfied. He assisted in the organization of 
the Charlotte Savings Bank, with fifty thousand dollars capital, and was made 
a director thereof, in 1900 was elected president, and again in 1908 was made 
president. The bank has been a pronounced success, being owned and man- 
aged by substantial business men, and the depositors have the utmost confidence 
in the management, it being known among the very solid institutions of Clin- 
ton county. It is a bank of deposit and discount, and does a very large gen- 
eral banking business as well, also buys and sells exchange. 

Mr. Beeby is a Republican and uses his influence for the party and as a 
reward for the efforts he has put forth in his party's behalf he was given, by 
the party leaders, without solicitation, the nomination for state senator in the 
fall of 19 10. He has never been an aspirant for ojffice, but has always been 
interested in public affairs. 

Fraternally, Mr. Beeby is a member of the Knights of Pythias, Modern 
Woodmen and Modern Brotherhood of America. He is a enterprising and 
public spirited citizen, ready to help build up Charlotte and the country at 
large. 

Mr. Beeby w-as married on February 2, 1892, to Louisa Denoma, who 
was born in Clinton county in March, 1862, a lady of intelligence and culture, 
a daughter of Joseph and Angeline Roberts Denoma, of Canada, who came to 
this county in 1852, the father becoming a prominent farmer and stock raiser. 
The father, who died in March, 18851 was a Catholic. His wife died in 1890. 
The following children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Denoma : Joseph, a farmer; 
Anthony, a farmer, stock raiser and merchant ; Ocdabo, a farmer ; John, a 
farmer; Adeline, Mrs. Faver; Philemon, Mrs. Burnitt ; Sarah, Mrs. J. Thomp- 
son ; Louisa, wife of the subject of this sketch ; Emma, Mrs. J. Gray ; Eugenia, 
Mrs. Jen Sorsen. 

No children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Beeby. Religiously, Mrs. 
Beebv is a Catholic, which faith she was reared in. 



CLAUS KRUSE. 



Among the many thrifty and enterprising citizens of Clinton county who 
have come to us from the great German empire, benefitting alike themselves 





MR. AND MRS. CLAUS KRUSE 



THE i^EW YiOEK 
PUBLIC LIBllARY 



A^TOIl, LENOX, ANT) 

TILDEN FOUNDATIONS 

R L 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 925 

and us, is Clans Kruse. extensive farmer and stock raiser in the vicinity of 
Goose Lake, a man who is in every way deserving of the large success he can 
claim. 

Mr. Kruse was born near Kiel, province of Holstein, Germany, August 
20. 1835, and was reared on a farm and educated in his native country. He 
is the son of Paul and Margaret (Shombarger) Kruse, both of the same prov- 
ince in Germany. The father was a farmer and speculator, a very progressive 
man, and came to America in 1853. Emigrating to Iowa, he first located at 
Davenport, where he remained two years and found employment in a brick 
yard and in burning lime. At the expiration of the period indicated, he came 
to Clinton county, bought a small tract of land and improved and cultivated 
it, later adding to it until he had one hundred and sixty acres. He carried on 
general farming, raised and fed stock in a small way and was successful. He 
gave all his attention to his farm and its products. He was a Democrat, but 
never aspired to ofiice, and was a consistent member of the Lutheran church. 
He became well known and was highly respected, his integrity and honor being 
above reproach. He died in his eightieth year; his wife preceded him in 
death at the age of seventy years. Ten children blessed his marriage : Claus, 
of this review, being the sixth child. Four are yet living, viz : Joseph, a farmer 
in this township; Peter runs a lumber yard at Goose Lake; Margaret, wife of 
Peter Hagge. of Goose Lake ; Claus, of this review. 

The subject remained at home and assisted his father until he married, 
in 1862, then settled on his eighty-acre tract of land, erected a small house and 
began work. He had sold his inheritance from his father, forty acres of 
land, to his brother and bought the eighty-acre tract. He has been increasing 
his lands ever since and he yet holds the original eighty-acre tract, and now 
owns over sixteen hundred acres of the finest land in Deep Creek township, 
most of which is well improved farms, which he rents. His son manages the 
home farm. He has done general farming, and raised and fed stock which 
he markets, and his sons are carrying forward the work he inaugurated. He 
is very successful. He also invested in bank stock in the Goose Lake Bank, 
and has some vacant lots in Goose Lake. He has made good investments in 
all his operations and is among the more prominent and financially strong 
citizens of Deep Creek township. He has retired from active operations and 
turned over to his sons the management of his extensive farms. He and his 
wife are in the full enjoyment of a well spent life. He is widely known and 
has the confidence and respect of all that know him. He was brought up in 
the Lutheran church, from which faith he has never departed. 

Mr. Kruse married Catherina Petersen, who was born in the province 



926 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

of Schleswig, Germany, in April, 1841, a daughter of Hans and Catherina 
(Neave) Petersen, both of Germany. The father was a farmer, and in 1857, 
shortly before the death of the mother, which occurred in Germany, the wife 
of the subject, one brother and one sister, came to America, and in 1867 the 
father came to this country and joined his children, all settling in Clinton 
county, Iowa. The father found a good home with his daughter, Mrs. 
Kruse, where he died in March, 1884. He was a good farmer in the 
old country and was proud of the choice of his children who came to America. 
Four children were in his family, the wife of the subject being the third in 
order of birth. Mrs. Kruse died on April 6, 191 1, and was buried in Ingwer- 
sen cemetery. 

There have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Kruse ten children, namely: 
Henry, now helping to run the home farm, a good financier, and stockholder 
and president of the Goose Lake Bank; Adolph is also on the home place; 
Emma, Mrs. Peter Peterson; Lena, wife of Paul Martinsen, a farmer; Aug- 
ust is a prominent farmer in this county ; Ferdinand is also a farmer ; Edward 
and Johannis, neither married and both farmers, live together; Francis, wife 
of John Ploog, a farmer; Alfareida is at home, single. 

Glaus Kruse has proven himself to be a good financier and a very success- 
ful man, entirely self-made, making his start from the forty acres of land 
from his father, and he helped his father in getting the land. He is unpre- 
tentious, never making any great fuss about what he is doing, but quietly look- 
ing out for his own interests and picking up bargains in good lands, working 
hard and making but few mistakes, using good judgment in all transactions, 
and by hard work and honest dealing he has created a large estate. 



BIRT WAUGH. 



Herein is partially recorded the history of a family of honorable and 
worthy men and women, who have taken their share in the development of 
Clinton county. And what more can one do for one's country than the rear- 
ing to manhood and womanhood of twelve strong citizens, as did the father 
of the subject, the wagonmaker of Maquoketa and farmer of Clinton county. 

Birt Waugh was born in Brookfield township, Clinton county, Iowa, on 
January 10, 1875, on the farm which he now owns, the son of EdAvard 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 927 

Fletcher W^augh and Liddy (Smith) ^^'augh. Edward Waugh was born in 
Mercer county. Pennsylvania, April 25, 1833, the son of natives of Ireland, 
who came to Jackson county, Iowa, in an early day where he lived to the age 
of ninety-nine. Edward \\^augh came to Jackson county in 1854, and there 
met his wife, who was born in New York, February 21. 1843, ^^^^^ came to 
Jackson county in i'852. For twelve years ^Ir. Waugh followed the wagon- 
maker's trade in Maquoketa, then, having been set back by the war. in 1866 
he removed to Clinton county and bought one hundred and sixty acres of land, 
to which he afterwards added one hundred and sixty more. Here he lived 
and farmed successfully until 1907. when he returned to Maquoketa, and 
now lives there in retirement. In politics he is a Republican, and has held 
local offices in Brookfield township. He and his wife are members of the 
Methodist church. They were the parents of fifteen children, twelve of 
whom are living: Lester, Vernon Edward, Etta (deceased), Sherman (de- 
ceased), Arthur, Clinton, Gertrude, AUie. Birt, Charles, Anna, Mary (de- 
ceased). Bird, Edward Fletcher and Elbert. 

Birt Waugh grew to manhood on the old farm, and attended the com- 
mon schools and Dixon's Normal College, then engaged in farming, and now 
owns eighty acres of land. He carries on general farming and stock raising, 
and is a breeder of Shorthorn cattle. For about ten years he has been the 
owner of a threshing machine, and spends his summers largely in the Avork of 
threshing. He and his family are members of the Methodist church. On 
January 17, 1905, he was married to Martha Richie, who was born on April 
26, 1884, in Liberty township, Clinton county, the daughter of C. E. and Ella 
(Calkins) Richie. C. E. Richie came early to Clinton county; here his wife 
died, and he is now living at Toronto, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Waugh are the 
parents of one son. Fay Elsworth, born January 31, 1906. 

Charles W^augh, a brother of Birt, was born on the Waugh homestead on 
June 27, 1877. He attended the public schools, is a farmer, and works eighty 
acres of land, giving special attention to the breeding of Shorthorn cattle and 
Poland China hogs. He is, like all his brothers, a Republican. Fraternally 
he is a member of the Odd Fellows. On October 10, 1906, Charles Waugh 
was married to Celia Vogelsang, of Clinton county, Iowa. Two children 
have been born to them, Thelma and Melvin. 

Edward F. Waugh, another brother, was born on February 27, 1884, 
attended the common schools, and early began farming. He is working 
eighty acres of the homestead, and is also a breeder of Shorthorn cattle, a 
Republican, and an Odd Fellow, like his brothers. He was married on March 
26, 1906, to Hermina Kettlesen. of Clinton county. One child. Vera, has 
been born to them. 



928 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

Another brother, Elbert, works the remaining eighty acres of the home- 
stead. He also is a breeder of Shorthorn cattle. In politics he is a Repub- 
lican. 

The Waiigh brothers are all excellent farmers, and strong, progressive 
young men. They have many friends, and no family in their community is 
more highly respected than the Waughs. 



WILLIAM J. MEVES. 

Among the farmers of Spring Rock township, Clinton county, who are 
deserving of mention in a history of the province of the one at hand is 
William J. Meves, who is a man of well-established principles and who takes 
an interest in the affairs of his community, delighting in witnessing the 
advancement of the same and the success of his neighbors. 

Mr. Meves was born in Berlin township, this county, in 1875, and is the 
son of W. H. and Anna (Graves) Meves, both born in Germany, from which 
country they came to America when children with their parents and the 
mother's people located in Illinois, near Moline, while the father's family 
moved to near Davenport, in Scott county, Iowa. The maternal grandparents 
came to Wheatland, Iowa, about 1880 and there spent the remainder of their 
lives. The paternal grandfather died \vhen his son, W. H., father of the 
subject, was twelve years of age. The latter was thus somewhat handicapped 
in his youth, but he made the most of every discouraging situation and be- 
came self-educated. He devoted his attention to farming when a young man, 
and when the war of the Rebellion broke out, he entered the service of the 
Union, becoming a member of Company A, Eighth Iowa Infantry, in which 
he served, with distinction, until the close of the struggle, being, according 
to his comrades, a most faithful soldier. After the war he returned to Iowa 
and located near De Witt, Clinton county, and there engaged in farming, 
which he continued with much success and satisfaction. His wife came to 
Clinton county in about 1870, her people locating in Berlin township. The 
father of William J. Meves conducted a hotel at Tama City at different times, 
and was once a merchant in Wheatland for many years, but farming has been 
his chief work. He was very successful in \vhatever line he attempted, 
and, having laid by a competency for his old age, he is now living retired, 
making his home at Wheatland, where he has a very pleasant and neat dwell- 
ing. In his family were numbered four children, three of whom are living. 



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PUBLIC LIBUAR^ 
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MRS. FLORINTI MEVES 




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WILLIAM J. MEVES 



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CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 929 

W. H. Meves is a Republican and he and his family affiliate with the German 
Reformed church. 

William J. Meves, of this review, was educated in the schools of Wheat- 
land and he took up farming when a young man and has made this line of 
endeavor his principal life work. He operates one hundred and eighty acres 
west of \Vheatland. which he has kept well improved and which vields 
abundant harvests from vear to vear. He carries on general farmino- and 
handles some good grades of stock. 

Mr. Meves was married in 1901 to Florinti Schneider, who has proved 
to be a most worthy helpmeet, and to this union three children have been 
born, Phyllis, Edwin and Elenora Tenette, the last two being deceased. 

In politics Mr. Meves is a Republican, and fraternally a Modern Wood- 
man of America. 



CORNELIUS PETERSEN. 

As a farmer and stock raiser Cornelius Petersen holds a very high 
rank among those who make these lines of endeavor their life work in Water- 
ford township. He is one of the large number of our enterprising citizens 
who ha\e come from the famous province of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. 
ha\-ing been born near Wick, October 7, 1848. There he spent his boyhood 
and started his education, but his parents brought him to America when he 
was ten years of age and here he finished his schooling. He is a son of 
Marks and Margaret Inga ( Magratha) Petersen, both natix'es of Germany, 
the father of Rippen and the mother of Foehr. They grew to maturity and 
married in the fatherland, making that their place of abode until 1859, 
when they came to America, the voyage requiring eight weeks. They landed 
at New Orleans and went to Mobile, stayed until spring, then went back 
to New Orleans and came by steamboat to Lyons, Clinton county, Iowa, 
first locating in Center township, where they remained one year, then bought 
forty acres of timber land, which the father cleared and improved, adding 
forty acres more four years later, and there he remained until 1873, his wife 
dying on Christmas night of that year. He then rented his farm and moved 
to Clinton, and later returned to his native land, where he married, and 
soon afterwards came back to Iowa, buying a forty acre farm on which he 
settled. He also bought a farm of one hundred and twenty acres near 
Sabula, Iowa. He became very well established in due course of time, be- 
ing a man of industry and a good manager. He bought large tracts of 

(59) 



930 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

land, which he distributed among his children. In 1897 ^^ again returned 
to the fatherland, where his death occurred and where he was buried. He 
was among the prominent and influential farmers of Clinton county, well 
known and accorded the highest respect. He had no children by his last 
marriage. Peter, who was born to the first union, lived on the old homestead 
where he died, leaving three children ; Cornelius, of this review ; Martin, who 
never married, traveled a great deal, spending a great deal of his time in 
the old country, finally disappearing, his whereabouts not being known ; he 
was formerly a merchant of Clinton, Iowa. 

Cornelius Petersen remained under the parental roof, assisting with 
the work on the farm during his youth. He was married on March 18, 1873, 
and settled to farming on the homestead, where he remained two years; 
then in 1875 he purchased ninety acres in section 10. Washington township, 
this county, later adding one hundred and sixty acres adjoining, still later 
adding another survey, thus owning a splendid aggregation of land to the 
amount of four hundred and ninety acres, which he brought up to a high 
state of improvement, and there remained, successfully engaged in general 
farming and stock raising, until 1908, when he bought the B. J. Monahan 
farm, containing three hundred and seventy-three acres adjoining the cor- 
porate limits of Charlotte, which is one of the most elaborately improved 
pnd one of the best farms in Clinton county. He keeps it under a high state 
of cultivation, carrying on general farming and stock raising, buying, feed- 
ing and shipping large numbers, being widely known as a stock man. He 
has solfl a part of his Washington township farm, but yet owns two hundred 
pnd fifty acres of that farm. He has given his attention exclusively to farm- 
ing and stock raising and his efforts have been crowned with abundant suc- 
cess He has a beautiful home, in the midst of attractive surroundings and 
it is known as a place of old-time hospitality to the many friends of the 
family. 

Mr. Petersen is a stanch Democrat in his political relations and he has 
filled, very acceptably, some of the township offices, such as school direc- 
tor, etc.. though he is not an aspirant to public offices, being too busy with 
his large individual affairs • He is a consistent member of the Lutheran 
church and he contributes liberally to the support of the church at Charlotte. 

Mr. Petersen was married to Anna Hansen, who was born in Gemiany, 
November 17, 1851, the daughter of Hans P. and Mary (Ohrms) Hansen, 
both natives of Germany, where they grew to maturity and were married, 
emigrating to America in 1866, coming direct to Lyons, Iowa, where they 
lived a year, later located in Center Grove township and engaged in farm- 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 93 1 

ing. Mr. Hansen becoming well established, owning large tracts of land. 
His death occurred in 1890, his wife having preceded him to the grave in 
1881. They became widely known, prominent and influential. Their chil- 
dren were: Sabina, who first married a Mr. Paulsen. l)y whom she had three 
children, her second husband being N. Holtz. which union resulted in the 
birth of three children ; Peter first married Mary Petersen, and later Lena 
Bolt: August lives in Minnesota: Henry married Mattie Breitholtz and 
her death occurred in 1884: he then married Maggie Bock: Anna, wife of 
the subject. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius Petersen the following children have been 
born: Henry, a retired farmer: Johannis is an agent for Arkansas lands; 
Mark lives on the old homestead ; Adolph is managing the home farm ; Ed- 
ward is at home : August, who is at home, was manager of one of Mr. Peter- 
sen's farms in Arkansas, which has recently been sold; Amanda is the wife 
of the Rev. Carl H. Olsen. pastor of the Charlotte Lutheran church; Malinda 
is still a member of the home circle. 



JAMES B. CLARK. 



We of today owe a world of gratitude to the old pioneers, those hardy 
sons of the soil who did so much for later generations and whose examples 
we should, in many ways, attempt to follow, for they were, as a rule, not only 
sturdv in l)rain and brawn, but in character also, being scrupulously honest 
and hardworking, looking to the general improvement of their communities 
along material, civic and moral lines. Such a man was James B. Clark, long 
since "gathered to his fathers." who vvill long be remembered in Clinton 
county, especially in Maquoketa. w^here he long maintained his home. He 
was born in New Jersey. July 17. 1802. and was the son of Bailey and Mary 
Clark. When a young man he learned the trade of wagonmaker and became 
very expert in this line of work, always finding a demand for his highly skilled 
labor. When a young man he emigrated to Ancaster, Canada, where he mar- 
ried Jane Ware, who was born in Tichiel. England, April 9. 1811. In the 
spring of 1855 the family moved to Maquoketa. Jackson county. Iowa, where 
Mr. Clark died three weeks later of smallpox. A few weeks after that event 
Mrs. Clark purchased a farm of one hundred and twenty acres in Bloomfield 
township. Clinton county, where she made her home until lier death. Eleven 
children were born to this familv. of wb.om nine are living: they were Mrs. 



932 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

Mary A. Wilbur, of Norwich. New York; PVancis, of Delmar, Iowa; Mrs. 
Esther A. Kettle, of Los Angeles, California; William, of Delmar, this county 
(see his individual sketch); Mrs. Elizabeth Older, deceased; Mrs. Jane A. 
Sackrider, deceased ; John N., of Sedalia, Missouri ; Benjamin G., of Indian- 
ola. Iowa : Emma A. has remained single ; Nehemiah, of Flagler, Colorado ; 
Mrs. Hattie L. Rossiter. The mother of these children, who was a faithful 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church, was called to her reward on Febru- 
ary 21, 1892. Francis Clark, mentioned above, purchased one hundred and 
twenty acres adjoining the old Clark homestead in Bloomfield township, of 
which he owned eighty acres. 

John N. Clark, referred to in the preceding paragraphs, proved his loy- 
alty to the Union cause by enlisting in the Federal army in July, 1862, having 
worked hard all day in the harvest field, but he walked to De Witt, Iowa, in 
the evening. Being only eighteen years of age and short of stature, he placed 
pads in the heels of his shoes in order to make the required height. He had 
obtained his mother's consent and became a member of Company F. Twenty- 
sixth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, in which he served gallantly until the close of 
the war, seeing service in some of the hardest engagements during that 
sanguinary struggle. He was never wounded or taken prisoner and no sick- 
ness overtook him. For meritorious service he was promoted to corporal. 

James B. Clark, the immediate subject of this sketch, was a thorough and 
painstaking farmer and he kept his place well improved and made a success of 
whatever he turned his attention to. 



AUGUST KRAMER. 



The Kramer family is one of the thriftiest and best known among the 
German element in the western part of Clinton county, especially Spring 
Rock township, where they maintain well improved farms and comfortable 
and attractive homes, all of which they have made by indomitable energy and 
persistent endeavor along legitimate lines. One of the representative mem- 
bers of this family of the present generation is August Kramer, who was born 
in Illinois on October 2, 1856, the son of Henry and Christina (Sittler) 
Kramer, both born in Germany, from which country they came to America 
in 1852 and located in Adams county. Illinois, as early settlers and there 
they began farming and became well established. In 1864 the family came 
to Lyons, Clinton county, Iowa, where the father conducted a general store 




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CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 933 

during the balance of his life, dying in 1866; his widow survived him thirty- 
seven years, passing to her rest in 1903. She was a woman of most mag- 
nanimous impulses, and was the mother of nine children. She and her fam- 
ily were Lutherans. 

August Kramer, of this review, was educated in German in the schools 
at Lyons, Iowa. He began farming when a boy and has always continued this 
vocation, his efforts having brought him abundant success. In the fall of 
1875 he bought, in connection with his brother-in-law, two hundred and forty 
acres of good land in the northern part of Spring Rock township, this county. 
They farmed in partnership for a period of nine years, then rented a farm of 
the subject's father-in-law for the next ten years, having sold his share of the 
former place. He was a good manager, a hard worker and saved his money, 
and in 1894 he purchased the excellent place which he now makes his place of 
abode, moving here in 1895. He first bought one hundred and sixty acres, 
later one hundred and forty acres on the river. He has brought his land up to 
a high state of cultivation and he carries on general farming in a manner that 
stamps him as being abreast of the times in every particular. He also raises 
and feeds a great deal of stock. Among the substantial improvements w^hich 
are noted on the place which he has made are the excellent barns. He also 
has a neat and very cozy dwelling. 

In the spring of 1885 Mr. Kramer was married to Mary Reedesel, who 
was born in Ohio, on April 14, 1861, from which state she came to Clinton 
county, Iowa, with her parents, who located in Spring Rock township, about 
1869. This family has always ranked high in the communities where they 
have lived. To Mr. and Mrs. Kramer three children have been born, namely : 
Edna Elenora, March 25, 1886; Louise Emielia, December 5, 1888, and Henry 
George. August 25, 1891. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kramer are faithful members of the Reformed church, 
and politically he is a Democrat, but independent in local matters, preferring 
to vote for the man whom he deems most eligible for the office sought. Fra- 
ternally, he is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America. 



EDMUND L. COOK. 



The spirit of a noble and earnest life is that which animates the honored 
subject of this sketch, than whom no man in Clinton county is better known 



934 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

and few occupy as high a place in the esteem and confidence of the pubhc as he. 
His career has been replete with good to his fellow men and now. in the even- 
ing of life, as the shadows lengthen and he proceeds onward toward the twi- 
light of the journey's end. he is cheered by the consciousness of duty well done 
and faithfully performed and the heartfelt desire of his many friends is that 
his days may yet be many in which to bless the world by his presence and 
influence. 

Edmund L. Cook is a native of W'elland county, Ontario, where his birth 
occurred on the 9th day of October, 1830. In 1842. when a lad of twelve 
years, he removed to Clinton county, Iowa, with his parents. Robert and Ruth 
Cook, and settled on the claim of eighty acres in Brookfield township which 
his father purchased of the government. There were not many v.hite people 
at that time in the township, the population of the northern part consisting of 
about eighty people, old and young. White neighbors were few and far be- 
tween. Later, about the year 1854, Mr. Cook drove overland to California, 
making the trip with a single team and a covered wagon and during that and 
the two years ensuing he followed mining, but met with only fair success in 
his search for gold. Returning to Clinton county in 1856, he settled in Brook- 
field township and turned his attention to a surer way of acquiring a fortune in 
agriculture, which, with the breeding and raising of stock, he followed with 
gratifying success until his retirement from active life a short time ago. 
Meanwhile he added to his real estate from time to time until his farm now 
contains three hundred and sixty acres of as fine land as the county of Clinton 
can boast, the soil being deep, fertile and admirably adapted to agriculture and 
pasturage, and the improvements of all kinds being among the best in the 
township. In the prosecution of his labors as a farmer Mr. Cook has always 
been enterprising and progressive and his success has been such as few achieve 
on larger and more pretentious estates. He has succeeded in all his under- 
takings so that in his old age he is well situated financially, having a beautiful 
and attractive home, amply supplied with comfort and conveniences, and a 
fortune of suflicient magnitude to render his future free from care or anxiety. 
Though never a politician, he has kept in touch with the times on all matters 
of public interest, and concerning the great c|uestions and issues before the 
people he has ever had well grounded opinions which have carried weight and 
commanded respect. He has permitted few, if any, to exceed him in his 
efiforts to promote the varied interests of the community, all means for the 
social and moral advancement of his neighbors and fellow citizens enlisting 
his co-operation and support, and throughout a long and busy life he has 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 935 

always been governed Ijy the principles of honor and rectitude which gained 
the confidence of his fellow men and won for him a large place in public favor, 

Mr. Cook was married the first time in 1861 to Emma Wilbereer. ot 
Indiana, who died in 1867, after a brief and happy wedded experience of six 
years duration. On October i6th of the latter year was solemnized his mar- 
riage with Adaline Sparks, whose birth occurred on the 26th of March, 1835, 
and who departed this life August i, 1901. The following are the names of 
the children who constitute the familv of Mr. Cook : E(hnund L., born Aue:- 
ust IT. 1867. is a custom ofiicial in the government service at Washington, 
D. C. ; Ruby A. Hill, born August 8, 1870, is connected with the Savings 
Bank of Elwood. this county; A. L, cashier of tlie Eirst National Bank at 
Lost Nation, who was born June 17. 1873 (see sketch) ; DeLoyd K. Cook, 
whose birth occurred on April 18, 1875, was graduated from Drake Univer- 
sity. Des Moines, in 1898, with the degree of Doctor of Laws, after which he 
received a certificate admitting him to practice in all the state courts, later 
being admitted to the federal courts. He married, on the 21st of December, 
1898. Esther M. McKenzie. who w^as born June 18. 1879, being a daughter 
of Dr. H. M. McKenzie, a prominent physician and representative citizen of 
Elwood; four children have been born to this union, namely; Harold, Ruth, 
Donald and Herbert M., all living. D. K. Cook is not only one of the distin- 
guished lawyers of the state, but has also made his influence felt in political 
circles. ha\ing been twice chosen a delegate to the Republican state conven- 
tions, besides taking an active part in national campaigns. 

The subject of this re\'iew is proud of his family and has every reason 
to be so. His children appreciate his efforts in their behalf and now. in 
homes of their own and responsible positions and professions, they hold him 
in the highest esteem, repose great confidence in his judgment and counsel, 
and bv all means at their command endeavor to keep unsullied the luster of 
an honored family name. Though practically retired, he still lives on his 
farm nnd gives personal attention to his business affairs. He takes great in- 
terest in fine live stock, making a specialty of blooded horses, which he breeds 
and raises for the market, and he feeds a large number of cattle, which add 
verv materially to his income. He has literally remained in the harness dur- 
ing all the years of his long and somewhat strenuous life and, though past 
the eightieth mile stone on the journey from this world to the next, he is still 
hale and hearty, retaining to a marked degree his physical powers, being 
mentally as keen, alert and observing as in the days of his prime. 



936 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

CLAUS J. GLUESIXG. 

On the farms are found the plain and elemental virtues and the rugged 
strength which characterize the citizens of any state which can be ranked 
as truly great. Here better than in the city's rush and turmoil have these 
virtues the chance to grow and expand, and reach fruition in lives which may 
be quiet, but are not weak. As still waters run the deepest, so we may find 
the truest, strongest characters in the quiet of some farming community. 

Claus J. Gluesing was born in Holstein. Germany, March 2. 1836, son 
of Jacob and Margaret (Paulsen) Gluesing. His parents were natives of 
Germany, and his father died there in 1842. His mother came to Clinton 
county. Iowa, in 1869, and died here in 1876. Of their four children, two 
are living. 

Claus Gluesing grew to manhood in Germany and received his education 
there. In 1866 he came to Clinton county. Iowa, and worked on the farms 
for three years, then in 1869 he rented a farm, and in 1872 bought a farm of 
eighty acres, to which he has added until now he is the owner of two hundred 
and eighty acres, all of which has been made by his own exertions. In 1902 
he retired from active work and came to De Witt, where he has since lived. 
In politics he is a Democrat, and was township trustee of De Witt township 
for four years, and before that was road supervisor and school director. He 
and his family are members of the Lutheran church of De Witt. 

Mr. Gluesing was married on February 18, 1869, to Agatha Marie Lev- 
sen, daughter of Lorenzo and Anna Catherine (Sebersen) Levsen. Her par- 
ents were natives of Schleswig and came to this countr\^ in 1852, and located 
on a Clinton county farm, and here her father died September 18, 1882, and 
her mother on March 9, 1890. They were the parents of six children, of 
whom three are living. Mr. Levsen was a Democrat and he and his family 
were Lutherans. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gluesing are the parents of ten children: Margaret C, 
born November 24. 1869; Anna C, born January 9, 1872: Louise M.. born 
May 12, 1874; John L., born November 10, 1876; Claus H.. born December 
12, 1878: Claus J., born March 2, 188 1 ; Frederick B., born April 5, 1883; 
Bertha D., born September 10, 1885; Matilda A. M., born December 16, 
1887; and Theresa A. W., born March 9, 1890. Seven of these children are 
married, namely: Margaret C, February, 1893, to Claus F. Grave: Anna 
C, January 14, 1896, to William Timm; Louise M., January 14, 1896, to 
Joseph H. Wiese ; John L., September 4. 1901, to Martha Gaulitz : Claus H.. in 




MR. AND MRS. CLAUS J. GLUESING 



THE NEW YORK- 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



AS"0'', LENOX, ANB 

TILliEN FOUNDATIONS 

R L 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 937 

Februar}^, 1902. to Jennie Osterberg; Claus J., May 17, 1905, to Cora Wes- 
ton; Frederick B., December 7, 1910, to Emilie Statley. 

Mr. Gluesing reached this country with nothing, at an age well into 
young manhood, and has by his industry and exertions since made himself 
one of the leading and prosperous farmers of the township. Surely such a 
life is an inspiration to any one who may read of it, or who knows his history. 
He is spending his older days in peace, surrounded by his friends. 



JOHN FRED BENDTSCHNEIDER. 

In going over Clinton county one is impressed with the large number of 
thrifty farmers of the Germanic race who have settled within our borders, 
most welcomed citizens, all of them, for they are, it may be said, almost with- 
out exception, hard workers ; they believe in improvements, in progress, in 
keeping abreast of the times, and in such a nature-favored region as this we 
find them almost always prosperous, for all they have to do here is to work, 
to make the effort and their toil is abundantly rewarded. 

One such is J. F. Bendtschneider, whose birth occurred in Germany in 
September, 1846. He is the son of John and Catherine (Sievers) Bendt- 
schneider, both born in Germany, where they were reared and married; they 
came to America in May, 1857, and located in Davenport, Iowa, and there 
lived a year and a half, then moved to a farm near Charlotte, Clinton count}% 
where they lived several years or until the father's death in 1869. He took 
out naturalization papers and became one of the community's best citizens, 
and he was a successful farmer. His wife survived him until the spring of 
1888. They were the parents of three children. The father had sen-ed quite 
awhile in the German army and he made an excellent soldier. 

The subject was educated in the public schools of this county and reared 
on the home farm here, which he worked on when but a small boy and he has 
made farming his chief life work. In the fall of 1869 he bought eighty acres 
in Boone county and lived there three years, got a good start and then returned 
to Clinton county and rented a farm for some time near Bryant. After living 
on two different farms he moved to Lincoln tow^nship and bought tw'o hun- 
dred and twenty acres, which place he still owns, and which he has brought 
up to a high state of improvement. He has a neat, substantial and comfort- 
able home and excellent outbuildings. He has transformed this farm since 
purchasing it into one of the best in the township in every respect, it being 



93^ CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

greatly admired by all who see it. As to fertility of soil, he has brought it 
up to a high state of cultivation and has so skillfully rotated his crops and 
applied artificial fertilizers until it is as rich as at any time in the past. He 
has now retired from active work and is living in an attractive and comfort- 
able house at No. 516 North Sixth street, Lyons. 

In politics he is a Republican, but has not been an office-seeker. He and 
his wife are members of the Lutheran church at Lyons. 

The subject was married on February 26, 1874, to Anna Born Grants, 
a native of Germany, from which country she was brought to America by her 
parents when one year old. This family settled near Charlotte, Clinton 
county, Iowa, later moving to Lyons, where both parents died. 

Seven children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Bendtschneider, named as 
follows: Ella, the wife of John Ommen; J. Adolph; Martha, the wife of 
John Holdorf ; Clara, the wife of Arnold Peterson; Arnold, Anna and Henri- 
etta, all three at home. 



WILLIAM B. CLARK. 

One of the well known and progressive citizens of Delmar, Clinton 
county, is William B. Clark, a man who would doubtless make a success of 
whatever he turned his attention to owing to the fact that he possesses many 
of the qualities that win — perseverance, tact, good common sense and a spirit 
of fairness, and now as the evening shadows of life envelop him, he can look 
backward across the years with no compunction of conscience and forward 
with no fear or apprehension. 

Mr. Clark was born in Wentworth county, Canada, December i, 1837, 
and received a good education in his native community in the public schools 
and also attended the district schools of Clinton county, Iowa, having been 
brought here in his boyhood by his father, James B. Clark, whose sketch ap- 
pears on another page of this work. William B. Clark taught school for 
five years, showing the interest he takes in school work. It was in 1855 that 
this family came to Clinton county. Here the father died soon afterward 
and the mother bought a farm in Bloomfield township and the subject made 
his home on the farm with his mother until after he became of age. At the 
time of leaving home he bought a farm south of Delmar, and in 1865 he sold 
out and bought eighty acres in another section in Bloomfield township which 
he still owns, having later added another eighty, his farm now consisting of 
one hundred and sixty acres. He brought it up to a high state of improve- 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 939 

ment and retired from active farming in 1901, buying a modern residence in 
Delmar where, surrounded by all the comforts of life, he is spending his old 
age in quiet and happiness. 

Mr. Clark was married in 1865 to Harriett Cotton, who was born in 
Gasport. Niagara county, New York, July 25, 1841, the daughter of William 
and Harriett (Hanks) Cotton, the father a native of Vermont and the mother 
of New York. They came to Jackson county, Iowa, in 1859 and located at 
Maquoketa, where Mr. and Mrs. Clark were married. To this union six 
children were born. Flora A. Clark's birth occurred on April 21, 1866. She 
was educated in the schools of Delmar and spent one year in Cornell College, 
Mt. Vernon, Iowa, then taught school five terms, one term in Cedar county 
and four in Clinton county. In 1888 she was married to \\''illiam W. Willey, 
who was born in Shipton, Canada, May 7, 1859, the son of William and Sarah 
(McNeal) Willey, the father born in New York in 18 19 and the mother in 
Shipton, Canada, in 1829. They were the parents of seven children, of which 
number, W. W. Willey, was the fourth in order of birth. They came to 
Clinton county many years ago and located in Bloomfield township. Mr. 
Willey was employed as M-akeman and conductor on freight trains for the 
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul railroad for many years, then for about six 
years he successfully conducted a grocery store at Delmar, during which time 
he also very ably filled the position of postmaster, from 1886 to 1892. He 
worked at the carpenter's trade for a short time and also clerked in a general 
store for Fred Goodjohn for about two years. For a number of years he 
was manager of the Milliken Produce Company, then with his brother Ed 
and I. C. Spencer and others founded the Delmar Produce Company, of 
which he was the moving spirit, and he became manager of the same, which 
position he discharged most worthily until 1909, in which year he moved to 
Carrollton. Missouri, and became president of the Willey Produce Company. 
In 19 10 he returned to Delmar and is at present connected with the Jeffries 
Construction Company as bookkeeper and purchasing agent. He is a member 
of the Masonic order and the Modern Woodmen of America. Mr. and Mrs. 
Willey are the parents of four children: Isabell G.. born in 1892: William 
F., born in 1895; Paul A., born in 1897; Jeanette E.. born in 1901. Since 
the spring of 19 10, Mrs. Willey and family have made their home with 
William B. Clark, the subject. 

The second child of Mr. and Mrs. William B. Clark, Vern B., was born 
in 1864 and lives at Delmar; Archie W.. born in 1868, lives at Colorado City, 
Colorado; Fred A. died when five years of age; Edith M., wife of George 
Gage, was born in 1879 and lives on her father's farm; Grace, who married 
Fred Luther, was born in 1880 and lives at Oelwein, Iowa. 



940 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

Mrs. William B. Clark was called to her rest on September 25, 1909. 
She was an excellent woman and had a host of warm friends. 

Politically, Mr. Clark is a Democrat and has been more or less active 
for many years, having held almost all the township offices and since moving 
to Delmar he has been a member of the school board. He is a public spirited 
man and never lets an opportunity go by whereby he can do something to pro- 
mote the community and county. His life has been led along safe and hon- 
orable lines and he is held in high esteem throughout the county. 



CHARLES BUECH. 

A popular and successful merchant of Goose Lake. Clinton county, is 
Charles Buech, who has the confidence and good will of the people of the vicin- 
ity in which he lives, for his dealings with his fellow men have always been 
square and straightforward and he has done much for the upbuilding of the 
town and vicinity. 

Mr. Buech was born near Kiel, Germany, August 26, i860. He came 
to America at the age of five years and was educated in the Iowa district 
schools. He is the son of Charles H. and Anna (Ehlers) Buech, both born 
in the old country, where they married. He continued a laborer until i'865, 
when he came to America, the trip on an old sailing vessel requiring seventy- 
one days. They landed at New York, and a week later they were in Daven- 
port, Iowa. The subject's grandfather also came. They had small means, 
and had all to make and nothing to lose. From Davenport they came to Clin- 
ton county by ox team. Charles H. Buech got his family located and he did 
such work as he could find to do; his children gleaned the fields of the farm- 
ers after the harvest. The following season he rented a small farm and was 
successful ; the next season he rented a larger farm, and the next season rented 
still another larger farm, worked hard, as also did his family, his wife and 
children working in the harvest. Success crowned his efforts and in 1875 he 
made a sale, selling off stock and machinery, and in 1877 bought out a hotel 
and dance hall with saloon, and engaged in business, in which he continued ten 
years, then retired to his private home, where he remained until 1888, ^vhen 
he, with the subject, bought the store which the son continues to conduct. 
They rented the building and four years later bought the building and he left 
his name to the business to establish credit for the son. The firm name at 
that time was C. H. Buech & Son, under which name the firm yet continued 



m 


■ --- 


Tin- NK^.7 


YORK 


TILl)K\ I • 

i; 


TONS ■ 




MRS. DORA BUECH 




CHARLES BUECH 



PrLLR; LIBUARY 



A'^'lj", LKNOX, ANB 

TILbEN I'ULNDATIONS 

It L 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA, 94I 

in business (until after the death of the father) and in which the son has also 
been successful, it being now known as the Charles Buech Company. C. H. 
Buech was retired for many years, and liis death occurred September 14. 1909. 
His wife died in May. 1900. In early life he was a hardworking man, and 
by honest dealing he created a competency for his old age. He was reared a 
Lutheran, from which faith lie never departed. He was always a social man, 
and enjoyed having his friends around him. He was well known and highly 
respected and his honor and integrity were above reproach. He seldom failed 
on a payment, or if he did, he would make arrangements so that no trouble 
would result. He was formerly a Republican, but later became a Democrat, 
but had held no office. To him and his wife were born three children, Charles, 
Johanna and Lena. 

The son, Charles, bought and held the store, and in starting out, for a 
number of years he worked three hundred and sixty-five days in the year; he 
worked up a good trade and has been veiy successful. He has had some 
misfortunes such as usually overtake business men, and was once robbed of 
over one thousand dollars, but he kept steadily at his work and now has an 
excellent trade and does the business for Goose Lake'and surrounding countr\\ 
He gave the business all his attention. When he bought the store his father 
received the appointment of postmaster and he appointed the son assistant. 
They continued in this relation until 1893, when he was appointed during 
President Harrison's administration. He has established a rural route and 
has increased the postoffice receipts from thirty-five dollars per quarter to more 
than eighty dollars. He was once mayor of the town, but he does not aspire 
to office. He is widely known and commands the confidence and respect of 
the town and surrounding community and all who know him. 

Mr. Buech was married on April 27, 1893, to Dora Martens, who was 
born in the province of Holstein, Germany, on October 30, 1867. She is a 
worthy wife and good helpmate. She is the daughter of Hans and Margaret 
(James) Martens, both of Holstein, Germany, where he was a stone contractor 
for public and private and railroad bridges. There they remained until all 
their eight children were born, and in 1880 they brought their family to 
America, landed in New York and later came to Iowa. They rented a farm 
in Pottawattamie county, and lived there five years, then bought a farm in 
Harrison county, and remained there until 1905, when he turned over the 
farm to a son and retired from labor. He resided at Persia. Iowa. He was 
successful in general farming and stock raising. He and his wife are both 
living, he seventy-eight years of age and she seventy-five years old. Both were 
brought up in the Lutheran church and they have never departed from that 



942 • CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

faith. They had eight children, the wife of the subject being the fourth 
child. 

Four daughters have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Bench, namely : Emma, 
born January 25, 1894, is well educated and is clerking with her father; 
Maleta, born July 9, 1895; Lillian, lx)rn September 26, 1897, and Dora, born 
November 21, 1902. 

Mr. Beuch has not been an aspirant for political office, but he has con- 
tinued postmaster over twenty years, his faithful services being very salis- 
factoiy to the public. 



LOUIS C. KEINER. 



Success has been worthily attained by Louis C. Keiner. who is prom- 
inently identified with the business life and upbuilding and development 
of the town of Goose Lake, Deep Creek township, Clinton county, a man 
who has the confidence and good will of all who know him, for his life has 
been exemplaiy. 

Mr. Keiner was born at Davenport, Iowa, February 13, 1865. He 
was reared there and attended school, later went to a German private 
school and received a good elementary education. He is the son of John E. 
and Catherine (Arp) Keiner, the former born in Schwartzau, Saxony, the 
latter a native of America. They were married at Davenport, Iowa. He 
was by trade a nailsmith in the old country. He came to America in 1858, 
landed at New York and soon after came to Davenport, Iowa, when that 
city had just started. Later he was employed in a sawmill and was the head 
sawyer for twenty-five years. The firm name w-as French & Davis and 
later French & Son. During this period he married and later visited his 
native country one year, then returned to Davenport, and engaged in the 
saloon business two years. He was successful and then he settled on a farm 
in western Iowa and lived there si.x years. His wife died in 1880; then he 
returned to Davenport and lived there four years, then came to Goose Lake 
in January, 1893, and bought a hotel, including nine acres of land, and the 
subject took the business and has since conducted it successfully. He was 
formerly a Republican and later a Democrat, but never aspired to office. He 
was reared in the Lutheran church, from which faith he never departed. 
He was enterprising and public spirited and well posted in business. He 
bought bank stock and also brewery stock. He came to America with no 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 943 

money, but by good financial methods and honest dealing, he created a good 
estate. For many years he made his home with the subject, his son, after 
coming to Goose Lake, where he died August 23, 19 10, and was buried at 
the Engwesen cemetery. He was kindly cared for by his son and family 
and his declining years were spent in contentment and were the 
happy days of his life. The earliest days of his business life after coming 
to America, were spent like those of many Germans coming to this country — 
they had nothing to lose and all to make; he fought out the battle of life 
and won. He was a broad-minded, intelligent man and a good financier. 
By hard work and honest dealing he created a competency for his old age. 
He was social and enjoyed friends around him. He was charitable to the 
afflicted and needy, a good neighbor and friend. He became widely known 
and highly respected, his integrity and honesty being above reproach. He 
reared two sons and one daughter, all influential and highly respected, the 
subject being the second youngest child. The father died at a ripe old age. 
being in his eighty-third year. 

Louis C. Keiner, of this review, remained under the parental roof, until 
1889. ^vhen he married at Omaha, where he was clerking, and there he re- 
mained as a clerk for four years, then came to Goose Lake. Iowa, where he 
has since remained. He has remodeled his house and added to it and built 
machine sheds and increased the property and engaged in selling machinery, 
coal, flour, feed and all kinds of machinery, buggies, carriages and wagons. 
He erected an electric light plant and lights the town. He has caused the 
streets to be macadamized and gutters put in, and has done more than any 
other man in making and building up Goose Lake. He promoted the 
Goose Lake Savings Bank, and got it organized in Januaiy, 1908. with a 
capital of twenty thousand dollars, with Henry Kruse, president; George 
B. Boothby, vice-president ; and W. F. Schroeder, cashier. Directors : H. 
Kruse, George B. Boothby, Louis C. Keiner, W. F. Schroeder, L. E. Keiner, 
Christopher F. Schroeder, J. Sullivan and C. F. Schroeder. It was organized 
under the laws of the state as a bank of deposit and discount. A recent 
statement makes the following showing: Resources — loans, time and de- 
mand, $84,757.07; realty and fixtures, $15,569.50; surplus, undivided cash 
and due from banks, $15,569.50; liabilities — capital, $20,000; undivided 
profits, $1,734.55; sight deposits, $24,689.08; savings deposits, $61,706.61. 
Four per cent on savings. The subject is a director and active in the in- 
terests of the bank and one of the live men of Goose Lake. He, with two 
other men, bought land and platted an addition to Goose Lake, known as 
Kruse's addition. The subject has invested some surplus in Texas lands, 



944 CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 

large tracts of valual^le real estate. He is enterprising" and public spirited 
and ready to take hold of any enterprise to boost Goose Lake and is among 
Clinton county's sturdy men financially. 

Mr. Keiner married Mary Martons, who was born in the province of 
Holstein, Germany, and came with her parents to America. She is the 
daughter of Hans and Margareta (James) Martons, both of Holstein, Ger- 
many, who left the old country and came to America in 1880, and were suc- 
cessful farmers and ha\'e now retired from all active business. They are 
Lutherans and reside at Persia, Iowa. He has been successful and is well 
known and highly respected, a good citizen. They reared four sons and four 
daughters, the sons being successful farmers ; one has died. 

Seven children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Keiner: Johnny, born in 
1892; Edward, born in 1893; Malinda, born in 1895; Helma, born in 1897; 
Janett, born in 1899; Louis, born in 1901 ; and Mona, born in 1903. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. Keiner were reared in the Lutheran church, from which faith 
they have never departed. They are popular in the social life of the com- 
munity and are pleasant people to know. 



JOSEPH F. BLUMER. 

The soil and climate of Clinton county are especially suited to stock 
farming, and of the many branches of stock farming, dairying is one of the 
most profitable when systematically managed. The value of the dairy prod- 
ucts of this country is infinitely greater than the value of the product of the 
gold and silver mines, and it is difficult to conceive how we could live without 
the milk and butter which are supplied for us by the faithful cow. Mr. 
Blumer has found in daiiying an attractive and pleasant pursuit, and has 
shown his good management in conducting this business. 

Joseph F. Blumer was born in Scott county, Iowa, on November 19, 
1887, th^ son of Jacob J. and Mary (Nelson) Blumer. His father was born 
in Engi, Switzerland, and came to Scott county, Iowa, in 1881, where he met 
Mary Nelson, who had come to the county from Sweden about the same 
time, and married her. They were the parents of five children, of whom two 
are living, Joseph and John. Mrs. Blumer died in 1894, and Mr. Blumer is 
now living in his native village of Engi, Switzerland. 

Joseph Blumer grew up on the farm, and attended the public schools. 
In 1893 his parents came to Clinton county, and located on a farm of two 




JOSEPH F. BLUMER 



THE NEW YOKK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



AS'''0'l, LENOX, ANP 

TILDEN FOUNDATIONS 

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CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 945 

hundred and forty acres. His father improved the farm and erected the 
present buildings, including a handsome residence. Joseph now owns one 
hundred and sixty acres, comprising the homestead. He carries on general 
farming and stock raising, and makes a specialty of dairying. This he has 
made profitable and he is following in his father's steps as a successful 
farmer. 

In politics, Joseph Blumer is an independent voter. Though young, with 
his life mainly in the future, he has already accomplished much as a successful 
farmer and has made many friends for himself. In character he exemplifies 
the strong traits of the two strong races, the Swiss and the Swedish, from 
which he is descended. He is a young man of the finest traits of character. 
He carries on an extensive business, employing three men, and, not being 
married, he keeps two men and their families, beside a boy, to look after 
things in general. 



WILLIAM R HANRAHAN. 

For a number of years William F. Hanrahan. well known merchant, 
general stock and coal shipper and grain dealer, of Charlotte, Iowa, has been 
a potent factor in promoting the progress of Waterford township along 
material, social and civic lines, consequently his name well deserves a place 
in the record of the representative citizens of this locality. 

Mr. Hanrahan was born in Upper Canada, near Ottawa, March lo, 
1837, and was reared on his parents' fann and received a good practical edu- 
cation. He is the son of William and Ellen (Flynn) Hanrahan, both na- 
tives of Ireland, he born in county Tipperary and she in Cork. Both 
came to Canada when voung. in 182^, and were married there. He was the 
son of Daniel Hanrahan, a farmer and an early settler in Canada, where he 
reared his family, and there his death occurred. After this event, in May, 
1 861. his widow and all the family came to Clinton county, Iowa, the father 
of the subject having come in the fall of i860, bought land and returned to 
Canada and in the spring moved the family here ; his mother spent the re- 
mainder of her days here, dying at the advanced age of ninety years. Her 
family consisted of eight children, all of whom settled in this county and 
all died here. William Hanrahan. who married in Canada, was born in 1802 
and his death occurred in 1880, at the age of seventy-eight years. He bought 
land here and improved it, spending the remainder of his life here. He 
was verv successful as a general farmer and he raised and handled large 
(60) 



946 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

numbers of live stock for the market, shipping to Chicago. He paid seven 
dollars per acre for his first land, and by thrift and industry added to the same 
until he owned two hundred and forty acres. He had one of the best farms 
and most comfortable homes in the early days here. Politically, he was a 
Democrat and was a member of the Catholic church. He was a good and 
useful man in his community, charitable and ready to assist in any good 
cause at all times, and he was highly respected by all. His wife died in 
December, 1880. at the age of seventy-tw^o years; she was the daughter of 
James Flynn, a native of Ireland, where he spent his life. She had three 
brothers in Canada, James, Thomas and Patrick, w^ho later settled in New 
York. Five sons and five daughters were born to the father of the subject, 
named as follows: Daniel, a farmer, died, leaving six children; William F., 
of this review ; Ellen, Mrs. Magin ; Margerv% Mrs. T. Dunn ; Julia entered 
the convent and later went to France, thence to South America ; Mary, Mrs. 
Boyle; Nancy A., also a sister at an orphans' home. New York, where she 
died aged thirty- four years; Thomas a successful farmer, died leaving five 
children; Martin, farmer, died" in the East; Patrick, farmer, is yet single. 

William F. Hanrahan spent his youth at home and assisted with the 
farming until he was twenty-four years of age, then came to Iowa and as- 
sisted his father start a new home. He then engaged in farming for him- 
self and in buying fat stock and marketing them before the days of railroads, 
and w^as very successful. He continued thus for several years, then, in 
1^871, he and C. McGinn erected a building at Charlotte and engaged in the 
mercantile business. After a year or two he bought Mr. McGinn's interest 
and he has continued to conduct the business alone and has been rewarded 
with abundant success. In the early days he was obliged to do credit 
business, and the most he ever lost in one year was about one hundred dollars. 
His business grew until he was not only busy himself, but his wife and 
various clerks assisted. He has several farms, and he is also a stockholder 
in the Farmers and Merchants Bank at Charlotte, Iowa. He has built three 
valuable properties, which he rents. He has furnished coal to the people of 
this vicinity for thirty years, and since 1881 he has been engaged in buying 
and shipping grain. He has been very successful in whatever line he has 
turned his attention to, and he is one of the leading financiers and men of 
commerce in this vicinity, and has done as much as any other man for 
the good of the town and community. During Cleveland's administration 
he was appointed postmaster and filled the position for four years in a 
very creditable manner. He has witnessed and been a most important par- 
ticipant in the general development of the town and surrounding country, 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 947 

and he is widely known and commands the respect and confidence of the peo- 
ple. Politically, he is a Democrat and he has filled the office of tax collector 
for several years. He has been a notary public since 1876 and he has per- 
formed a great deal of successful business. He was reared in the Catholic 
faith and has never departed from the mother church. 

Mr. Hanrahan was married to Mary O' Toole, who was born in Can- 
ada and who has made a w^orthy and faithful helpmeet. She is the daughter 
of Thomas O'Toole, of Ireland, who came to Canada in an early day, thence 
to Clinton county in 1853, having had but very little capital when he reached 
here. He first rented a farm, later bought and sold farms and engaged in 
stock raising, feeding and shipping. He made a specialty of grading up 
young short-horn cattle, visiting cattle countries and bringing voung thor- 
oughbred stock to this county, becoming widely known as a stock man, and 
thus by his industry he created a large estate. Politically, he was a Demo- 
crat and he filled the office of justice of the peace. His death occurred May 
20, 1908. He was a member of the Catholic church and was a good and 
useful man, honored by all. In his family were ten children, an equal number 
of sons and daughters, the wife of the subject being the third in order of 
birth. 

The following children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Hanrahan : 
Frank is assisting his father in the store ; Laura is still at home ; Charles is 
assistant cashier in the Farmers and Merchants Savings Bank at Charlotte; 
Birdie is the wife of Frank Monahan, undertaker ; Aloysius is assisting his 
father in the store ; Sarah is at home and is engaged in teaching music. 



HANS H. CHRISTENSEN. 

One of the young and progressive farmers of the vicinity of Calamus, 
Clinton county, is Hans H. Christensen, who has achieved success because 
he has worked for it along legitimate lines and has left no stone unturned 
to better himself, and judging by the strides he has made toward the goal 
of success in the past, the future holds for him much of prortiise. 

Mr. Christensen was born in this county on June 7, 1876, and is the 
son of Hans and Bertha (Faltensen) Christensen, both natives of Norway, 
the father born on September 12, 1822, and the mother on December 12, 
1832. They grew to maturity in their native land and were educated there, 
coming to America when single and locating in Clinton county, Iowa, the 



948 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

father emigrating here in 1857, and the mother in 1861, and here they were 
married in 1862. Eight children were born to them, six of whom are hving. 
The paternal grandmother. Bertha Christensen, came to this county from 
Norway with her son Hans, father of the subject, and here she spent her 
last days. Hans Christensen was a farmer by profession and he became 
the owner of a good farm of one hundred and sixty acres, on which he 
spent the remainder of his life, dying on August 14, 1884. In politics he 
was a Republican, and he and his family were members of the Lutheran 
church. The mother of the subject is still living, and is making her home 
with her son, Hans H. She is now advanced in years, but is active and 
keeps her home neat and attractive. 

Hans H. Christensen was reared on the home farm, which he assisted in 
developing, having been put to work in the fields when but a lad, and he at- 
tended the neighboring schools during the winter months. He has devoted 
his life to farming and is managing the homestead of one hundred and sixty 
acres in an able and successful manner, keeping the place well improved and 
handling some good stock. Politically he is a Republican, but he has never 
been an office seeker. He is a member of the Lutheran church. Mr. Chris- 
tensen has remained unmarried. 



JOHN N. HOMRIGHAUSEN. 

The farms of Clinton county are well suited to the raising and feeding 
of cattle. Luxuriant pastures offer in the growing seasons of the year the 
best of nourishment for the animals which are to become food for mankind, 
and the cornfields yield a product which is most easily and profitably mar- 
keted by feeding it to stock \vhere grown. Stock feeding maintains the fer- 
tility of the soil better than any other means can, and thus the stock feeders 
are the farmers who obtain the largest yields from cultivated crops. But, 
like most other branches of farming, stock feeding is not profitable unless 
managed along systematic business principles, as the Homrighausen Brothers 
have done, and they owe their success as stock dealers to the same methods. 

John N. Homrighausen was born in Clinton county, Iowa, on the old 
Homrighausen homestead, on April 9, 1870, the son of John H. and Marie 
Christine (Peek) Homrighausen. John H. Homrighausen was born in Ger- 
many on July 12, 1827, and came to Clinton county, Iowa, in 1864. Here 



THE MW I-ORK 

PUBLrc I.Ii'..;AIiY 



AST 

TT7' . 




MRS. MARIE HOMRIGHAUSEN 




JOHN H. HOMRIGHAUSEN 



THE NEAV YORK 

PUBLrc LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX, ANP 

TlLUtN FOUND ATl'oNS 

R L 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 949 

he was married on December 5, 1868, his wife, who was also a native of Ger- 
many, having been born on October 23, 1845. They \vere the parents of six 
children : John N. ; Charles L. ; Elizabeth, now the wife of Fred Rowold, of 
Wheatland; Anna, the wife of William Hoker, a farmer of Liberty town- 
ship; Fred, a farmer of Spring Rock township; and Mary, the wife of Ferdi- 
nand H. Schneider, of Spring Rock township. 

John H. Homrighausen settled on one hundred and twenty acres in 
Clinton county, and added to this until he owned at the time of his death three 
hundred acres of land. In politics he was a Democrat and he and his family 
were members of the Reformed church. Hard working, honest and thrifty, 
he accumulated a considerable estate, and was a man who had many friends 
and possessed a strong influence in his community. His death occurred on 
July 15, 1893; his wife survived until May 19, 1909. 

John N. Homrighausen grew up on the farm and attended the district 
schools. As soon as he was old enough, he began to help on the farm, and 
has made farming his business since. He now owns two hundred and ten 
acres of the homestead, on which he carries On general farming and stock 
raising. His brother, Charles L. Homrighausen, who was born in Spring 
Rock township on October 19, 1871, owns one hundred ^nd seven acres of 
land, and he and John N. farm together under the firm name of Homrig- 
hausen Brothers, and also are dealers in cattle and stock feeders. Their suc- 
cess has been marked. Both brothers are unmarried, both are stanch Demo- 
crats, and both are members of the Reformed church. Charles L. and John 
N. Homrighausen are clean cut, straightforward young men, of the type 
which one likes to meet, and their past success can only augur a more pros- 
perous future. 



HARRY E. BEEBY. 



Clinton county has been especially honored in the character and career 
of one who has forged his way to the front by a strong inherent force and 
well directed intelligence and judgment, and who stands today among the 
representative men of Charlotte and vicinity. No man in his locality oc- 
cupies a more honored place in the estimation of his fellow citizens than 
Harry E. Beeby, prominent stock and business man and vice-president of 
the Farmers and Merchants Savings Bank of Charlotte, a man who has done 
much for the general upbuilding of his vicinity and who is eminently de- 



950 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

serving of the large success he has achieved and the esteem of his fellow- 
men. 

Mr. Beeby was born in Clinton county, Iowa, May 3, 1870, and he was 
reared on a farm and educated in the district schools. He is the son of 
Daniel E. and Peninah (Reed) Beeby, the father a native of England and 
the mother of Pennsylvania. They were married in Clinton county, and 
the father came to Iowa in an early day and bought land and improved a 
farni, to which they added until they owned about seven hundred and fifty 
acres of general farming land and raised stock, later fed and shipped to the 
market. The father was a successful farmer. He was a Republican, but 
never aspired to office. He came here with small means and by hard work 
and honest dealing improved four farms and created a substantial estate. He 
was born on January 26, 1822. He was sociable and enjoyed the society 
of his friends. He was charitable to the afflicted and needy, a good friend 
and neighbor. He was well known and highly respected, his integrity and 
honor being above reproach. He was reared in the church of England, from 
which faith he never departed. He died on February 2, 1908. His wife 
preceded him to the grave, dying on Februarys 22, 1900. She was the 
daughter of Paul Reed, of Pennsylvania, who was, in an early day, a steam 
boat pilot on the Monongahela and Ohio rivers. He came to the vicinity of 
Galena, Illinois, in 1850, and Paul died at Hanover soon after the family 
moved to this county. He was a Republican, but held no office. He was a 
widely known man, especially along the rivers as a result of his long boat- 
ing career, and was highly respected by all who knew him. Following is a list of 
his children: William, S. P., Joshua, Jeremiah, Emma, Ann E., Permina 
and August. The children born to the subject's father were C. W., a stock 
shipper; Sylvester, who died in September, 1904, leaving a wife and two 
children; Francis D., a farmer, died in 1903, a single man; Harry E., of 
this review; Alice M., Mrs. Jos. Yando; John died young. 

Harry E. Beeby was reared in Clinton county on a farm and remained 
under the parental roof until he was twenty-four years old, when he rented 
the homestead farm and the father retired to Charlotte. He worked the 
old farm, and continued renting until his father's will gave him the farm 
and he remained there. 

Mr. Beeby was married in February, 1899. He engaged in general 
farming and raised, fed and shipped stock, continuing on the farm until March, 
1910, when he moved to Charlotte, where he resides. Later he sold a por- 
tion of the old farm and bought other land in this township, which place 
he conducts himself for grass and feeding stock. He continued feeding and 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 95 1 

shipping- stock and in 1907 he assisted in organizing the Farmers and 
Merchants Savings Bank, of Charlotte, took stock and helped make a strong 
institution of it. At the first meeting and organization of the directors 
he was made vice-president and director, which position he yet holds. The 
bank has a capital of twenty-five thousand dollars and the standing of the 
officers and directors is a guarantee to the depositors of safety, and this is 
recognized as among the very solid institutions of Clinton county. Mr. 
Beel>y is a strong Republican, 1>ut does not aspire to political preferment. 
He is a worthy member of the Modern Woodmen of Charlotte, and is widely 
known throughout Clinton county and commands the universal respect of 
all who know him. 

Mr. Beeby married Hattie M. Seeley. who was born in Clinton county 
in 1870, a lady of intelligence and culture and the daughter of W. H. and 
Lib (McClure) Seeley. The parents were married in the county. The 
Seeleys are all from the state of New York, where the father of Mrs. Beeby 
enlisted in the Union army and served through the war and then settled in 
this county. He saw hard service and underwent deprivations and hard- 
ships such as was meted out to soldier life. When he settled here he soon 
afterward engaged in farming, which he continued until March, 19 lo, when 
he retired to Clinton. He filed on a hundred and sixty-acre tract of land in 
1899 in Dakota where he improved and settled a farm, and where he con- 
tinued until he sold out in 19 10. He lias a competency for his old age and 
also draws a pension. Politically, he is a Republican. He is a strictly moral 
man and a faithful soldier and commands the respect of all who know him. 
His children are: Arch, Nettie, Hattie (wife of the subject), William, Ida, 
Loring, Earl and Lloyd. 

Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Beeby, namely : Flossie, 
born June 3, 1900, and Ruby, born May 28, 1902. 



FRED T. MUELLER. 



One of the best known and influential citizens of the vicinity of Buena 
Vista, Clinton county, is Fred J. Mueller, the representative of an ex- 
cellent old family and a man who has labored along such lines of high en- 
deavor as to secure success in any field. He was born in Henry county, 
Illinois, in 1864, and he is the son of Henry and Margaret (Garneart) 
Mueller, both born in Germany, where they grew to maturity, but came 
single to America and located in Illinois where they were married and 
there they took up farming. In 1864, shortly after the birth of their son, 



952 CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 

Fred J., of this review, the family moved to CHnton county, Iowa, and 
located on a farm adjoining on the east the present Mueller farm, buying 
three hundred and twenty acres, which they improved and on which they 
lived and farmed for many years, then moved to Calamus and there died, 
but his widow is still living in that town. The elder Mueller was a general 
farmer and stock raiser and was very successful, especially in raising 
Durham cattle. He was influential in his community, but was no public man, 
preferring to lead a quiet life. His family consisted of ten children, an 
equal number of sons and daughters, eight of whom are still living. He 
was a member of the Lutheran church and a Democrat. 

Fred J. Mueller, of this review, was educated in the home schools 
and when young in years turned his attention to farming, which he always 
followed. He has a good farm of one hundred and twenty acres and is a 
general farmer and stock raiser. He is a stockholder in the Farmers and 
Business Men's Mutual Telephone Company. 

Mr. Mueller was married in 1894 to Agnes Kuehl. who was born in 
Scott county, Iowa, the youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Kuehl, 
early settlers in Scott county. 

Owing to the prominence of the subject's father, Henry Mueller, the 
following paragraphs of this sketch will be devoted to his career. He was 
born June 3, 1833, and was the son of David Mueller, who came to the 
United States in 1854, and located at Hampton, Illinois, and there en- 
gaged in farming. Heniy Mueller married, in i860, Margaret Carneart, 
who was born in Germany. She left Germany with her parents, Henry 
and Marie (Bevall) Carneart, on May 10, 1854. They settled in Chicago, 
where they remained three months, then moved to Hampton, Rock Island 
county, Illinois, where they began farming. The parents died in Illinois. 

After his marriage Henry Mueller lived in Illinois until 1864, when 
he moved to Clinton county, Iowa, and bought a farm where Henry Mueller, 
Jr., now lives. He became the owner of three hundred and twenty acres, 
which he improved and on which he lived until 1896, when he retired to 
Calamus, where he resided until his death. His widow is still living in 
Calamus. They were always members of the Lutheran church. 



WILLIAM A. TYLER. 

An enterprising and highly respected citizen of Camanche township, 
Clinton county, who is deserving of the success he has achieved during his 
long years of labor in this, his native community, is William A. Tyler, a man 



THE NEW ^'aRK 
PUBLIC LlBllAllY 



T>r ■ ■ 0. NltA'-'IONS 




MRS. HULDA TYLER 




WILLIAM A. TVLER 



.^^ YORK 



■>:wv. :;:v 



^DATIOSS 
L 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 953 

who has sought to maintain the high standard of Hving set by his family and 
has therefore won the esteem of his neighbors and acquaintances. 

Mr. Tyler was born in this township and county, September 12, 1848, 
and is the son of John A. and Phoebe (Pearsall) Tyler, the father born in 
Ohio, ]\Iay 21, 1824, and died August 20, 1871 ; the mother was a native of 
New York, born December 9, 1827, and died in January, 1873. They were 
married in Clinton county, Iowa, about 1840, and entered one hundred and 
sixty acres of land in Camanche township and followed farming all his life. 
He was one of the well known and influential pioneer settlers of this county 
and a highly respected citizen. He was a worthy member of the Masonic 
order. 

The paternal grandparents of William A. Tyler were Carley and Eliza- 
beth (Simcox) Tyler. Carley Tyler, a sterling pioneer, was born in Vermont 
in 1792, and in his earlier years was engaged in rafting lumber on the St. 
Lawrence river. He enlisted in the army during the war of 1812 and fought 
at the battles of Plattsburg and Lundy's Lane, and served until the close of 
the contest. In 1818 "Uncle" Tyler, as he was familiarly knoXvn, joined the 
Masonic fraternity, taking the degrees in a lodge at Utica, New York, and 
he was sixty years a Mason, always living in accordance to its worthy pre- 
cepts. He emigrated in 18 19 to Shalersville. Portage county, Ohio, then the 
far-off Western frontier, where he married, in 1820, Elizabeth Simcox, and 
they remained there until 1842 engaged in general farming, during his twen- 
ty-two years' residence there clearing, improving, partially broke and erected 
buildings upon nine farms, selling each as soon as thus improved. When it 
is remembered that each of these farms had to be literally chopped out of the 
dense timber, a conception can be formed of the vast amount of labor re- 
quired during those twenty-two years. In 11842 he moved to Clinton county, 
Iowa, making the journey from Shalersville to Cleveland by team, thence to 
Chicago (a little hamlet in a swamp) by water, and thence to Camanche by 
team. Here he bought, for a horse, saddle and bridle, the pre-emption right 
to what is known as the Ten Broeck farm, two miles southwest of Clinton, 
which, after some years, he sold, and purchased from a Mr. Goddard what 
is known now as the Miles place, some four miles west of Camanche, where 
he rented until about the opening of the Civil war, after which time he lived 
principally in Camanche. He was successful in his labors and laid by a com- 
petency for his old age. His death occurred on July 21, 1878, in his eighty- 
seventh year. 

In the early days of Masonry in Clinton county, when Camanche Lodge 
No. 60 and Mount Moriah Chapter No. 19 were instituted, the one in 1856 



954 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

and the other in 1857, and there were no Masonic bodies nearer than Daven- 
port, their meetings were sure to draw numbers from many miles around, and 
upon their rolls are to be found the names of very many who have since be- 
come prominent in every walk of life. These oldtimers will recall Carley 
Tyler, then an aged man, as tyler of both these bodies, he having been a 
charter member of each. He was a good and useful man, was one of the 
oldest settlers of Clinton county and one of the oldest and worthiest Masons 
in the county. His memory was undimmed up to the last and it was indeed 
interesting to listen to his reminiscences, and, looking ever on the bright side 
of life and, having a keen sense of the ludicrous, his fund of anecdotes of 
pioneer days and the war of 181 2 was full and entertaining. He was a type 
of the old stock who, in defense of honor and right, did not flinch before the 
bayonets of Wellington's veterans and "who did not hesitate, with rifle on one 
shoulder and axe on the other, to hew from the dark and gloomy woods 
happy and sunny homes. His like is not met with nowadays. 

Carley Tyler's wife, Elizabeth Simcox, was born November 19, 1802, 
in the state of Ohio, and there she grew to maturity, marrying Mr. Tyler in 
181 5, and to this union nine children were born, named in order of birth as 
follows: George C, March 9, 1822; John A., father of the subject, already 
mentioned; Royal. October 4, 1826; Rahama, December 27, 1829; Horace 
Weaver, April 6, 1832. died November 11, 1892; Nancy, June 8, 1835; 
Jerome, February 3, 1838; Stearns, December 13, 1842; Chancy, June 30, 
1844. Of these children. Rahama is the wife of N. Walrod, and Nancy is the 
wife of J. A. Walrod. 

The death of the mother of these children occurred on February 6, 
1890. at the advanced age of ninety-three years. She was widely known 
and loved by all, having been a remarkable woman, kind, charitable and gen- 
ial. She was a faithful member of the Baptist church, with which she became 
identified in 1829, and lived a consecrated Christian life, and died in the faith, 
happily and with fortitude, as had her worthy husband many years before. 

The second house built in the city of Clinton, now standing, was erected 
by Royal Tyler, mentioned above. It is of stone and was put up in 1839. 

Four sons and three daughters were born to Mr. and Mrs. John A. Tyler, 
parents of the subject, all living except one, namely: George D. ; William 
A. of this review; Mary, wife of George Muhs ; Amelia, wife of C. B. Ro- 
man; Charles E. ; Henry F. ; and Adaline (deceased). Those living make 
their home in Clinton county. 

William A. Tyler received a limited education in the common schools 
and began life for himself at the age of sixteen years, when he started in as 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 955 

clerk in a general store at Canianche. He subsequently took up farming and 
this has l>een his principal life work. He was married on September 14, 
1869, to Hulda M. Stafford, daughter of Winchell and Sarah Stafford, of 
Montgomery county, Iowa. Her father was supervisor of his county two 
terms. He was a farmer by occupation. Mrs. Tyler's only brother, Frank, 
is deceased ; her two sisters are Mrs. M. Prichard and Mrs. D. Vetter, both 
living at Grant, Montgomery county, Iowa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tyler began their married life on rented land in Montgom- 
ery county, and in 1870 they came to Clinton county, this state, and pur- 
chased eighty acres, which they later sold and moved on the homestead farm. 
In 1883 they moved on their present farm, then consisting of one hundred 
and seventy-two acres, adding to this from time to time until they now have 
a fine and well improved farm of three hundred acres, very productive and 
under a high state of cultivation. Their residence was destroyed by fire in 
1902, and it has been replaced by a beautiful, commodious and modern home; 
an excellent liarn and good minor improvements have also been made ; in 
fact, everything about the place is of the best type and indicates prosperity 
and good management. 

Mr. Tyler has been a very successful farmer and business man. He al- 
ways keeps a good grade of live stock, and has an excellent dairy. He sep- 
arates his cream, which he ships daily, and he finds a very ready market for 
his dairy products. 

He has served his township as trustee for two terms and was secretary 
of the school board for twenty-four years. In politics he is a Democrat and 
takes an active part in local affairs and, in fact, is regarded as one of the 
leaders in county politics, always interested in the general welfare of the 
same and ready to do his full share in promoting the public good. He is 
prominent in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and is a member and 
liberal supporter of the Baptist church. Mr. and Mrs. Tyler are members 
of the Old Settlers' Association. They are popular throughout the county, 
numbering their friends by the limits of their acquaintance only, and no fam- 
ily in the county is held in higher esteem. 

To Mr. and Mrs. William A. Tyler nine children have been born, name- 
ly : Kittie M., July 17, 1870, is the wife of John Livingston and they have 
two children, Ruth and Helen: Clara E., iVpril 6, 1872; Bruce, June 3, 1874, 
died May 21, 1878; Fannie M., who is the wife of E. Olson, was born Feb- 
ruary 14, 1877. and they have one son. Ellsworth; Mary J., July 17, 1879, is 



956 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

the wife of Willem Allar; George E., October 29, 1881 ; Harry A., December 
31, 1883; William R., May 25, 1886; Raymond A.. July 8, i'890. They are 
all receiving good educations and careful home training. 



CHRIS SCHROEDER. 

One of the successful farmers and business men of Deep Creek township, 
Clinton county, is Chris Schroeder, whose life has been led in a manner that 
has brought no offense to any one and has resulted in great good to his neigh- 
bors, friends, and in fact, the community in general, and he is in every way, 
deserving of the success he has achieved. He was born in the province of 
Holstein. Germany, July 24, 1864. He came with his parents to America in 
1880, and was reared on a farm. He was educated in his native country and 
in the district schools of Iowa, receiving a good elementary education. He is 
a son of Otto and Wiepke (Rostack) Schroeder, both of Holstein, Germany. 
The father, who was a laborer, came to America in the year indicated above, 
landed at New York and came by rail to Clinton county, Iowa. When he 
came he had very small means and for the first year he worked as a farm hand. 
The second year he bought a small farm, and he found by this investment that 
he had hard work ahead, but was equal to the occasion. In 1898 he sold out 
and bought property at Goose Lake, remaining retired until 1901, when he sold 
out and has since made his home with one of his sons. By hard work and 
honest dealing he created a competency for his old age. In politics he was 
independent and claimed the right to vote for the man of his choice, regardless 
of politics. He never aspired to office himself. He was reared in the 
Lutheran church, from which faitli he never departed. He is social and en- 
joys his friends around him, charitable to the afflicted and needy, a good friend 
and neighbor. He is widely known and highly respected and his honor and 
integrity is above reproach. He is now, at the ripe age of eighty-two years, 
well presented and hearty. His wife yet survives, at the age of eighty-eight 
years. She belongs to the same church. She is his second wife, and was a 
widow, Margaret Wiese, with two children, whom he reared and brought to 
this country. His first wife and mother of the subject died in the old country, 
where he married the second wife. By the first wife, he had five children, 
namely: John, who died in 1881, aged twenty-three years: Dora, Mrs. Gosch, 
of Goose Lake ; August is a farmer in Jackson county ; Herman, who lives in 
Waterford township ; and Chris, of this review. 




MRS. MINNIE SCHROEDER 




CHRIS. SCHROEDER 






vi* '' 






CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 957 

The subject was born in the old country and came to America with his 
fatlier and remained under the parental roof until his marriage, in 1888. He 
then bought the old homestead and did general farming, continuing this voca- 
tion until 1894, when he bought ninety acres additional land and continued 
this work until 1899, when he sold out and rented two years near Bryant, and 
in 1901 bought his present farm and moved to it in 1902, where he has since 
remained. He has two hundred and twenty-three acres in section 15, Deep 
Creek township. He is a general farmer and raises stock and feeds cattle and 
hogs for the market in Chicago. He has been successful in all his undertak- 
ings. He is a stockholder and director in the Goose Lake Bank, also vice- 
president of the Preston Telephone Company. He is public spirited and 
enterprising and ready to help build up the county. Politically, he is a Demo- 
crat and well posted in all public affairs. He was elected secretary of schools 
and in the same year was elected township trustee, being made president of the 
board. He was elected director in 1908 of the Goose Lake Bank, which insti- 
tution he helped to promote and organize, and it has been a success and is 
among the solid institutions of the county. In 1908 he was elected vice-presi- 
dent of the telephone company. All these positions he has filled with credit 
to himself and satisfactorily to the people concerned. He was reared in the 
Lutheran church, and from that faith he has never departed. 

Mr. Schroeder was married to Minnie Kruse. who was born in this town- 
ship in 1866, a worthy wife and good helpmate. She is the daughter of Hans 
and Margaret (Peterson) Kruse, both coming from Germany in 1853. Her 
father became a prominent farmer and stock raiser in this township. He took 
little interest in politics and held no office. He was also a Lutheran, and among 
the early settlers, and a large family of the same name and connection settled in 
Deep Creek towmship. He was widely known, a man highly respected, of 
sterling integrity and honor. He died in 1901, at the age of sixty-seven 
years, .leaving a good estate. His first wife preceded him in death, dying in 
1887, and he again married, his last wife being a widow, Frederica Bartel, also 
from the old country, and she yet survives. There were no children by his 
last marriage, but eleven were born to the first marriage, all dying young ex- 
cept four: Minnie, wife of the subject; Peter is a farmer on the old home- 
stead ; Fred is a farmer on the same place : Emil is a farmer. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Schroeder six children have been born, namely : Ed- 
ward, born May 25, 1889; Emil, born May 25, 1891 ; Herman, born August 
24, 1893; Elfrieda, born September 3. 1896; Leroy, born July i, 1901 ; Ralph, 
born October 14, 1905. 



958 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

LEWIS C. BROOMFELDT. 

It is doubtful if any agriculturist in Center township, Clinton county, 
understands better the modern methods of farming than Lewis C. Broom feldt, 
and he has the ingenuity and persistency to so apply them as to reap the best 
results. He was born in this county on September 23, 1869. the son of J. 
Frederick and Margaretta (Joehnk) Broomfeldt, natives of Germany, the 
father having come to xA.merica about 1855 with his parents, Claus D. and 
wife, and located in Clinton county, Iowa, purchasing a farm of Chris Freeze, 
the latter having purchased it from the government. This land was in turn 
purchased by the subject and is now owned by him. His parents were married 
in this county. When a young man the father was employed as a laborer on 
what was known as the Calico railroad. He and the subject's grandfather led 
lives typical of pioneers in the early settlement of this county, when they 
farmed with somewhat primitive implements compared with those used today, 
when the wheels of their farm wagons were sawn from the bodies of trees and 
drawn by oxen. They often had to go to Davenport to get labor during a 
busy season, but perseverance and energy won a good home and they became 
well established, being successful as early day farmers. The father's family 
consisted of eleven children, four sons and seven daughters, four of whom are 
living: Bertha, now Mrs. Peter Schroeder; Cathrina, now Mrs. H. Mundt; 
Dors, now Mrs. M. Hansen ; those deceased are, Lena, Maggie, Anna, Emma, 
August, Henry and Fred. 

Lewis C. Broomfeldt. in his boyhood, recei\'ed a good common school 
education. When a young man he spent three years in western Iowa and 
southeastern Missouri. Returning to his childhood home, he was married, 
on April 22. 1892, to Pauline, daughter of Anton and Migraetha Stolten- 
berg, who were natives of Germany, from which country they came to 
America in 1867. locating in Clinton county, Iowa. The father was a 
stone-mason by trade. This family now lives near Mason City, Iowa, 
where the father purchased a farm. His family consists of thirteen chil- 
dren, of whom ele\-en are living, Mrs. Broomfeldt being the fourth in 
order of birth. 

Mr. Broomfeldt began his married life on his present farm, the home- 
stead of his father, and here he soon got a good start. J. Frederick 
Broom feldt' s death occurred February 23. 1885, and his widow was subse- 
quently married to Jurger Stoltenberg and they now reside at Clinton, she 
having sold the homestead to her son, Lewis C. The place consists of 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA, 959 

one hundred and sixty acres of well improved land, on which he has just 
completed a very attractive and modern residence of ten rooms. It is 
heated by a furnace and other modern equipment is found throughout. It 
was erected at a cost of three thousand dollars. He has erected and re- 
modeled other buildings on the place, having now substantial improvements 
of all kinds. He is an up-to-date farmer and successful business man. and 
merits the respect and confidence of his neighbors. He keeps an excellent 
grade of stock of all kinds and feeds a great deal for the market. 

Mr. Broomfeldt and his wife are members of the Lutheran church. 
Politically, he is a stanch Democrat and. is active in party affairs. There 
are seven children in this family, named as follows: Fred, born August 12, 
1892; George, born August 22, 1894; Herman, born December 15, 1896; 
Margaretha, born July 29, 1899; Edmund, born July 22, 1901, and his death 
occurred on June 3, 1905; Louise, born March 10, 1907; Raymond, born 
June II, 1909. 



HORACE M. COSSINS. 

One of the substantial citizens of Bloomfield township, Clinton county, 
is Horace M. Cossins, hardware merchant at Delmar. He is a man who, 
while advancing his own interests, does not lose sight of the fact that it 
is his duty to lend his influence in furthering the interests of the com- 
munity in general. He was born on December 29, i860, near Bellview, 
Jackson county, Iowa, and there grew to maturity and was educated. He 
is the son of Thomas W. and Elizabeth H. (Sharpless) Cossins, both na- 
tives of the state of Pennsylvania, born in Chester and Pottsville, respec- 
tively. They were reared on farms and educated in their communities, 
and when they reached maturity were married in the Keystone state, leav- 
ing their native hills soon afterwards, however, and coming to Iowa. They 
located in Jackson county on a farm, near Bellview, about 1846 and there 
developed a good farm from the wild conditions then existing there, mak- 
ing a very comfortable home. About 1865 they sold out and bought a farm 
west of Bellview and there the father continued to resid-e until about 1885, 
when he sold his place and moved to Maquoketa, Iowa, and there he and 
his wife spent the remainder of their lives, the father dying in 1895, when 
about seventy-six years old, and the mother in 1905, also about seventy-six 
years old. She was a member of the Congregational church. Six chil- 
dren were born to them, namely : Mrs. Eannie Goodenow lives in Maquo- 



960 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

keta; Mrs. Josephine Burgess lives in Montana; Mrs. Anna Dorchester also 
lives in Montana; Horace M., of this review; Mrs. Ella Cundill and Mrs. 
Lizzie Nitche, both of Maqtioketa, this state. 

Horace M. Cossins made his home on the farm until 1887, when he 
came to Delmar, this county, and bought the hardware store of Parker & 
Bracket and he has continued to conduct the same to the present time. He 
handles a full line of hardware and harness; in fact, carries a very large 
and complete line of all kinds of hardware and a full line of light and 
heavy harness. His is the only hardware store in Delmar. His trade has 
gradually increased with the years until today he has one of the best and 
most extensively patronized hardware stores in the county, outside of 
Clinton. He handles a splendid line of farming tools and his country trade 
extends over a wide range of territory. Owing to the considerate and 
honest treatment he has always accorded his customers, they have invari- 
ably remained his friends and he is deserving of the large success that he 
has achieved in this line. 

Mr. Cossins is a member of the Masonic order. Monitor Lodge No. 
330, at Delmar, Iowa, and also belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America 
at Delmar. Politically he is a Republican. He held the office of treasurer 
of the Delmar schools for a period of twenty-three years, during which time 
he did all he could for the betterment of the local system. 

On September 4, 1889, Mr. Cossins was married to Ella Spencer, who 
was born in Canada in 1862, the daughter of Benjamin and Mary E. 
(Ware) Spencer, natives of Canada. Mr. and Mrs. Cossins are the parents 
of three children, namely: T. Percy, born in 1891; Mary Ruth, born m 
1893, and Harlan S., born in 1895. Mr. and Mrs. Cossins are very pleasant 
people and their cozy and cheerful home is frequently the gathering place 
for their numerous friends. 



FRANCIS PATRICK McGINN. 

A young man who holds worthy prestige in business circles in Clinton, 
who has always been distinctively a man of affairs and who wields a wide 
influence among those \vith whom he has been associated and among whom 
his lot has been cast, is Francis Patrick McGinn, who has won definite suc- 
cess by the exercise of correct principles. 

Mr. McGinn was born September 27, 1880, in Clinton county, Iowa, five 
miles from the city of Clinton. He is the son of Michael McGinn, who was 




FRANCIS P. McGINN 



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CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 961 

born in county Galway, Ireland, and his mother was ^Margaret (Fagin) Mc- 
Ginn, who was born in New Jersey and wdiose death occurred in 1890. The 
father was a farmer by occupation. He grew to maturity and was educated 
in his home community, and he came to America on January 25, 1866, coming 
direct to Chnton county, where he rented various farms, here and in Jackson 
county, and in 1888 he purchased a farm in Camanche township. He was 
very successful as a farmer and had a good home. He finally sold his farm 
and retired, making his home in Clinton. Desiring to spend his declining 
years in a sunnier clime than this, he went to California some time ago and is 
now a resident of Los Angeles. He is a Democrat and a member of the 
Catholic church. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Michael McGinn three sons and seven daughters were 
born, namely: Francis Patrick, of this review^ ; Mamie, Catherine, Margaret, 
Rose, Gertrude, Martha : the next child was named Gertrude after the fonner 
child by this name who died in infancy; Thomas and John. 

Francis Patrick McGinn was educated in the public schools of Camanche 
township, this county, and after leaving school he went into the dairy busi- 
ness, having Ijeen employed in one until he learned how to manage it. He 
conducted one of his own for three and one half years in Clinton where he met 
with veiT satisfactory results. He finally sold out and in 1903 started the 
"Pantatorium" in Clinton, wliich he conducted until 1907. meeting with much 
encouragement from the start. He then began assisting in the establishment 
of the well known and popular C. O. D. Cleaning Company in Clinton for a 
Davenport firm. In March, 1910, he and Charles M. Fra'hm purchased this 
establishment and have since been conducting the same on a larger scale and 
have increased the business veiy materially. They are w^ell equipped for the 
highest grade of work, and thoroughness and promptness are their watch- 
words. Mr. McGinn is a member of the Catholic church and, fraternally, he 
belongs to the Knights of Columbus, the Modern Woodmen and the Ben Hur. 

Francis P. McGinn was married on October 23, 1906, to Loretta Laugh- 
lin, who was born in Lyons, Iowa, April 24, 1883. She is the daughter of 
Michael Francis and Elizabeth (Carvel) Laughlin, who live in Lyons, this 
county, and are a highly respected family. ■Mr. and Mrs. McGinn have no 
children. 



OTTO B. ROENNFELDT. 

The name of Roennfeldt is one well known in Center township, Clin- 
ton countv, where it has been borne by three generations of honorable and 
(61) 



962 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

upright men and women, whose Hves are here briefly recorded, and who 
have been influential and prominent in the annals of their community, where 
their presence was ever a force for good and for its best development. . 

Claus D. Roennfeldt, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, 

was born in Germany in 1806, and there married Christina . who 

was born in 1804. They emigrated to the United States with three children, 
two sons and a daughter, in 1852, landing at New Orleans on June 2d of 
that year, and coming up the Mississippi in a steamboat, arriving at Daven- 
port, Iowa, on Jnne 14th. On August 25th, of the same year, Mr. Roenn- 
feldt brought his family to the farm which is now a part of the homestead 
of his grandson. Otto. He was one of the first Germans to settle in Center 
township and endured the privations incident to the lot of the early settler. 
Having borrowed considerable money, he advanced this to his kindred 
and friends in the old country to pay their passage to this land. He was 
generous even to a fault. Of his three children. Maggie died in 1854, Fred- 
erick in 1885, leaving a wife and six children; Mrs. Roennfeldt died in 
1856, and Claus D. survived until July 21. 1886. 

Hans D. Roennfeldt was reared on the farm and devoted his life to 
that calling. He was first married in November. 1858, to Caroline Schwanz, 
who died in 1864. On Januaiw 20, 1865, he was married a second time to 
Johanna Schroeder. who was born on May 20, 1845. the daughter of Joseph 
and Margaret Schroeder. Joseph Schroeder was born on October 31, 1806. 
and died on April 11. 1884; his wife was born on October 30, 1816. The 
children of Hans D. Roennfeldt are, with the dates of their birth : August 
F.. September 24. 1865; Emma F., July 13. 1868; William G., February 
20. 1870, died on January 2. 1871 ; Margaret C, February 8, 1872; Caro- 
line S , January 11, 1874; Augusta C, January 2, 1876; Herman D., March 
18, 1878; Otto B., September 11. 1880; Annie E., August 24, 1883; and 
Sophia. May 14. 1885. and died on September 21st of the same year. 
Hans D. Roennfeldt died on December 3. 1899. and was buried in Ingwer- 
sen cemetery. He was the owner of four hundred acres of land, on which 
he erected a handsome residence and a large and convenient barn. He 
and his wife were active workers in the Lutheran church, and ]\Ir. Roenn- 
feldt was prominent in the local activities of the Republican party. There 
were few farmers of his day who could equal him in the conduct of a fami 
in the most profitable manner. 

Otto B. Roennfeldt was born and reared on the farm and attended 
the common schools, and for one vear was a student at the Clinton hi^h 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 963 

school. He was married on September 23, 1903, to Ella, the daughter of 
Henry and Dora Vogt, of Clinton county. Her father was American 
born and her mother a native of Germany. Her father was long a 
blacksmith, residing at Goose Lake, this county, and was well known for 
miles about. He died on November 21, 1900, of appendicitis, and was 
buried at Tngwersen cemetery. His wife still resides at Goose Lake. Dora 
was the eldest of four children. Mr. and Mrs. Otto Roennfeldt began 
married life on their present farm of two hundred acres, which was the 
homestead of his father and grandfather. Mr. Roennfeldt is a hustler 
and follows general farming and stock raising, keeping a goodly number 
of all kinds of stock, including good grade Shorthorn cattle and draft horses, 
ready for the market. The farm is well known for its extensive improve- 
ments and for the excellence of its soil. Its owner is a business-like young 
man, up-to-date and full of enterprise. In politics he is a Democrat. His 
stepmother resides with him. One child has been born to his marriage, a 
son, Vernon, born on December 16, 1904. 



REV. FR. M. T. HENNESSY. 

Such a life as that led by Rev. Fr. M. J. Hennessy, pastor of 
St. Patrick's church, near De Witt, Iowa, is to be held up as a worthy 
example to the youth of the land. He was born in county Limerick, Ire- 
land, in February, 1856. He received an excellent education in the public 
schools and in Christian Brothers College, and in the Diocesan College at 
Limerick and St. Patrick's College at Thurles, county Tipperary, where he 
spent five years. In October, 1879, he came to America and located in 
Dubuque, Iowa, where he finished his education and was ordained in 
August, 1881, at the cathedral, by Bishop Hennessy. His first appointment 
was as assistant to Father O'Dowd, of St. Mary's, temporarily, having re- 
mained there two months, then was sent to Boone. Iowa, for a short time, one 
month, thence to St. Rose, at Waucoma, Fayette county, Iowa. Then he 
was for a period of two years, by appointment, at St. Theresa, Jackson 
county, Iowa; he then spent three and one-half years at Monti, Buchanan 
county, Iowa, then served St. Patrick's church at Nevada and Colorado. 
Then, after serving three years and six months on three charges, in 1898, 
he was appointed to the pastorate of St. Patrick's church, Washington 



964 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

township, Clinton county, and here he spends his entire time, having no 
other charge, and is doing his utmost for the material and spiritual wel- 
fare of his congregation, building up the church, as he has done in all his 
work, and he is much beloved by all his congregation, being a faithful 
and devoted worker. The church was established by a missionarv priest, 
the first services being held in a farm house, continuing thus until 1883, 
when the present substantial brick structure was erected, at a cost of 
twenty-five thousand dollars. J. J. Garland was pastor and Rt. Rev. J. 
Hennessy was bishop. The church has a fine altar and is beautifully decor- 
ated, spacious and attractive. After its organization the congregation was 
first served by Fr. Thomas McCormick, and the first baptism was administered 
to Michael McDermot in 1875. The first marriage celebrated here was that 
of Henry Winters and Sarah Showalters, by Rev. Fr. McCormick. The 
good work has been carried on here by the following priests since his day : J. J. 
Gafiny, J. Garland, D. Reardon, T. Kiernan, Fr. Hennessy (nine months), 
John ]\Ialoy, and the subject, who took up his work here in August, 1898. 
He has kept up the property and placed it in excellent condition, keeping the 
place sanitary, attractive and inviting, spending considerable money on the 
cemetery and bringing everything up to a high standard of excellence. An 
excellent water works system has been installed, hot and cold water being 
available, modern bath and up-to-date appliances, all at his own expense. 

Politically, he is a Democrat, but reserves the right to vote for the man 
whom he deems worthiest to fill the office sought, and he makes no efforts 
to be a politician. He is a well educated, genial, good-natured and devout 
Christian gentleman. 



CHARLES MATTHEW FRAHM. 

« 

The life of Charles Matthew' Frahm has not been of an unusual character. 
Rather than strange or tragic, it has been quiet and unostentatious, a life that 
has resulted in no harm to those who have come under its influence. Though 
yet a young man, Mr. Frahm has become well established in business and in 
years to come will doubtless hold a high rank in the commercial life of this 
community. 

Mr. Frahm was born in West Chicago, June 21, 1881, and is the son of 
Charles M. and Ida (Schwen) Frahm. the father a native of Davenport, Iowa, 
and the mother of Chicago. In the last named city, the father maintained a 




CHARLES M. FRAHM 



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AgTdH, IMOl, Alft 
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CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 965 

Store for many years and was a successful retail clothier by occupation, a man 
of good business qualifications and correct life principles. His family con- 
sisted of four children, namely: Charles M., of this review; Arthur ; Mrs. 
Alma Nougey. of Davenport, and Mrs. Ada Swing, of Chicago. 

Charles M. Frahm. of this review, was educated in the public schools of 
Chicago and when a young man he entered a laundry and learned the business. 
He finally moved to Davenport, Iowa, and on November ii, 1907, he was sent 
to Clinton, this state, for the purpose of conducting a dyeing and cleaning estab- 
lishment, known as the C. O. D. Cleaning Company and owned by a Davenport 
firm. Mr. Frahm was financially interested in the l)usiness and, foreseeing 
that a local firm would be more successful and 1>etter patronized by Clinton 
people, he set about the organization of a local concern, in March, 19 10, 
which resulted in he and F. L. McGinn buying the C. O. D. Cleaning Com- 
panv and they now operate it for themselves. They are elated over the very 
noticeable increase in business during the past few months and are being well 
patronized. Their work gives eminent satisfaction, being of a very high 
order and promptly and conscientiously done. Their place of business is 
properly equipped with the most modern appliances and is operated on im- 
proved lines. The honesty and integrity of these gentlemen is unquestioned 
and the nature of their work is indicative of their ability and integrity. 

Mr. Frahm was married on September 9, 1901. to jNIay Bentler, who 
was born in Davenport, Iowa, and is the daughter of John and Lena Bentler. 
Her mother died when she was two years old. John Bentler is caretaker of 
the United States arsenal on Government Island, between Davenport and 
Rock Island. Mr. and Mrs. Frahm have no children. 

Mr. Frahm is a member of the Catholic church, the Royal Arcanum and 
the Modern Brotherhood of America, and he is faithful in the discharge of 
his duties as a church and lodge man. 



AARON P. RECORD. 

For various reasons Aaron P. Record, one of the substantial and 
highly esteemed citizens of Camanche township, Clinton county, is deemed 
eligible for specific mention in this volume, not the least of which is the 
fact that he was one of the brave "boys in blue" who offered his services 
durine the dark davs of the sixties, in defense of the beloved Stars and 



966 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA, 

Stripes "that have never touched the ground." His Hfe has been one of 
honest endeavor and filled with good deeds throughout, and now. in its 
golden evening, he is enjoying a respite in his serene and attractive home 
at Camanche. 

]Mr. Record was born May 30. 1841. in Dutchess county. New York, 
the son of Crandal and Mary (Bush) Record. The father was born on 
April 5, 1805, and died April 20. 1883. The mother was born Septem- 
ber 10, 1803, and died March 9, 1892. They were buried at Union cem- 
etery, this county. They emigrated from New York to Clinton county, 
Iowa, arriving here on April 5, 1855, and settled in Eden township where 
Mr Record purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land and there en- 
gaged in farming. They were the parents of three sons, namely: William 
H., John P., and Aaron P., of this review: the first two named are deceased. 

Aaron P. Record spent his youth at home and his schooling was 
limited. When the war between the states began, although he was but 
nineteen years of age he proA^ed his patriotism and courage by enlisting, 
on July 12, 1861, in Company A, Eighth Iowa Infantry, and he was dis- 
charged on April 20, 1866, his services having extended over a period 
of four years, nine months and eight days. He is justly proud of his war 
record, his long ser\-ice in defense of the Union proving his gallantry and 
his loyalty: but few. if any, of the veterans of his company saw longer 
service. He was in many important battles, including Shiloh, Vicksburg, 
through the siege there; Jackson, Raymond, Champion Hill, and many 
others. He was taken prisoner at Shiloh and was confined in prison at 
Macon, Georgia, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, and Libby, Richmond. Virginia, for 
six months and ten days. He was paroled out in November and ex- 
changed the following April. Mr. Record saw men fall at his right and 
left, had his canteen and haversack shot from his person, but he was never 
wounded. He won the praise of his comrades and officers. 

Upon his return from the army, Mr. Record, then twenty-four years 
old, entered school and spent two and one-half years obtaining a practical 
education. He is a well read man, in fact, one of the best posted citi- 
zens of this community, having always been an ardent student. 

Mr. Record was married February 17, 1875, to Hannah M. Davy, 
daughter of William and Mariah Davy. Mrs. Record died June 8, 1881. 
To this union three children were born, namely : Mary I., bom December 
10. 1875. married Mr. Van Epps, of this county; Bert, born March 9, 
1878, married Leta Smith; Blanche L., born December 9, 1880. married 
G. L. McKinzie, of Olathe, Kansas, where he is engaged as a florist. The 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 967 

father of these children married again, his second wife being Mrs. Carrie 
A. Dinsmore, whose maiden name was Coffman ; the daughter of Noah 
and Rhoda Coffman. Her father was a native of Indiana, where he w-as 
born May 17. 1808. and he died June 26, 1892; the mother was a native 
of Ohio and was born November 2. i8ti, dying February 3, 1883. The 
parents of Mrs. Record were married on January i, 1832, and they came 
to Chnton county, Iowa, in 1855, where they purchased one hundred and 
sixty acres of land in Eden township. There Mr. Coffman lived and en- 
gaged in farming with the exception of the Inst five years of his life, which 
were s])ent in Camanche. whither he had mo\'e(l and where his death oc- 
curred. He and his wife are both buried in Union cemetery. They were 
the parents of thirteen children, four of \A-hom are living, Mrs. Record 
being the tenth in order of birth. The parents were members of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church. Mr. Coffman was a well known and highly re- 
soected citizen, honest and upright in all his dealings. Shortly after mov- 
ing here he turned his horses out to graze and one of them swarm the Mis- 
sissippi river. 

Mr. Record began his first married life on his father's farm, which he 
purchased on September 14, 1881, pnd where he made his home until 1904, 
when he sold his farm and moved to Camanche, where he purchased good 
propertv. having moved to this place in order to give his children l^etter 
school advantages. For the past eight years he has been employed as 
United States mail carrier, delivering the mail from the Northwestern rail- 
road station to the Camanche postoffice. 

Mr. Record is a member of the Masonic order, having attained the 
degree of Knight Temphr. He is also a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythias. He is a loyal Republican. Both 
he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

To Mr. Record's last union one son was born. Vernon. March 3. 1894. 
He is a graduate of the Camanche schools and is now taking a college 
course. Mr. Record has three grandchildren. Lawn-ence VanEpps, Muriel 
Record and Leslie P. McKinzie. 



HENRY C. PETERS. 



Clinton county is well recognized as being one of the best farming 
regions in Iowa, and indeed in the United States, for the best farming 



968 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

sections in Iowa ha\'e no superior in this country. Fortunate or wise 
were those who early settled on her fertile prairies, whose amazing rich- 
ness has brought to them prosperity beyond even their wildest dreams in 
early times. Certainly the prairies of Clinton county are a beautiful and 
invigorating sight, when covered with the green fields of tasseling corn, 
variegated with the verdant sward of the pastures and meadows, on which 
fat cattle are grazing. Such sights cause the traveler to envy the lot of 
those who, like Mr. Peters, are the owners and cultivators of these wonder- 
ful farms. 

Henry C. Peters was born in Germany in 1868, and there educated. 
In 1882 he came to Clinton county, Iowa, and, recognizing the oppor- 
tunities which its farms offered to men of will and ability, selected farming 
as his occupation. At present he owns one hundred and sixty acres of 
land and carries on general farming and stock raising and feeding. In 
this latter especially he has been very successful, and his herds would make 
a creditable showing anywhere. In politics he is a Republican, while his 
religious affiliations are with the Lutheran church. 

Mr. Peters was married in 1894 to Abelina Hilbert, a daughter of 
Henry Hilbert, mentioned in this work. To their union have been born 
two children, Anna, born March 6, 1896, and Ferdinand, born April 6, 
i8q7, both of whom are now attending school, where they are progressing 
well. 

Mr. Peters is a stanch and sturdy specimen of the thrifty German 
farmer, whose industry and energy have put him to the front among agri- 
culturists of his township and whose genialty and cleverness have won 
for him many friends. 



FRANK LOHBERG. 



It is proper to judge of the success and the status of a man's life by the 
estimation in which he is held by his fellow citizens, for they cannot help but 
know the man's character in all his relations with his fellow men. what his 
ideas and ideals are, what his aims and ambitions have been and of the things 
that go to show the world the attributes of head and heart of the individual. 
Frank Lohberg, who is now sleeping in the profound silence of God's Acre, 
passed so many successful and useful years here that his worth was well 



[ 



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Pl'BLrc LIBUARY 



^TIll'HN FOUNDATIONS 

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CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA; 969 

known and no one has ever spoken in disparaging terms of him. All revere 
his memory and recall many acts of kindness or charity which he was wont 
to perform of the fullness of his heart, but not for the praise of his fellows, 
having had the same characteristics of his honored and popular father, Franz 
Lohberg, who was one of the notable men of his day and generation in eastern 
Iowa. 

Frank Lohberg was born October 27, 1866, in Lyons, Clinton county, 
Iowa, and he was the son of Franz and Elizabeth (Hoeing) Lohberg, the 
father born in 1829 in Westphalia, Germany, he having been the son of 
Joseph and Agnes (Benneman) Lohberg. Joseph Lohberg was a man of 
many sterling characteristics, which have been handed down to succeeding 
generations. Though the smallest of a family of fourteen children, he was 
six feet and two inches in height and was well proportioned, being a man of 
imposing presence and attractive personality. This family was not only 
sturdy physically, but intellectually and morally as well. 

Franz Lohberg grew to maturity in his native country and received 
a good education in the schools there. He was always more or less a student 
and by wide home reading and actual contact with the social and business 
world he became a man of high intellectual attainments, well informed on the 
current topics of the day and familiar with the world's best literature, although 
he led a veiy active and strenuous life. He was a man of rare business 
acumen and had his business so systematized in all its departments that he 
managed everything with rare ease and sureness. Believing that the United 
States held greater advantages for a man of his temperament, he accordingly 
emigrated to our shores and located in Ouincy, Illinois, in 1852, and the follow- 
ing year found him at Lyons, Iowa, ^^'ith that keen discernment which 
characterized his entire career, he foresaw the great future of this locality and 
decided to make it the scene of his future operations. For a number of years 
he worked for Allen & Waynecup. He was a brewer by profession, and a most 
excellent one. so that his services were in great demand. He saved his earn- 
ings and when the lumbering industry was in its infancy here, he purchased 
the McGill lumber business, which he managed in a manner that brought him 
an ample competency and stamped him as one of the leading lumber dealers in 
this part of the state. His business gradually increased from year to year and 
branched out over an extensive field by reason of his judicious management. 
His grandsons, mentioned below, are continuing the business successfully, fol- 
lowing out the lines which he inaugurated. He took an interest in public 
affairs, and, in fact, whatever tended to the general advancement of Lyons 



970 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

and Clinton county, and was one of the substantial and prominent citizens of 
this locality, no man being more influential in local affairs. He was one of 
the founders of the German Club here. The death of Franz Lohberg occurred 
about twenty years ago, on May 6, 1891, but he is still Well remembered and 
his influence still pervades and inspires the lives of many who were closely 
associated with him, for he had made a host of friends here and was popular 
among them. He married Elizabeth Hoeing in 1853, in Quincy, Illinois. 
She was born on July 4, 1827, and is still living, making her home on 
Division street, Lyons, Iowa. She has been a most faithful helpmeet and 
her counsel and encouragement were responsible in no small degree for her 
husband's phenomenal success and popularity. 

Two children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Franz Lohberg, one daughter 
dying in infancy, and Frank, the immediate subject of this review. This 
family are stanch Catholics and have always been liberal supporters of the 
mother church. 

Frank Lohberg was reared in Lyons and received a good education in the 
local schools. He worked for his father in the lumber business until the 
latter's death and then took charge of the same and managed it in a very able 
and successful manner for a period of six years. On August 23, 1907, he 
sold out to Ingwersen & Berbeck, and on October 17th of that year his death 
occurred, his taking off while yet in the zenith of life's powers and usefulness 
being a saddening blow to his many friends. He was a member of the 
Masonic fraternity and worthily upheld the high principles of this time-hon- 
ored order. 

Mr. Lohberg was married in June, 1887, to Minnie Forret. She is a 
lady of admirable personality and has a wide circle of friends here. She is 
the daughter of Jacob and Louisa (Gundenfinger) Forret, of Preston, Iowa, 
her birth having occurred in 1871. Her parents were people of fine character- 
istics and well known in their neighborhood. 

Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Frank Lohberg. named as 
follows: Franz, Fred and Louis, all young men of splendid business attain- 
ments and worthy sons of worthy forbears, who are striving to uphold the 
untarnished escutcheon of an honored family name. 

The neat, commodious and well furnished home of Mrs. Lohberg is at 
Division and Main streets, Lyons, and here is frequently shared a genuine 
hospitality with the many friends of herself and family. 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 971 

JOHN EDWARD SCHOENTHALER. 

The state of Iowa is a farming state, and owes its high rank in production 
among the states to the value of its farm products, while of the citizens who 
have given the state such a high reputation for the character of its inhabitants, 
the greater number are active residents of the agricultural districts. Iowa 
farmers are known throughout the nation as honorable, substantial and pros- 
perous men, and Mr. Schoenthaler is a farmer high above the ordinary, one 
of the best lowan type. 

John Edward Schoenthaler was born in Jackson county. Iowa, on July i8, 
1 871', the son of John Schoenthaler, mentioned in this work. He w^as reared 
in Elwood, Clinton county, to which place his parents moved when he was six 
years old, and there attended the public schools. In 1903 he moved to the 
fami of eighty acres on which he now resides, which his father had bought 
in 1902. Here he carries on general farming and stock raising very profitably. 
In politics he is a Democrat. Fraternally he is a member of the Modern 
Woodmen of America, and he and his family attend the Lutheran church. 

On February 20, 1895, Mr. Schoenthaler w^as married to Amanda Jorgen- 
sen, born in Berlin township, Clinton county, the daughter of Soren and Bertha 
Jorgensen. To this marriage have been born two children, Louise Ottillie, 
born on March 22, 11896, and Orville Leon, born on December 20, 1901. 

Soren Jorgensen w^as born in Denmark on January 10, 1846, the son of 
Neilson and Christina (Frederickson) Jorgensen, natives of Denmark. His 
parents spent their lives in Denmark, his father being a farmer by occupation. 
Of their family of six, four, Christina, Mary, Bertha and Marian, are still 
living in Denmark; one son, Jergen, lives in Dakota. Soren attended school 
in Denmark, and when twenty years of age emigrated to Wisconsin, where 
he worked on a farm for one year. He then came to Clinton county and be- 
gan to rent in Brookfield township, then, in 1872, bought eighty acres in Ber- 
lin township, where he now^ lives and carries on general farming. Since com- 
ing to this country he has 1)een a member of the Republican party and has 
served as school director. He and his family are members of the Lutheran 
church. On June 26, 1869, he was married to Bertha Roden, who was born 
in Bluegrass, Scott county, Iowa, the daughter of E. A. Roden. Some years 
after her death he was married to Ottillie Roden, who was born in Scott county 
on November 4, 1858. Mr. Jorgensen is the father of five children, Albert, 
Mrs. Caroline Minster, Mrs. Amanda Schoenthaler, Laura, and Lawrence. 
His neighbors esteem him highly for his integrity and uprightness. 

Mr. Schoenthaler is one of the more progressive young farmers of his 
township, and very practical in all his work. 



972 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

LANGWORTHY J. BUELL. 

The labors of Langworthy J. Buell, well known citizen of Hampshire 
township, this county, have been directed along such worthy and conservative 
lines as to bring definite results, and he now finds himself in possession of 
valuable property and a comfortable home as a result of his long years of 
persistent labor and careful planning. 

Mr. Buell was born in Lyons, Iowa, September 8, 1854. He is the son 
of Elijah Buell, who had the distinction of being the first settler of Clinton 
county and who was a prominent and influential character here in the days 
of the pioneers and who is given prominent mention in this work. 

The subject was next to the youngest child in his family. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools and grew to maturity on the home place. He later 
attended the Clinton Business College, and in 1872 and 1873 he took the 
scientific agricultural course at the university at Ames, Iowa. Thus well 
equipped for his life work, he returned to Lyons, after leaving college, and 
lived with his father until he was married, which event took place on March 
4, 1878, to Sarah Andice Henderson, who was born February 7, 1859, in Ohio. 
This union has resulted in the birth of the following children : Gladys, bom 
May 26, 1880, is deceased; Cleon, of Chicago, was born on May 30, 1882, 
and is the wife of Dr. Harry V. Shaw; Lloyd L. was born July 18, 1886; 
George, now deceased, was born March 8, 1889. 

In 1878 Mr. Buell came to a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in 
Hampshire township. His father had entered forty acres from the govern- 
ment. He has placed many substantial improvements on the place and has 
been verv successful as a farmer and stock man, having devoted a great deal 
of his attention to raising shorthorn cattle for twenty-five years, but he now 
carries on mixed farming. He has an excellent farm and a comfortable 
home. It is located in the northeast quarter of section 35, township 82. 
range 6. 

Politically he is a Democrat. He takes a great deal of interest in local 
afi^airs and has held the offices of school director, etc., also some of the town- 
ship offices. He was township clerk for six years and trustee for two 5'ears. 
Like his honored father before him, he takes an interest in whatever tends to 
the betterment of the county in any way and he is recognized as a leader in 
local affairs. He is a man whose word is as good if not better than the bond 
of many men, and he takes a delight in meeting his fellow men half way and 
on the square. By such characteristics he has won their confidence and uni- 
versal respect and maintained the high standard of citizenship set by his hon- 
ored father. 




LANGWORTHY J. BUELL 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



A^ ()■•. LKNOX, AND 

TIL1)1-N i'OUNDATIONS 

R L 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 973 

LOUIS E. FAY. 

Ill this review are mentioned briefly the facts in the Hfe of the gentle- 
man who founded the business now carried on by himself and his brother 
under the name of Fay Brothers. Fay Brothers are without question 
the most successful publishers of a newspaper in Clinton, and their paper 
substantiates all claims made in its behalf. 

Louis E. Fay was born at De Witt, Clinton county, Iowa, September 
21, 1 86 1, the son of Horace Amsden and Calista J. (Darrah) Fay. Horace 
Amsden Fay was born in Lebanon, Grafton county, New Hampshire, 
December 7, 1827. His father was Joseph Packard Fay, who was born 
in Belchertown, Massachusetts, April 25, 1792, and died at Concord, New 
Hampshire, September 9, 1872. Charlotte (Hyde) Fay, his mother, was 
born in Norwich, Vermont. June 6, 1792, and died in Concord, New Hamp- 
shire, February 15, 1872. 

Barnabas Fay, the father of Joseph P., was born in Hard wick, Mas- 
sachusetts, October 30, 1758, and served in the Revolution under Wash- 
ington, crossing the Delaware with him, and enduring the terrible winter 
at Valley Forge. His wife, Chloe (Packard) Fay, was born in Bridge- 
water, Massachusetts, November 22, 1762, and died at Lebanon, New 
Hampshire, July 19, 1848. For several years previous to her death she 
drew a pension as a Revolutionary widow. James Fay, the father of 
Barnabas, sen-ed in the Revolution and died in the army. Barnabas Fay, 
with five children, moved to Lebanon, New Hampshire, near the close of 
the last century and established a cloth dresser's business. About 1816 
he and his son, Joseph P., moved to a farm near Lebanon, New Hampshire, 
where Horace A. Fay was born. 

Horace A. Fay attended the common schools and had one term at the 
Lebanon Liberal Institute, but was prevented from going to college by 
financial reverses which overtook the family. For a time he worked in a 
grocery store and was for the seven years from 1843 to 1850 employed in 
a carpet and crockery warehouse, at the expiration of which time he went 
in with his employer, the firm bearing the name of Page & Fay. Their 
store burned and what goods were saved were removed to the rotunda of 
the State House. Mr. Fay sold his interest, and the next spring, together 
with others, erected the Merchants Exchange building, then the largest and 
best in the city. He was a Democrat, strong against disunionism and 
Knownothingism. In 1856 he made many speeches in favor of Buchanan, 



974 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

the burden of which was devotion to the Union. There was then a strong 
disunion sentiment in New Hampshire and Mr. Fay made many enemies. 
He was a member of the committee of seven appointed by the Democrats 
of Concord to receive President Pierce on his visit to Concord that year. 

In the spring of 1857 Mr. Fay sold out his stock of goods and went 
west immediately after the election, intending to go to St. Anthony's Falls, 
now Minneapolis, but at Chicago he met a former townsman, Governor 
Baker, and with him came to Clinton, Iowa. Here he and C. H. Toll 
bought a raft of lumber and shipped it to De Witt, and in July Mr. Fay 
built a wa'rehouse opposite the depot at De Witt. In September, 1857, 
he returned to New Hampshire, and on the 15th of that month was mar- 
ried to Calista J. Darrah, the daughter of Isaac and Rachel (Watts) Darrah, 
of Bedford. The bridal couple came to De Witt and began housekeeping 
in rooms over the warehouse, where they stayed for a year. Mr. Fay then 
entered the stock and grain buying business and was the first to take out 
a "broker's license" in De Witt. He handled most of the money in the 
town, one year five hundred thousand dollars passing through his hands. 
In 1864 he bought land near De W^itt and farmed most of the time until 
i'874. when he bought an interest in the Clinton Chair Company, and worked 
as bookkeeper for the company one year, then returned to his farm. In 
1877 he entered P. B. Wolfe's office as a real estate agent, and had been 
there but a short time when J. C. Hopkins, the editor and publisher of the 
Clinton County Advertiser, asked Judge Wolfe to recommend a good man 
to him as correspondent at De Witt for the Advertiser. He recommended 
Mr. Fav, who was immediatelv engao:ed and entered his new field with much 
energy. That year the circulation of the paper was so much increased 
that the board of supervisors elected it as one of the official papers of the 
county, and in 1883 the De Witt office was moved to Mr. Fay's new build- 
ing- In that same year his son purchased the paper. Horace A. Fay re- 
mained actively connected with the Advertiser as De Witt editor until his 
death, on March 18, 1905. For many years he had been a member of the 
school board of De Witt, being first elected in 1866, and was a long time 
justice of the peace. He \vas a man of much public spirit, and was much in- 
terested in all advancement. His wife died on January 16, 1910. 

Louis E. Fay was born September 21, 1861, at De Witt, and attended 
school there in the winter, spending his summers on the farm. When sixteen 
he entered the Advertiser office as a "devil" at three dollars per week. He 
was a faithful worker and eager to please, soon became foreman of the 



CLINTON COUNTY, TOWA. 975 

office, then local editor and later manager. He thus learned all branches 
of the business, being a practical printer, as well as having served in editorial 
capacities. In 1883 he purchased the Advertiser from its proprietor, and 
carried on the business as sole proprietor until 1885, when his brother, 
Clarence A. (see his sketch) joined him, and the firm of Fay Brothers was 
then organized. This firm has since published the paper, and have given 
their close attention to it. The growth of the paper in circulation and 
volume of advertising and reading matter has been remarkable. In 19 10 
the CI in toil Daily Advertiser had a sworn circulation of over eleven thous- 
and, and its publishers guarantee that its circulation is greater than that of 
all the other Clinton county papers combined. The Advertiser has taken a 
prominent part in the discussion of local affairs, has been on the people's side 
and led fights for them, notably for lower gas and pure water. Though pub- 
lished in Lyons, the Advertiser was a strong supporter of annexation to Clin- 
ton, and led that successful fight. It is a strong Democratic organ, and is 
veiy energetic in discussion of political matters during campaigns, but at other 
times is quiet, the aim of its publishers being to carry on a good newspaper 
rather than to be the mouthpiece of a political organization. The Advertiser 
took a leading part in the prosecution of a gang of thieves who were working 
in Clinton and other parts of the state from 1902 to 1905, and thus broke up 
the gang. 

Mr. Fay is active in Democratic politics, was chairman of the congres- 
sional committee for several years, and was a candidate for elector on the 
Democratic state ticket in 1905. He is a member of the Masons, the Eastern 
Star, the Elks, the Eagles, the Mystic Workers, the Woodmen of the World, 
the Modern Woodmen of America, and of the Royal Neighbors. He is presi- 
dent of the corporation of Fay Brothers, vice-president of the Citizens Build- 
ing Association. 

Louis E. Fay was married on February i, 1888, to Amelia Gottlob 
Thomas, the daughter of Paulina Gottlob Thomas of Lyons. To this mar- 
riage three children have been born: Horace Amsden, on November 12, 
1888; Carl Harding, on November 16, 1890, both now working in the Ad- 
vertiser office; and Louis E., Jr., born January 5, 1903. 

Mr. Fay is a thorough type of the indomitable and determined man of 
brains and ability, who goes about affairs with the intention to succeed, and 
does so. 



9/6 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

MARSHALL SPRING BIDWELL GAGE. 

The name of Marshall Spring Bidwell Gage will long be remembered in 
Clinton county, for he was for years a prominent figure in business circles and 
in the life of the city of Lyons and vicinity, and his character was such as to 
commend him to the youth of the land who desire to make the most of their 
chances in all circles. By his courage and energy he climbed steadily and 
persistently and stood firmly upon each round of the ladder until he could 
reach the next above and plant himself thereon. He won the confidence of all 
with whom he came into contact and had no difficulty in retaining the same, 
for his course was always honorable, steadfast and trustworthy and he had 
friends by the score wherever he was known. 

Mr. Gage was born in Burlington, Ontario, Canada, August 25, 1837. ^^'^^^ 
he came of an old family of sterling worth, being the son of James Philip and 
Alary Jane (Davis) Gage. The father was born on June 10, 1810, in Can- 
ada; his wife was also born in that Dominion, and they were reared, educated 
and married there, and came to Jackson county, Iowa, in 1854, where they 
remained four years, coming to Clinton county, Iowa, in 1858, locating in 
Lyons. Here the father erected what is known as the Gage block and there 
established a grocery store. He became prominent in business circles here 
and. with the Rands and others, established the First National Bank at Lyons, 
and he was the first president of that noted institution, his judicious manage- 
ment of its affairs being largely responsible for its rapid development. In 
1873 he established the Farmers and Citizens Savings Bank, now known as 
the Merchants National Bank. He had a genius for organizing and promot- 
ing such institutions, was a man of keen discernment and figured prominently 
in large business affairs, — in fact, was for years looked upon as a leader in 
business circles and was one of the prominent men of this city. He was a 
man of pleasing address, a good mixer and everybody liked him. He was 
independent in politics. His death occurred on April 2, 1883. 

James P. Gage was married to Mary Jane Davis on November 24. 1836, 
and this union resulted in the birth of one child. IMarshall S. B., of this re- 
view. His first wife having passed to her rest on February 7, 1857. James 
P. Gage was again married in 1858. his last wife being Helen Julia Buck, of 
Canada, and this union resulted in the birth of three children. 

Marshall S. B. Gage was reared on a farm in Canada and he built up a 
robust constitution by work in the fields. He received a good education, which 
was subsequently augmented by actual contact with the business world and 
by continued home reading. He came to Lyons, Iowa, With his parents in 




MARSHALL S. B. GAGE 



THE NEW t-OM 






CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 977 

,1858, and he began his business career by clerking for a period of ten years 
in his father's grocery store. He then went into the First National Bank of 
Lyons for the purpose of learning the banking business, and by close applica- 
tion he made rapid progress and in 1873 was cashier of the Farmers and 
Citizens Savings Bank. He became well known in banking circles and by 
his careful attention to business and his integrity and pleasing manners he 
was popular with all the patrons of these institutions. Owing to ill health 
Mr. Gage found it necessary to retire, and his death occurred on February 4, 
1891. The latter years of his life he devoted, very largely, to travel for 
health and pleasure. Politically he was a Democrat, and in fraternal matters 
he was a Alason and belonged to the Knights of Honor. 

Mr. Gage was married on August 12, 1857, to Agnes Graham, daughter 
of Henry Ferguson and Agnes (Rosenbarger) Graham, a highly respected 
and well known family. Mrs. Gage was born on January 27, 1841, in Water- 
down, Ontario, Canada. Her parents were old settlers of Jackson county, 
Iowa, where they spent the latter part of their lives and where they died. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Gage six children were born, three of whom are now living, 
namely: Carrie, wife of Virtus Lund, Jr.; Frank, of Lyons; and Mira, wife 
of O. D. Earon, of Chicago. 

The Gage residence at No. 704 South Fifth street, Lyons, is a commodi- 
ous and attractive one and is known to the many friends of the family as a 
place of old-time hospitality. 



. HENRY DIERKS. 



A descendant of an old and prominent family of Clinton county and a 
man who has long been regarded as one of the leading agriculturists and stock 
men of Deep Creek township is Henry Dierks, a man who believes in doing 
everything well that is worth doing at all, consequently he has succeeded. 

Mr. Dierks was born in Hampshire township, Clinton county, Iowa. 
July 26, 1859. was reared to farmer's pursuits and was educated in the district 
schools. He is a son of John and Catherine (Lass) Dierks, both born in 
Germany, where they were married and remained until five children were born. 
In 1848 they emigrated to America in a sailing vessel, and after a long voy- 
age, finally landed at New York and came direct to Lyons, Iowa, where John 
met a brother, Peter Dierks. Soon afterward he rented a farm, in the cultiva- 
(62) 



9/8 CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 

tion of which he was successful. A few years later he bought a farm in 
Hampshire township and settled there, and later added and owned eight hun- 
dred acres, and engaged in general farming and raising stock, also feed for the 
market. His first purchase was mostly timber land. He bought raw land, 
which he cleared and improved. He was successful and was always proud 
of his adopted land. He was a Republican and filled some school offices, but 
did not aspire to political preferment. He never returned to his native 
country. He was social and charitable to the afflicted and was a good neigh- 
bor and friend, was well known and highly respected, his integrity and honor 
being above reproach. He died in 1897; his wife died about 1887. Relig- 
iously, they were Lutherans. Their children were : Hans, a retired farmer at 
Ringwood, Clinton county, Iowa ; Anna, Mrs. Christ Lueders ; John, a farmer 
at Lyons, retired ; Detliff was a farmer, retired, and died in July, 1909, leaving 
a wife and five children; Katie, Mrs. George Agger; Peter is a farmer on 
the old homestead ; Henry, of this review. 

The subject was born in this county and remained under. the parental 
roof until he was married in 1881, and he remained on the home farm until 
1890, when he bought the improved farm where he now resides, two hun- 
dred and sixty acres at fifty-eight and one-half dollars per acre. He has re- 
modeled the farm and put it in convenient shape for cultivation, all under 
fence and in grass. He cultivates about one hundred acres. He carries on 
general farming and raises stock of all kinds of a good class, feeds and ships 
cattle to the Chicago market. He has remodeled and enlarged his home, 
which stands on a natural elevation surrounded by forest and fruit trees, 
cement walks and yard. He has erected a large barn and now has two or 
three barns and many outhouses for various purposes, and has a finely im- 
proved, farm. in a high state of cultivation. He has used his surplus money 
in his farm business. He is a stockholder in the Goose Lake Bank. He is 
independent in politics, having voted both tickets, he claiming the right to 
vote for the man of his choice. He has never aspired to office, but has filled 
some school offices. He is rearing and educating his children to be upright 
citizens. 

Mr. Dierks married Lena Rix, who was born in Hampshire township 
in 1867, a daughter of George Rix, of Germany, who came to America about 
1858, locating in Clinton county; he was a wagonmaker by trade, which he 
followed and worked at the Six Mile House, this county, where he has a com- 
fortable home. He still does some work at his trade. He is a Republican 
and well posted in all public afifairs, and has filled some township offices. He 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 979 

has given most of his time and attention to his trade, and does not aspire 
to office or pubhc notoriety, being a quiet, honest mechanic, well known and 
highly respected for his sterling integrity and honor. His wife yet survives, 
she being sixty-three and he seventy years of age. He served through the 
Civil war as a private and saw much hard service and underwent many dep- 
rivations and hardships, as was meted out to soldier life. 

The following children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Rix : Helena, wife of 
the subject: Emma married Gustaf Werner and she died in 1907; Ida, Bertha, 
Anna and Katie all died young; Theodore is a farmer; Dora, Mrs. John 
Harmsen ; Henry is a coal dealer. To Mr. and Mrs. Dierks six children have 
been born, Emil, Alford, Lewis, Ernest, Mata and Gustave, all at home. 



MYRON C. MUDGE. 



Among the well known and highly respected citizens of Welton township, 
Clinton county, is Myron C. Mudge, a man who has lived a life consistent 
with high ideals and who has made a success of his chosen vocation because 
he has applied himself very carefully to whatever he has had in hand. 

Mr. Mudge was born on July 24, 1848, in Poultney, Vermont. He is 
the son of Nathan and Elza (Prior) Mudge, the father a native of Plymouth, 
Vermont, born there on November 8, 1800, and the mother born on May 16, 
1803. They were married in 1829, and became the parents of nine children, 
six of whom are living. The parents of Mr. Mudge came to Jones county, 
Iowa, in 1854, locating on a farm, and here the fathers death occurred on 
November 11, 1863, and the death of his wife occurred at St. Joseph, Mis- 
souri, in about 1880. She had been making her home with her eldest daugh- 
ter there and was buried at Burlington, Iowa. In politics Nathan Mudge 
was a Whig originally and later a Republican. He and his family were Free- 
Will Baptists and were known as people of the greatest probity of character. 

Myron C. Mudge was reared on a farm and educated in the public schools. 
He came to Clinton county, Iowa, in 1864, and here he was married to 
Clemena C. Hull, a native of Milton, Wisconsin, and the daughter of Elder 
Varnnm Hull, a minister in the Seventh-Day Baptist church. His wife was 
known in her maidenhood as Malinda Larkin, and she is still living, having 
attained the ripe old age of ninety-three years. She has been a remarkable 
woman, possessed of many splendid attributes of character. Mr. Hull's death 



980 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

occurred at Rock River, Wisconsin. To Mr. and Mrs. Mudge three children 
have been born, namely : Hattie Odessa, Leola Marcia, deceased, and May 
Evaline. 

Mr. Mudge has been a farmer much of his life and he has been very 
successful as such a worker. He had eighty acres of land in Welton town- 
ship, and in 1889 he moved to North Welton and engaged in the mercantile 
business, which he continued with ever-increasing success, building up a large 
and satisfactory patronage with the people of this vicinity as a result of his 
honest dealing and his desire to please his customers. 

Politically, Mr. Mudge is a Republican and while he has never found 
time to mingle in political affairs to a large extent, he has shown that he is 
deeply interested in local matters, and he has been school director for a num- 
ber of years. He and his family are members of the Seventh-Day Baptist 
church and very faithful in their allegiance to the same. They have a nice 
home here and the entire family is highly respected throughout this locality. 



CALVIN H. GEORGE. 

The inevitable law of destiny accords to tireless energy and industr}^ a 
successful and honorable career, and in no field of endeavor is there greater 
opportunity for advancement than that of the law, a profession whose votaries, 
if distinguished, must be endowed with native talent, rectitude of character, 
singleness of purpose and broad general knowledge. Calvin H. George, of 
Clinton, Iowa, fully meets all these requirements of his chosen profession 
and stands today among the leading lawyers of his city and is justly esteemed 
as one of the foremost attorneys of eastern Iowa, and yet he is a plain, un- 
assuming gentleman who does not court publicity, merely striving to do his 
duty well in all the relations of life. 

Mr. George was born at Garden Plain, Whiteside county, Illinois, Janu- 
ary 14, 1862. He is the son of Daniel F. and Mary Jane (Mitchell) George, 
the father a native of Conway, New Hampshire, and the mother of Ohio. 
The maternal grandfather. David Mitchell, was a pioneer of Whiteside county, 
Illinois, and was the foreman of the first grand jury ever held in Wliiteside 
county, and was the first county treasurer of that county. Daniel F. George 
was also a pioneer farmer of Whiteside county, Illinois. He. soon after com- 
ing west, was pilot of a vessel which plied between Chicago and St. Joseph, 




CALVIN H. GEORGE 



'IHE NEW WM. 



-\?T,'^R. lENOX, AND 

JDUi4DATI0N3 

ji I, 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 981 

Michigan. He was esteemed for his many kind and charitable acts and honor- 
able character. In the early days he hauled his grain from Garden Plain to 
Chicago with an ox team and underwent the hardships incident to the life of 
a pioneer and was known for his great courage and fortitude. 

Calvin H. George grew to maturity on the home farm. He attended the 
county schools during the winter months, then went to Drake University of 
Iowa, and later took a course at the Valparaiso (Indiana) University, from 
which institution he graduated. Thus well equipped for what the poets would 
call the battle of life, he began his career by teaching in the county schools, 
but, having an ambition to enter the legal profession, he left the school room 
and began the study of law, reading law while teaching school. His preceptors 
were I. R. Andrews and Hon. A. R. McCoy, of Clinton, Iowa. Mr. George 
having located in Clinton county when a young man, was admitted to the bar 
in 1888, bv the supreme court of Iowa and the United States courts licensed 
him to practice in all courts. Since that time his record has been one of suc- 
cesses such as few attain. He opened an office in the Toll block, and he has 
been continuously in the practice here since, building up a large, constantly 
growing and lucrative practice and taking a high rank among his professional 
brethren of eastern Iowa, being a diligent student of all phases of juris- 
prudence and a vigorous, energetic and independent thinker and an investi- 
gator, accurate, painstaking and conscientious. He is uniformly courteous to 
the court and lenient with his opponents, and he is an earnest, logical and 
forceful, often eloquent, pleader at the bar, never failing to impress forcibly 
his hearers. 

Recognizing his ability and his interest in the welfare of the city and 
county, he was called by the people to serve them one term as city attorney 
and three terms as county attorney, performing his duties in a manner that 
reflected credit upon himself and to the satisfaction of the citizens, irrespective 
of party. He is a member of the library board, and fraternally he belongs to 
the Masonic order, the Knights of Pythias, the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

The domestic life of Mr. George began when he led to the hymeneal altar 
a lady of talent, culture and character, known in her maidenhood as Goldie R. 
Reno, of Marengo, Iowa, daughter of Col. B. F. Reno and a representative of 
a distinguished family of army officers. To this union eight children have 
born born, one dying in infancy, those now living being: Dorothy A., Helen 
M., Elizabeth M., Daniel V., David B., Margaret R. and Ruth A., all attend- 
ing the public schools in Clinton. 



982 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

HENRY C. VOSS. 

A descendant of one of the early and prominent families of Clinton 
county is Henry C. Voss, a man who has won success in life because he has 
worked for it along legitimate lines, believing in employing twentieth century 
methods in all his undertakings. 

Mr. Voss was born in Clinton county, October i, 1864, and was reared 
on a farm and educated in the district schools. He is a son of Fritz and 
Cathrena Voss. both natives of the province of Holstein, Germany. They 
came to America at different times, when single, and married in New York. 
They came to Clinton county, Iowa, in 1862 and for two years he was em- 
ployed at such labor as he could find to do, then rented land and engaged in 
farming. He came, as did most of the people from his countiy, very short of 
means, so hard work, which had no terrors for him, fell to him. After rent- 
ing a farm for a number of years, successfully saving his earnings, he bought 
eighty acres of land which had poor improvements and a small amount of 
which was in cultivation. But he soon put it in better shape and kept working 
hard, early an4 late, and he later added to the land until he owned two hun- 
dred acres. He put it all under fence and about one hundred acres in culti- 
vation; the remainder he left to grass. The entire farm was susceptible to 
cultivation. He did a general farming business and raised live stock, and 
fed for the market each year over two car loads, shipping them to Chicago 
market. He gave his attention to the farm and its products and was very 
successful. It took nerve and determination to accomplish what he did, but 
he was equal to the occasion. He underwent all the deprivations and hard- 
ships of an early settler, and by hard work, honest dealing and good financing 
he was rewarded with success and created a good estate. He was a strong 
Democrat, but never aspired to office. He was reared in- the Lutheran church, 
from which faith he has never departed. He was well posted in all business 
matters and politics, a broad-minded and intelligent business man, a good 
financier and well known and highly respected, his integrity and honor being 
above reproach. He died Februaiw 23, 1901, aged sixty-six years. His wife 
yet survives and finds a good home among her children, mostly with her son, 
the subject of this sketch. She is now seventy-two years old. She was 
reared in and has always affiliated with the Lutheran church. She has six 
children, viz: Augusta, Mrs. H. Dorman, who died and left three children; 
Henry C, of this review: Anton is running the Tenth Mile house, and is a 
popular man; Ella, Mrs. John Neave : Frances, Mrs. John Dick; Johanna, 
Mrs. F. Passic. 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 983 

Henry C. Voss, of this review, remained tinder the parental roof until he 
was twenty-eight years old, when he married. He was young when his father 
moved to the homestead, and there he grew to manhood, helping his father on 
the farm. When twenty-eight years old he married, in the year 1893, then 
rented the homestead farm one year, after which he rented another farm and 
moved on to it. He remained a renter on that farm for five years, then again 
rented the homestead for three years. In 1902 he bought out the interests 
of the other heirs and has since successfully carried forward the work inaugu- 
rated by his father, general farming and raising and feeding of live stock for 
the market; he ships to the Chicago market. He has invested some of his 
surplus in the Goose Lake Bank stock, but gives most of his attention to the 
farm and its products. Politically he is a stanch Democrat in local politics, 
though he reserves the right to vote for the man of his choice. He was 
brought up in the Lutheran church, from which faith he has never departed. 
He has made considerable improvement on his farm, has erected another large 
bam and keeps all buildings in good repair and the farm in a high state of 
cultivation. The house is a large two-story frame, situated on a natural ele- 
vated site, beautiful with forest and fruit trees. He has added to the sanitary 
conditions, by a spacious lawn and cement sidewalks around the house and 
yard; he has also put in a large amount of tiling on the farm, to aid in the 
agricultural development of the same. He is a practical and successful farmer 
and stock handler, and among the well known and highly respected citizens 
of Deep Creek township. 

Mr. Voss married Emma Andersen, who was born in Clinton county, 
Iowa, in 1870, daughter of Casper Andersen, an early settler and a promi- 
nent farmer from Germany, province of Holstein ; his wife, Johanna Schlem- 
mer, was also a native of Germany. The family were early settlers in Clinton 
county. The father came with limited means and rented and farmed a few 
years, then bought one hundred and twenty acres of land in Hampshire town- 
ship. It was a small and poorly improved farm, but he was energetic and 
made substantial improvements and was a good farmer and hard worker. 
He remained there during the rest of -his life, and died on March 6, 1908. 
He was a member of the Lutheran church and a Democrat in politics. He 
followed general farming, raising live stock for the market, and by hard work 
and honest dealing created a competency for his old age. His wife survived 
him and makes her home with a daughter. Mr. Andersen had one son and 
four daughters by a previous marriage. His son Henry owns and runs a 
grist mill and handles lumber at Bryant. By his last marriage the following 



984 CLINTON county;, IOWA. 

children were born; Emma, wife of the subject; Laura, Mrs. George Bach; 
Alvina. Mrs. John Brett; Mattie, Mrs. H. Dierks; Adolph, who hves on the 
old homestead. The union of Mr. and Mrs. Voss has been blessed with the 
following children; Malinda, born November 20, 1893, is at home; George, 
born February 22, 1895; Augusta, born March 25, 11897; Lucinda, born 
September 30, 1900; Loretta, born June 17, 1902; Hannah, born March 3, 
1904; Henry, born April 21, 1906, and Alma, born June 5, 1908. 



CAPT. JOSEPH D. FEGAN. 

Among the leading citizens of Clinton is numbered Capt. Joseph D. 
Fegan, who for many years was successfully engaged in the abstract and 
real estate business in this city. He was born in Franklin county, Pennsyl- 
vania, July 26, 183 1, receiving a common school education. His father served 
in the war of 181 2-14 in the Pennsylvania Volunteers and died in 1842, 
leaving a widow and family, the subject of this sketch being eleven years old. 
His mother soon thereafter died, leaving him to care for himself. In 1849 
he emigrated to Clinton county, Iowa, and followed the trade of a tailor, but 
at the commencement of the Rebellion he was engaged in the lumber and 
grain business at Wheatland, Iowa. In the meantime, however, he married 
Anne M. Potts, whose father had served in the Black Hawk war, and whose 
grandfather was an officer of the regular army in 1779. 

As soon as Mr. Fegan could put his business in proper shape to leave, 
he entered the service as a private in Company I, Twenty-sixth Iowa Infantry, 
August 12. 1862. He was promoted sergeant and then sergeant-major, 
September 12, 1862, and mustered in September 30, 1862. He was appointed 
first lieutenant and regimental adjutant on the field at the battle of Arkansas 
Post, January 11, 1863, and promoted captain of Company B, January 15, 
1864. to rank from June 12, 1863. The regiment served at Helena, Arkansas, 
under General Hovey, to December, 1862, and was then assigned to the Third 
Brigade, Fourth Division (Steele's) of Sherman's right wing of the Thirteenth 
Army Corps. In January, 1863, it was transferred to the Third Brigade, 
First Division, Fifteenth Corps, and in November, 1863, formed part of the 
First Brigade, First Division, Fifteenth Corps, where it remained until Febru- 
ary, 1865. 

Captain Fegan served with the regiment in various expeditions from 
Helena, and in General Sherman's Yazoo expedition, participating in the en- 




O' - D . F'E Gy\Nr 



:;lBuA.ii'^. 






CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 985 

gagements at Chickasaw Bayou and Chickasaw Bkiffs, from December 26-29, 
1862. He then took part in the expedition to Arkansas Post, and was engaged 
in the assauU and capture of Fort Hindman, January lo-ii, 1863. After 
several other expeditions he returned with his regiment to Milhken's Bend, 
Louisiana, and in April. 1863. started on the campaign, with the Fifteenth 
Corps, which terminated in the capture of Vicksburg, Mississippi, having 
been engaged at Turkey Creek ; Jackson, Mississippi ; Champion Hills, Baker's 
Creek, crossing of the Big Black River, attack on Vicksburg. May 18. and 
in the assault. May 19-22. 1863. After the surrender, started with the ad- 
vance against Johnston's army, participating in the siege of Jackson and 
Brandon, Mississippi. 

In September the regiment was transferred to Memphis by boat, and 
marched to Chattanooga, participating in the engagements and battles around 
that place from November 23-27; Lookout Mountain, November 24; Mission- 
ary Ridge. November 25 ; and Ringgold. November 27. at which last-named 
place he was slightly wounded, but remained on duty. He participated in 
the Atlanta campaign from May until September. 1864. and was engaged at 
Snake Creek Gap, Resoca, Adairsville, Dallas, Pumpkin-vine Creek, Altoona, 
New Hope Church. Ackworth. Kenesaw Mountain. Big Shanty, Nickajack 
Creek, Chattahoochie River, Bald Hill, Atlanta. Ezra Chapel. Jonesborough. 
Lovejoy's Station, and pursuit of Hood's army into Alabama, being engaged 
at Kingston and Ship Gap. He participated in the "March to the Sea," and 
engaged in the siege of Savannah, Georgia. He performed the duties of act- 
ing assistant adjutant-general. First Brigade, First Division, Fifteenth Corps, 
from November 7. 1864. to January 21, 1865. He was commissioned as cap- 
tain and assistant adjutant-general February 3. 1865. and participated in the 
march tlirough the Carolinas. and all the actions consequent thereon, up to the 
surrender of Johnston's army. He also marched with Sherman's army to 
Washington City, and participated in the Grand Review. 

Captain Fegan was transferred to Louisville. Kentucky, and then to Lit- 
tle Rock, Arkansas, where he was mustered out September 19, 1865. Captain 
Fegan counts as one of his valuable possessions his commission, signed by 
President Lincoln and Secretary of War E. M. Stanton, which promoted him 
from a line captain to a position on the staff as assistant adjutant-general of 
volunteers. 

After the war Captain Fegan returned to Clinton and became county 
recorder, holding such office four years. He has always been prominent in 
social circles, being a member of N. B. Baker Post No. 88. Grand Army of 



986 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

the Republic, of Clinton, the military order of the Loyal Legion of the United 
States; the Society of the Army of the Tennessee and for sixty years has 
been an honorary member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

On coming to Iowa he had only a five-franc piece and the prosperity 
which he has enjoyed and the success of which his wife and three children- are 
proud has been due entirely to his own unaided efforts. 



DESCARTES L. PASCAL. 

The name of Descartes L. Pascal, successful agriculturist, stock raiser 
and seed corn specialist, of Orange township, Clinton county, Iowa, has been 
circulated broadcast, in a way, throughout the United States. His motto has 
always been to do well whatever was worth doing at all, and this has, no doubt, 
been largely responsible for his pronounced success along the lines to which 
he has turned his attention. He is deserving in every way of the esteem ac- 
corded him by all who know him, for he has ever sought to bear aloft the un- 
tarnished escutcheon of an honored family name. 

Mr. Pascal was born August 18, 1870, four miles east of De Witt. Clin- 
ton county, and in the fall of that year he was brought to the farm on which 
he now lives and which has been his place of abode most of his life. When, 
fifteen years of age he left school and spent two summers in western Iowa. 
He is the son of George W. Pascal and wife, an excellent old family of this 
township. He enjoyed the advantages of a liberal education, having attended 
school at Grand Mound and De Witt, graduating from the high school at 
the latter place. After he became of age he went to western Iowa, where for 
a year he followed photography. Then he spent one term in Cornell College, 
at Mt. Vernon, Iowa, preparing to enter the Michigan State University at 
Ann Arbor, where he expected to study mechanical engineering. In 1893 he 
was employed on the fair grounds of the Columbian Exposition (World's 
Fair) at Chicago, as a Columbian Guard. The following year he taught 
school and in the fall he started for Ann Arbor, Michigan, where he expected 
to enter the university to take up mechanical engineering. On his way he 
stopped at the old home to see his parents for a few days. His father was 
taken ill and requested him to remain at home, which he did. The father's 
illness proved fatal, and so, for the time being, the subject gave up his plans 
for education in order to remain with his mother and sisters at the old home, 
expecting to, at some future time, complete his collegiate studies. But, like 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA, 987 

many others, he sacrificed his ambition for education in order that the old 
home might still be home for his mother. 

Mr. Pascal formerly operated four hundred and ten acres of land, to 
which he has recently added sixty-three acres. He has been engaged in gen- 
eral farming on his fine tract of land for the past sixteen years, and by hard 
work and persistent application, coupled with sound judgment and an ana- 
lytical mind, he has achieved the success which is always the reward of the de- 
serving. In 1902 Mr. Pascal became interested in corn breeding and has 
demonstrated to the world the great value of corn breeding. In making a 
specialty of seed corn culture, he chiefly raised "Reid's Yellow Dent," which 
is eagerly sought for owing to the high quality of his seed. He has shipped 
seed corn to over twenty-five states of the Union and even to the Transvaal 
agricultural department of South Africa. In 1903 he produced the best ear of 
corn in Iowa, which won the Cook trophy. Aalued at fifteen hundred dollars, 
awarded at Ames, Iowa, for the best ear of corn. In 1906 he raised an ear of 
corn which was exhibited at Ames, Iowa, in January, 1907, and which won 
the first prize, and which sold at public auction for one hundred and fifty dol- 




lars, or at the rate of eight thousand eight hundred and fifty dollars a bushel. 
This is the more remarkable when it is remembered that the highest priced ear 
ever sold before only bix>ught eleven dollars. This wonderful ear of corn was 
exhibited in December. 1907, at the national corn show at Chicago as champion 
of the world, being recognized as the finest ear ever exhil^ited. By request, it 
was also exhibited at the national corn show held at Omaha, Nebraska, in 
December. 1908. It has been exhibited throughout the United States. Mr. 
Pascal had formerly won numerous prizes at exhibitions and he has won a 
wide reputation in this way. He is also a successful breeder of shorthorn 
cattle. 

Mr. Pascal is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and. 
politically, he is a Republican. The extensive business in which he is engaged 
is under the firm name of D. L. Pascal & Sisters, the latter being Lucy A., 
who makes her home on the farm with her brother and mother, and Laura T., 
a teacher of Gennan in the public schools of Lakewood, Ohio, both being 
ladies of education, business tact and culture. 



988 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

GILBERT LAWRENCE TEMPLE. 

One rarely finds two persons in every-day life who attribute their suc- 
cess in their different spheres to similar qualities. Hard work and plodding 
industry paved the way for one, good judgment and a keen sense of values 
for another, intuition and a well balanced mind for the third. An admixture 
of the qualities mentioned above, with others, emphasized by close application, 
was responsible for the success of Gilbert Lawrence Temple, the late well 
known and popular photographer of Clinton, Iowa, in his battle for the spoils 
of victory. 

Mr. Temple was the scion of a sterling family of the old Buckeye state, 
and he himself was born in Delaware county, Ohio, on November 4, 1852. 
He was the son of Gilbert and Rebecca (Thatcher) Temple. The father, a suc- 
cessful farmer and school teacher, died in 1862, He was a Republican and a 
member of the Presbyterian church. His widow survived him until 1874. 
They were the parents of five children, four of whom are now living. 

Gilbert L. Temple, of this review, received an excellent education in the 
common schools and at Otterbein University, where he learned the art of 
photography, having always manifested a tendency toward the esthetics, so 
he made rapid progress in this line and won the admiration of his colleagues 
and instructors for high-grade work in his chosen vocation. He located at 
Beloit, Wisconsin, in 1869, where he remained about a year, then went to 
Cleveland, Ohio, and later to Clinton, Iowa, in 1873. where he re- 
mained, having built up a very satisfactory patronage and won a wide repu- 
tation for a grade of work second to none, his customers often coming 
from remote parts of the country. He always kept fully abreast of the 
times on all matters pertaining to his art. 

Foliticall}', ^Ir. Teni'^l" '-as a Republican, and in religions matters an 
Episcopalian. He was prominent in Masonic circles, having attained the 
thirty-second degree. He was also a member of the Benevolent and Protec- 
tive Order of Elks. His death occurred on Alay 9, 1911. 

Mr. Temple was married on September 9, 1872, to Eliza Smith, a native 
of Canada and the representative of a family of sterling worth. This union 
has been graced by the birth of two children, Ruth, the wife of Charles S. 
Knox, of Cedar Rapids, and Edith, wife of Daniel G. Swannell, of Champaign, 
Illinois. 



WILLIAM C. KUEHN. 

William C. Kuehn was born in Deep Creek township, Clinton county, 
Iowa, in 1870, a son of Christian and Elizabeth (C'ook) Kuehn. Christian 




GILBERT L. TEMPLE 



l.'.V YORK 

•IJ^UARY 



A>>u % LKNOK, AiJD 
TILPFX FOrNDATlONS 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 989 

was born in the city of Burg, on the island of Famen, which is a part of Den- 
mark, ctnd has since been annexed to the German empire. EHzaljeth was born 
in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. Christian came to America in 1852, when 
about nineteen years of age, located in Clinton county, and took up farming. 
He owned a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in De Witt township at the 
date of his death. He was the father of five children, three of whom are 
still living. He was a Lutheran, his wife a ^lethodist. Tn politics he was a 
Republican and held various township offices. He always took an acti\e inter- 
est in local affairs and whatever was good for the community. 

William C. Kuehn attended the common school and has followed farming 
since boyhood. He is a general farmer, and his place is in a very high state 
of cultivation, well improved, and its fertility kept up by raising stock. He 
entered into the marriage relation with Emma Osterberg, in 1895. Their 
union has been blessed by the birth of four children, ^Myrtle, Stella, Ira and 
Lester, all living, healthy and active in mind and body. 

Tn politics Mr. Kuehn is a Republican, and in his fraternal relation, a 
member of the Knights of Pythias, of the Odd Fellows and of the Modern 
W^oodmen, and in his life puts into practice their principles. He is a citizen 
of stanch and sturdy character and a farmer of ability and skill. He has illu- 
strated the truth of the fact that to win success in farming, as in any other 
business, requires careful management. Nowhere else is there a better or 
more paying field for the application of systematic business methods, than in 
the management and conducting of a farm ; the farmer who raises the largest 
crops is not always the most successful, nor does he alwavs make the most 
money. A farmer must apply a great deal of study into the conditions of 
profits, just as a modern business man does, in order to make his land more 
profitable and bring the greatest return for the labor expended. It requires 
that he eradicate many small wastes, and he has got to reduce the expenses of 
cultivation and maintenance to a minimum. This can only be done bv close 
attention and application, and of which the farm of Mr. Kuehn's is evidence 
of having received. 



MICHAEL J. SPAIN. 

Among the prominent farmers and early settlers of Clinton county, 
Iowa, mention must not be omitted of Michael J. Spain, a man of such 



990 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

correct habits and methods that he would doubtless have succeeded in what- 
ever locality he desired to cast his lot, coming as he did from a sturdy- 
northern family who were not accustomed to be discouraged at difficulties 
or obstacles. He was born in Lower Canada, September 29, 1846, but 
he has spent the major part of his life in Iowa, having been brought here 
when five years of age. Here he grew to maturity and was educated in 
the common schools, having been reared on his fathers farm, which he 
helped to clear and develop, attending the pioneer schools, which were taught 
three months each winter. He is the son of Cornelius and Margaret 
(Kenedy) Spain, both natives of county Tipperary, Ireland, where they 
grew to maturity and were married and where they began life on a farm. 
They left the Emerald Isle for America in 181 5, landing in New York 
City, soon afterward going to Troy, that state, where they remained one 
year, then went to South Bend, Indiana, where they remained one year, 
then to Canada. There Mr. Spain bought land which he improved and 
continued to reside there over twenty years, having a good farm and a 
comfortable home. In 1851 he sold out and came to Chicago, Illinois, 
later went to ]\Iilwaukee, Wisconsin. Not liking Wisconsin, after visiting 
various parts of the same, he crossed the Father of Waters, reaching 
Dubuque, Iowa, in June, 1851, but a few days later went to Minnesota, 
where he sought a location, but not liking the country, he came to Clinton 
county, Iowa, in the fall of 1851 and bought five hundred acres, erected a 
log house and soon had some of his land in cultivation. In due course of 
time he had a large and well improved farm, being very successful as a 
general farmer and stock raiser, hauling his products many miles to market 
and enduring many privations incidental to pioneer life. At that time 
there was not a physician in the county, but the settlers understood the use 
of herbs and "home remedies." 

Politically the first vote of Cornelius Spain was cast for Mr. Buchanan 
in 1856. He was at first inclined to support the Whig party, but in 1856 
joined the Democrats, to whom he remained faithful. He was a well in- 
formed man on current events, and while he used his influence for the 
party he never aspired to public life, though he filled some of the township 
offices. He was a worthy member of the Catholic church. He liked to 
be neighborly, although when he first came his "neighbors" were about 
twenty miles distant. He 'was always ready to help those in need in any 
way. and he was, indeed, a strong, useful man in his day, and was highly 
regarded by all who knew him. His death occurred on the old homestead 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 99 1 

in Octol^er. 1867. at the advanced age of eighty-six years; his widow sur- 
vived until 1884. dying when about the same age that her husband reached. 
They were a grand old couple. Cornelius Spain, it appears, was the pioneer 
of his neighborhood and was the first man to start the physical and moral 
development of the new Eldorado and helped lay tlie foundation for good 
government. Through his efforts the first missionary priest came to his 
neighborhood. Father McKenna having held mass at his house in 18^2. 
after which annual mass was served, and later regular mass in the log 
school house. Thus, for many reasons, no man is more worthy of an 
honored place in the county's history than Cornelius Spain. 

He and his ^^■ife were the parents of thirteen children, namely: Michael, 
number one. died in early life, as did also Thomas and Rhoda; Catherine. 
Mrs. Conroy; Bridget died when young; Daniel, a farmer, died in 1875; 
John, a farmer, died in 190=^; Cornelius, a farmer, died in 1S84; William, 
a farmer, died in 1888; Michael, the subject, and Mary were twins, the 
latter dying in 1848 when young; Margaret and Derias also died young. 

Michael Spain, of this review, was reared on the home farm and as- 
sisted with the work on the same when he became of proper age and 
early in life engaged in farming. When thirty-two years of age he mar- 
ried and settled at the old homestead, continuing to operate the place, carry- 
ing out the plans which his father inaugurated ; he later bought the interest 
of his brother and he has since added to his place until he now has a fine 
farm of two hundred and forty acres, all under a high st^te of cultivation, 
and he is carrying on general farming and stock raising in a manner that 
is bringing definite success. He often has as many as one hundred head 
of cattle in his pastures and feed lots, feeding and shipping about three 
car loads of cattle each year, also feeds large numbers of hogs. He has 
an excellent farm and a good group of buildings on the same. Although 
primarily a Democrat, he is inclined to be independent when it comes to 
voting. He was reared in the Catholic church and is still loyal to the 
same. 

^Ir. Spain was married on July i. 1879, to "Mary J. Britt, who was 
born in Lyons, Iowa, on September 20. 1859. and she has proven to be 
a most worthy helpmate She is the daughter of Thomas Britt, a native 
of Ireland who emigrated to New York in 1852, and who came to Lyons, 
Iowa, about 1855. He engaged in farming and contracting on railroad 
construction work and became a useful and successful man. His death 
occurred here in 1881. He was a member of the Catholic church and a 



992 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

Democrat. He filled a number of minor offices, including that of constable, 
while living at Lyons. His family consisted of three children : George died 
when young, as did also Martin; Mary J., wife of Mr. Spain of this review. 

The following children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. 
Spain : Cornelius is a farmer ; Thomas D. is an invalid ; Roger is a farmer ; 
Margaret L., Mary G., and William P. are all at home; Catherine is teach- 
ing school; Frank is a student at Dubuque. Iowa; Orretta is a student 
at the parochial school at Petersville; Marcedes is also attending the same 
school. 



JOHN B. AHRENS. 



The gentleman whose name heads this sketch is a member of an old and 
respected family of Clinton county, the earlier members of which were among 
the earliest settlers to come to the county from the fatherland of Germany, 
which has furnished to the county so many of its best citizens. The Ahrens 
were men and women of honor and character, who filled their various stations 
in life by always doing their duty, and their lives were strong forces working 
for good. Such has been the family reputation, and as yet it has not been 
tarnished by the acts of any of its representatives, while the life of John B. 
Ahrens promises to add new sheen to its luster. 

John B. Ahrens was born in Center township, Clinton county, Iowa, the 
son of John D. and Catherine (Naeve) Ahrens, on January 26, 1874. John 
D. Ahrens Was born in the province of Oldenberg, Germany, on August 29, 
1836. the son of John A. and Trinke (Dudden) Ahrens. John A. Ahrens 
was a farmer in Germany and, when an old man, retired from active labor, 
came to Clinton county, Iowa, and settled. He died on July 23, 1854, and 
his wife died on March 19, i860. 

John D. Ahrens came to Joliet, Illinois, from Germany, in 1852, and the 
next year came to Clinton county, Iowa. In i860 he located on a farm in 
Center township, finding its cultivation profitable and agreeable. He died on 
March 7, 1905. In politics he was a Democrat, and in religion a stanch ad- 
herent to the Lutheran faith of his fathers. He was much esteemed by his 
neighbors and his judgment highly regarded. In i860 he was married to 
Catherina Naeve, a daughter of John and Catherina (Peters) Naeve, born in 
Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, who bore to him ten children, five of whom are 
living. She died on July 13, 1904. 

John B. Ahrens grew up on the farm until he was ten years old when his 
parents retired and removed to Lyons in 1884 and where he attended the com- 




JOHN B. AHRENS 



' ili^ NE\V YORK 

Pli^LIC LlBlIAliY 



ASTOR, LT'NOX. .V."' 

TILDEN fOUNDATinXS 

R L 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 993 

men schools. Early attracted to the law as a profession, he pursued its study 
in the office of W. C. Grohe. In 1897 he graduated from the law department 
of Drake University, and later the same year he was admitted to the Clinton 
county bar. Since that time he has been engaged in practice, and though 
meeting the usual discouragements which beset young lawyers, has obtained a 
large amount of business, which is constantly increasing, as his abilities are 
becoming more widely recognized. In 19 10 he was elected by the Republicans 
to the office of city solicitor. Fraternally he is a member of the Knights of 
Pythias and of the Woodmen of the World, and takes an active interest in 
both. 

On July 10, 1897, Mr. Ahrens was married to Madge Taylor, of Des 
Moines, who was born in that city on June 14, 1875. She has borne to him 
four children, Alice C. and John E., now in school, and Richard H. and ]\Iary 
Jeanette. They are a very attractive and interesting family of young folks. 

Mr. Ahrens is a man of pleasing address, a forceful speaker, and has 
shown himself in the conduct of his trials and his practice to possess the 
qualifications of a strong lawyer. Personally he has gained many friends, 
all, of whom recognize his worth. He has been active in all recent enterprises 
which were concerned with the advancement of Clinton and takes much inter- 
est in all public questions. 



CARL J. CHRISTIANSEN. 

Among the most prominent farmers of \A'ashington township, which 
is one of the most fertile and best farming districts in Clinton county, 
none is better known, or has been more successful, than Mr. Christiansen, 
who in his career has Init repeated the incidents of his father's life, a man 
whose strength of character, high honor and good judgment won for him 
the respect of all who knew him. 

Carl J. Christiansen was born on April 3, 1858, in Clinton county, Iowa, 
the son of Carston and Sicka fPeyson) Christiansen, who were natives 
of Schleswisr, Germanv, and came to this countrv in 18^1. Thev landed 
at Xew Orleans, and came up the river by steamboat to Davenport, Iowa, 
where they remained for a short time, then came to Clinton county. The 
family were on the ocean sixteen weeks and of the five children, two died 
on the voyage and were buried at sea. Mr. Christiansen purchased an un- 
improved farm in section 10, Center township, improved it with buildings, 
and lived on it for several years, after wdiich he sold it to Peter Hansen, 

(63) 



994 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA, 

and purchased an improved farm in section 30 of the same township. 
Carston Christiansen spent his Hfe in general farming, and by his excellent 
business ability accumulated much property. In 1896 he retired from the 
farm and moved to Clinton, where he died on April 14. 1899, at the age 
of seventy-eight. His wife died on June 9, 1900, and both are l)uried at 
Elvira cemetery. They were members of the Lutheran church and took 
an active part in the work of the church. Of their nine children, but two, 
Carl and his brother, Martin, are living. The deceased are Anna (Mrs. 
Schroeder). Hans P., Carston N., Hannah, Lena and the two buried at 
sea. 

Carl J. Christiansen remained at home until he was eighteen, receiv- 
ing a common school education. For the greater part of the next six 
years he traveled about a good deal over the country, finding employment 
on farms mostly. At the age of twenty-four, on March 7, 1882, he was 
married to Lucy Mannsen, the daughter of John and Mergrata Mannsen, 
who came from their native Germany to the United States in 1872, and 
reared a family of five children. Mr. and Mrs. Christiansen began their 
married life in this county, and in 1883 they moved to the farm where they 
now live, consisting of two hundred and eighty acres which he purchased 
from his father. To this he has added until now he is the owner of six 
hundred acres in Clinton county. The present year Mr. Christiansen pur- 
chased two hundred and sixty acres of fertile prairie land in Arkansas, 
and has begun the cultivation of rice. This investment promises to be 
very profitable. In 1901 he erected his present home, a handsome country 
residence of eleven rooms, modern in every -way, at a cost of four thous- 
and dollars; in 1905 a large barn was erected at a cost of one thousand 
five hundred dollars, in addition to which he has other barns for feeding 
purposes. In fact, his location and his buildings are second to none in 
the township. 

Mr. Christiansen has made a success of farming and stock raising 
and is a money maker. Enterprising and public spirited, he is ever ready 
to work for the common good. In politics he is a Democrat and has 
served as trustee of his township. He and his wife are members of the 
Lutheran church. Not only has Mr. Christiansen been successful in a 
material way, but he has obtained the friendship and the respect of his 
neighbors and has found much pleasure in the society of his family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Christiansen are the parents of ten interesting children, 
all living, and most of them at home, and in school. Their names are : 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 995 

Carston N., bom on December 4, 1882; Anna M.. born on May 23, 1884; 
John M.. born on March 13, 1886; George W.. April 27, 1888; Walter C, 
September 6. 1890; Lilhan S.. November 6, 1893; Carl H.. February 10, 
1895; Ernest J.. April 22, 1897; Elma M., June 22. 1899; and Jeanette 
A., June 19, 1904. 



TRUELOVE M. CORSON. 

A well known and highly respected citizen of Clinton, Iowa, is Truelove 
M. Corson, a successful and popular contractor, who has by hard work along 
legitimate and well selected lines, advanced from a modest beginning to a 
position of influence in the business life of Clinton county, and is therefore 
deserving of a great deal of credit on the part of his fellow men, which they 
freely accord, for there has been nothing in his conduct to detract from the 
good name this family has always borne. 

Mr. Corson was born in Jasper county, Iowa, August 5, 1859, and he 
is the son of Benjamin T. and Mary E. (Sparks) Corson, the former born 
in Clark county, Ohio, July 31, 1832, and the latter was born in Iowa, Decem- 
ber iS, 1842; they were married on July 15, 1858. The paternal grand- 
father of Mr. Corson was Eli E. Corson, who was born in Ohio ; he was a 
farmer l>y occupation. Benjamin H. Corson came with his parents to Jas- 
per county, Iowa, in an early day and he entered government land there. 
Later he moved to Missouri and farmed there several years, and finallv, in 
1870, he moved to Crawford county, Iowa, where he purchased a good farm, 
which he still owns. He was always a hard working man and managed well, 
so that he has laid by a competency for his declining years and is now living 
retired at the town of Botana, Shelby county, this state. He is a man of 
fine personal characteristics, and he and his family are all members of the 
United Brethren church. The maternal grandparents were Truelove and 
Sarah Sparks, who were among the very earliest settlers in Iowa, having 
•originally come from Kentucky, descendants of the noted frontiersman, 
Daniel Boone. To Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin H. Corson the following children 
were born. Truelove M. being the oldest: Eli E., Jerry J., Ulysses S. Grant, 
Charles P. and Alberta A. (named in order of birth). 

Truelove M. Corson was educated in the common schools of Iowa and 
Missouri, his parents moving to the latter state when he was nine years old. 
He grew to maturity on a farm and worked in the fields when a boy. After 



996 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

remaining in that state six years, he returned to Crawford county, Iowa. 
He began Hfe for himself as a farmer, buying, in 1880, eighty acres of land 
in Shelby county, Iowa, and this he still owns. When a young man he also 
learned the carpenter's trade and while managing his farm he did a great deal 
of building; in fact, he did more contracting than any other man in the town 
of Botana, Iowa, for several years. In 1901 he moved to Clinton. Iowa, and 
worked for several large contractors at first, among them being John Lake. 
In 1907 he started in for himself as a contractor and has been doing a large 
and satisfactory business. He purchased a house at No. 605 Fourth avenue 
and has remodeled it into a comfortable and modern, well equipped and at- 
tractive dwelling. He is thoroughly familiar with every detail of the builder's 
art and deserves to rank high as an architect. 

Mr. Corson married, on May 13, 1880, Cornelia B. Langham, who was 
born May 18, 1858, in Clinton county, the daughter of George and Mary 
Langham, natives of England. To Mr. and Mrs. Corson two children have 
been born, Herbert Henry, born March 3, 1887, and George E., born June 
9, 1891. 

Air. Corson is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, also be- 
longs to the auxiliary, the Royal Neighbors. 



HANS FREDERICK CHRISTIAN BEHR. 

There are a conspicuously large number of German-born citizens or 
citizens of German descent in Clinton, and there are no more worthy or public 
spirited inhabitants of the city than are they. Mr. Behr was born in Ger- 
many, came as a young man to this country, and here found the opportunities 
for which he was seeking, and has lived a successful life. His many amiable 
and afifable qualities have made for him many friends among those who know 
him, all of w^hom consider him as one of the best of companions. 

Hans Frederick Christian Behr was born in Schleswig, Germany, on 
September 23, 1864, the son of Christian and Margaret Behr. Christian 
Behr was also a native of Schleswig, and came to Clinton, Iowa, in 1882, 
where he died in 1888, after making himself a welcome inhabitant of this 
his adopted country. His wife had died in Germany. 

Hans F. C. Behr received his education from the German schools, and 
was a young man of nineteen when he came to Clinton, Iowa, in 1883. Upon 
reaching the city he engaged in the furniture business, and continued in it 



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HANS F. C. BEHR 



THE N-EW Y<0^RK 

PUBLm LIBrtARY 



4gT0R, LENOX, Al^]) 
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS 

B. I, 

— — « — ,i^u — ■ < - . 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 997 

for many years. In 1907 he and F. V. Hall formed a partnership in the 
undertaking business, which continued for only a year, when Mr. Hall sold his 
interest to H. E. Bragonier. The firm is still known as the F. V. Hall Com- 
pany and has been a prosperous one. Mv. Behr is very competent in the lines 
of his profession, having graduated with Hohenschuh and Carpener of Des 
Moines, Iowa. The company possesses the best of trade fixtures and appli- 
ances, and is fully equipped for his business. 

Mr. Behr is unmarried. He is a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and has filled many important ofifices in that body. In religion 
he has adhered to the Lutheran faith of his parents. In politics he is inde- 
pendent, voting for the men whom he thinks are best fitted for the ofifices for 
which they are striving, regardless of their political affiliation. He is a gen- 
tleman of pleasant manner, and very agreeable to meet and converse with, 
while he is also a man of strong judgment in business matters. Such citizens 
as Mr. Behr are the best example of the value of immigration to this country. 



JOHN W. DUNLAP. 



Among those men of sterling attributes of character wlio have impressed 
their personality upon the community of their residence and have borne their 
full share in the upbuilding and develojDment of Clinton county, mention must 
not be omitted of John \\\ Dunlap, well known agriculturist and stock man of 
Brookfield towu'-rhip. where he has long maintain.ed his home and where he 
has exerted a strong influence for good to the entire community. He is the 
scion of a fine old Virginia family, and many of the qualities of the genteel 
Southern gentleman are paramount in his nature, which renders him popular 
with all classes of people. 

John ^^^ Dunlap was l:orn in Rockingham count}'. Virginia, on Fel:ni- 
ary Ji, 1856, and he is the son of Col. J. A\\ Dunlap, a highly honored and 
influential citizen of the Old Dominion, who was Ijorn in the same county on 
June I, 1814, and who married Agnes Phillips, also born in Rockingham 
county, that state, her birth occurring on October 30, 1816. These parents 
were married on February 23, 1832. The paternal grandfather, William 
DunFp, was a tvpe of the sterling Scotchman, having been born in the lands 
of "blue bell and heather," from which he emigrated to the United States 
in an early day and located in Virginia, where he maintained a plantation. 
His only child was the father of the subject, and he became a prosperous and 



99^ CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

successful farmer in \^irginia. He was a man of patriotic impulses and 
military in spirit and prior to the breaking out of the war between the states 
lie had begun drilling a regiment. However, he moved west before the war, 
but during the conflict commanded a regiment with much ability and courage. 
Politically, he was a Democrat and held various local offices. It was on 
January 3. 1859, that he reached Brookfield township, Clinton county. Here 
he rented land, living with his brother-in-law, J. E. Philipps, for four years, 
then bought eighty acres which he farmed until his death, November 5, 
1869. He was a man of many splendid and commendable qualities of head 
and heart and was held in the highest esteem by all who knew him. His 
wife survived him many years, dying on January 28, 1896. They were mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian church, and their family consisted of the following 
children, named in order of birth: William P., of Maquoketa, Iowa; Mrs. 
Mary E. Anderson; Mrs. Eusabia Twist, deceased; James H., deceased; A. 
N., of Maquoketa; John \V., of this review; Robert E., deceased. 

John W. Dunlap, of this review, was only three years of age when he 
accompanied his parents from Virginia to Iowa, the trip requiring fifty-one 
days, in a wagon and buggy, overland. Although too young to realize what 
it all meant, it was an interesting experience, crossing the narrow defiles of 
the Blueridge mountains, traveling rough roads through almost interminable 
forests and fording unbridged streams and camping along the route in typical 
pioneer fashion. 

John W. Dunlap grew to maturity in Clinton county and attended the 
common schools. He assisted with the work on the home fann in Brook- 
field township, which he eventually purchased and to which he has since 
added eighty acres, making a good farm of one hundred and sixty acres 
which he has kept well improved and well tilled. He has erected comfortable 
and substantial buildings. He is interested in breeding thoroughbred cattle 
and has been in the business twenty-seven years. He raises polled Durham 
cattle, which always find a very ready market owing to their superior quality. 
He is a general farmer. 

Mr. Dunlap is an ardent Democrat and has long been active in fostering 
the principles of his party. He is regarded as a leader in local matters and 
his candidacy for representative from this district in 19 10 was looked upon 
with much favor by all classes from the first, he being elected in November 
following. 

Mr. Dunlap is a member of the Methodist church at Elwood and fra- 
ternallv he belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 999 

On November 20, 1886. occurred the marriage of Mr. Dnnlap with 
Hattie Kennedy, who was born in Dubuque county, Iowa, April 4, i860, the 
daughter of Robert and Catherine Kennedy, a most excellent family. Mr. 
Kennedy came here from Pennsylvania in the earlv forties, among the pio- 
neers. He is of Scotch descent. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dunlap have no children of their own, but they have 
taken Hugh E. Clark, an orphan boy, and reared him ; he was born in London. 
He has had the very best of care and instruction in the Dunlap home. 

Mr. Dunlap is a man wdiom to know is to admire and respect. He is 
temperate in every sense of the word, a stanch friend, honorable in all the 
relations of life and his word is the same as a bond. 



JAMES OWEN BABCOCK. 

The value of lives may be measured by many standards. There is nowa- 
days far too great a tendency to measure the worth of a man by the amount 
of money which he has accumulated, and to lose sight of things which not 
onlv make a life more advantageous to the community, but make it more 
truly profitable to the one who lives it. While Mr. Babcock lives comfort- 
ablv ?n(l need not complain that he has been neglected in the things of this 
world, his life measures high in character, while many a man who has 
infinitely more of wealth falls far below him in this respect. 

James Owen Babcock was born in Clark county, Ohio, on October 30, 
1838, the son of John and Elizabeth (Hardman) Babcock, who, with other 
Seventh-Day Baptists, came to Clinton county in 1854 and located in Bloom- 
field township. John Babcock owned one hundred and sixty acres of land in 
Bloomfield township and an equal amount in Welton township. He im- 
proved the Bloomfield township farm and lived on it until his death. Of his 
family of nine children, four are living. In politics he was a Republican. 
The Babcocks have been prominently identified with the religious life of the 
Seventh-Day Baptist community at North Welton, a little band of Christians 
of a somewhat peculiar belief, who observe the seventh day as the sabbath and 
who in their daily life so exemplify their doctrines that they are among the 
mo.st peaceful and useful citizens of the community, commanding the respect 
of their neighbors of whatever creed. 

James O. Babcock received his education in the district schools. He be- 
gan early to farm in Welton township, and carried on general farming on a 



lOOO CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

one hundred and twenty acre farm there until 1885, when he removed to 
North \\'elton. the center of the Seventh-Day Baptist community. In poH- 
tics he, hke his father, was formerly a Republican, but is now a Prohibitionist. 
Though never an aspirant for office, he at one time served his township as 
trustee. He is one of the most faithful of the members of the Seventh-Dav 
Baptist church, in which he is a deacon, and his wife and familv are members 
of the same church. 

James O. Babcock was married in 11860 to Almarine Van Horn, who has 
borne to him two children, Otis W. and Bertha P. Modest and unassuming, 
of unspotted character, Mr. Babcock possesses the respect of all who know 
him. 



DAVID S. FAIRCHILD, M. D. 

In the present sketch is mentioned one who has had an exceedingly varied 
and useful professional career and one which redounds to his own credit and 
to the advancement of mankind. In his work he has been ever active, and 
in the position of exceptional opportunity which he held so long as an in- 
structor in the medical profession, he has merited much praise for the efficient 
and thorough instruction which he has given and for the high professional 
ideals which he has set before his students. 

David S. Fairchild was born in Fairfield, Vermont, on i6th of Septem- 
ber, 1847, the son of Eli and Grace Fairchild. Eli Fairchild was the son of 
David, the son of John, the son of Abraham Fairchild. who came to Redding, 
Connecticut, from Norwalk. Connecticut, in 1746. John was a soldier in the 
Revolution and family tradition says that five of his brothers were in that 
same great struggle. Such a record is possessed by few families. 

Da\"i(l was educated in the academies of Franklin and Barre, Vermont, 
studied medicine with Dr. J. O. Cromton. of Fairfield, attended medical lec- 
tures at the University of Michigan from 1866 to 1868, and graduated at 
Albany, New York, in December, 1868. He then located in High Forest, 
Minnesota, where he stayed three years. In 1872 he located in Ames, Iowa, 
and there in 1877 was appointed physician to Iowa Agricultural College. In 
1879 he was elected professor of comparative anatomy and physiology, which 
position he held until 1893, when he resigned to become state surgeon for the 
Northwestern railway. In 1897 he was appointed special examining surg-eon 
for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul railway. Back in 1882 he had been 
elected to the chair of histology and pathology in the Iowa College of Physi- 




DAVID S. FAIRCHILD, M. D. 



THE ^NEV: YORK 

Pl'BLrc LIBRAllY 



ASTOR. LENOX, AID 

TILDEN FOfUNDATlONS 

E L 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. lOOI 

cians and Surgeons at Des Moines. In 1886 he was given the chair of theory 
and practice, and later, in 1903, was elected dean. For two years previous 
to the incorporation of the institution as a part of Drake University, he was 
its president. He has given much attention to nervous and hereditary dis- 
eases. In 1874 he assisted in organizing the Central District Medical Society, 
and in 1886 was elected president. In 1895 he was elected president of the 
Iowa State Medical Society, and was also in 1898 president of the Western 
Surgical and Gynecological Association. He assisted in organizing the Iowa 
Academy of Sciences, and was chairman of the committee appointed by the 
State Medical Society to prepare a history of medicine in Iowa. In 1893 he 
came to Clinton, where he has since had an extensive practice. 

Doctor Fairchild was married on May i, 1870, to Wilhelmina C, daugh- 
ter of \Y. R. Tattersall. He is the father of one son, D. S. Fairchild. Jr., 
who practices medicine with him. Doctor Fairchild is an exceedingly busy 
man. and one who fully appreciates the responsibilities as well as the oppor- 
tunities of his profession. Personally he is a man of very high character. 



JOHN WIRTH. 

Among the old and substantial residents of Brookfield township, Clinton 
county, Iowa, is John Wirth, a native of Germany, who was born on February 
29, 1836. His parents, Martin and Therese (Bohner) Wirth, spent their 
lives in the fatherland, and of their nine children only two are living, one in 
the old country and one, the subject of this sketch, in the United States. John 
Wirth was reared on a farm, but at the age of fifteen years began learning 
the blacksmith trade, at which his son became a very proficient worker and 
which he followed at difi^erent places in his native country for a number of 
years. In 1855 he came to the United States and during the ensuing three 
years worked at his trade in Chicago, removing at the expiration of that time 
to Minnesota, where he conducted a shop for one year. He then came to 
Clinton county, Iowa, in June, and after spending three years at St. Louis, 
went to Grand Mound, where he devoted about one year to farm labor, after 
which he started a shop at DeWitt, where he followed his chosen calling until 
1865. In the meantime, 1863, he bought a farm of eighty acres and at the 
expiration of the period indicated moved to the same and from 1865 until 
i88t devoted his attention to agricultural pursuits in this locality. In the 
latter year he purchased two hundred and twenty acres of land in Brookfield 



I002 CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 

township, to which he moved about the same time and which he improved 
with good buildings and on a part of which he still resides. 

From 1 88 1 until practically retiring from active life a few years ago, 
-Mr. Wirth was one of the leading farmers and stock raisers of Brookfield 
township, also among the largest land owners, his real estate in Clinton and 
Jackson counties at one time amounting to over two thousand acres. After 
accumulating a handsome competency by his farm interests and investments, 
he divided his land among his children, retaining thirty acres for himself on 
which he is now living in comfortable and honorable retirement. Mr. Wirth 
has been very fortunate financially, and is today one of the well-to-do men 
and substantial citizens of the township in which he has long resided. In 
politics he is a prominent and influential Democrat, and as such has been 
elected from time to time to various local offices, having served his township 
as trustee, school director and in other capacities. Mr. Wirth was married 
April 27, 1863, to Mary Bolte, a native of Germany, who has borne him eight 
children, namely: Matilda, Minnie, Felix E. (died on April 24, 191 1, at the 
age of forty-two years), Alexander, Frank, Arthur, Edith and Josephine, 
the majority of whom are married, well settled in life and highly esteemed in 
their respective places of residence. Mr. Wirth is widely known throughout 
Clinton county and to a marked degree commands the respect and confidence 
of his neighbors and fellow citizens. He is a self made man in the most 
liberal meaning of the term, as he came to the county with little means, and 
the ample fortune which in due time he accumulated is the result of his own 
labors and judicious management. He is a splendid example of the intelli- 
gent and progressive German-American citizenship to which the great West 
is so largely indebted for its material growth and prosperity and his life may 
be studied with profit by the young man whose career is yet to be achieved. 

Alexander J. Wirth, second son of John and Mary Wirth, was born in 
Clinton county, Iowa, on the 3d day of March, 1871. He was reared to 
habits of industry under the excellent training of his father, received a fair 
education in the public schools of his township, and grew up familiar with the 
active duties of farm life. At the proper age he took his place in the fields 
during his minority, bore his proportionate share in the cultivation of the 
family homestead, proving industrious and helpful, and while still a mere 
youth he was able to do a man's part at almost any kind of manual labor. 
Having chosen agriculture as his life work, he bent all his energies toward 
becoming proficient in the same, and on leaving home bought two hundred 
acres of land a short distance west of Elwood, which he has greatly improved 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. IOO3 

and which, under his effective industry, is now one of the finest farms and 
among the most beautiful and desirable rural homes in the township of Brook- 
field. Mr. Wirth devotes his attention to general farming and stock raising 
and his career as an agriculturist presents a series of continued successes such 
as few attain. Industrious, energetic and possessing sound practical intelli- 
gence and mature judgment, he takes broad views of his calling and conducts 
his farm along modern lines with the result that he never fails to realize 
bountiful returns from his labors. He is a public spirited man, keenly alive 
to the best interests of his township and county, and ready at all times to lend 
his influence to all worthy measures for the general welfare. He is pro- 
nounced in his allegiance to the Democratic party, keeps well informed on the 
leading questions of the day and enters heartily into what makes for the best 
interests of his fellow men. Fraternally, he is an Odd Fellow^ belonging 
to the lodge at Lost Nation, the canton and encampment at Maquoketa and 
the Rebekah degree at Elwood, being an active and influential worker in the 
several branches of these orders. 

Mr. Wirth, in the month of November, 1894, was united in marriage 
with Clara Herkelman, whose father, Carl Herkelman, is noticed elsewhere 
in this chapter, the union resulting in the birth of four children, Raymond, 
Lester, Lela and Verda. In every relation of life Mr. Wirth is recognized 
as possessing a strong sense of tmth and justice and he discharges the duties 
of citizenship with the energy and fidelity characteristic of the broad-minded 
American who loses sight of self in his desire to uphold the honor of his state 
and nation. Of inflexible integrity and irreproachable character and actuated 
by a sincere desire to make the world better, he stands today among the most 
estimable and popular citizens of the tow-nship in which he resides. 



FRED MUELLER. 



Mention of the leading citizens of Calamus and Olive township brings 
up among the first names that of the man whose name appears above, one of 
the countv's most progressive citizens, a farmer of ability and success, and a 
careful and sagacious business man. The efforts of his life have been pros- 
pered and have been well rewarded. But as nothing can be obtained without 
expenditure, let us not think that Mr. Mueller reached his present position by 
accident, but that he obtained it as the result of his carefully guided labors, 
and in this w^ay his career is an inspiration. 



I004 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

Fred Mueller was born in Germany, September 22, 1852, the son of 
Frederick and Dora (Cook) Mueller. His parents were native Germans, 
and came to Hampton, Illinois, in 1854, and in 1865 removed to Clinton 
county. Here Mr. Mueller bought a farm of two hundred acres, but sold this 
and moved to Martin county, Minnesota, and there bought three hundred and 
twenty acres, to which he added two hundred and forty more, owning at 
death five hundred and sixty acres. He was a hard working man in early life, 
had much influence in his neighborhood, and was a man of strong Christian 
character. He was in politics a Democrat. He and his wife were members 
of the Lutheran church, and he was one of the founders of the Buena Vista 
church. They were the parents of three children, all now living. His wife 
died in Illinois in 1862, and he married later Minnie Schmaechel, who bore 
him nine children. fi\-e of whom are living. 

Fred Mueller was reared on the farm, and attended the public schools in 
Illinois and also in Clinton county. He has always liked the life on the farm, 
early took up farming for himself, and now owns three hundred and sixty 
acres just north of Calamus. In 1906 he bought the elevator at Calamus, and 
operates it in connection with his son, John F., who is a partner in the enter- 
prise under the name of Mueller & Son. They do an extensive and paying 
business. On the farm he carries on general farming and stock raising. In 
politics he is a Democrat, and has been township trustee for seven years in 
succession, and school director for twelve years. He and his family are 
Lutherans. 

Mr. Mueller was married on November 23, 1876, to Minnie Wendell, 
who was born in Rock Island county, Illinois, the daughter of Heniy Wendell, 
an early settler of Clinton county, mentioned in this work. To this union 
have been born eleven children: John. Fred (deceased). Henry, \A'illie, 
Amanda. Reinholdt, Alfred, Dora, Eddie, Ellen (deceased) and Walter. 

Mr. Mueller is a careful and successful farmer, a business man of keen- 
ness and sagacity, and in his official position well merited the trust reposed 
in him by the people. He is a friend of education, and takes great pleasure in 
his home and family. 



GEORGE W. SACKRIDER. 

This old and highly esteemed citizen, who for many years has been 
identified with the varied interests of Clinton county, and who during the try- 
ing period of rebellion upheld the honor of the National Union on the bloody 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIl! LIBPiARY 



TIT,! 'EN 1(/..NDA'-'!0NS 
R L 




GEORGE W. SACKRIDER 




MRS. JENNIE SACKRIUER 



THE NEW Y'ORK 

PUBLITC LIBRARY 



AS-'O", 
TTTJtEN iir^ 
R 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. IOO5 

field of conflict, is a native of Delaware county, Ohio, and one of six children, 
whose parents, Isaac and Nancy (Hults) Sackrider, were born in the state of 
New York. They were married about 1832, and shortly thereafter moved to 
Delaware county, Ohio, where the wife died late in the forties or early in the 
fifties. In about 185 1 Mr. Sackrider brought his family to Clinton county, 
Iowa, and settled on a farm in Brookfield township. His first purchase con- 
sisted of one hundred and sixty acres, v^diich he afterwards increased to two 
hundred, the greater part of which he cleared and improved and on which he 
lived a quiet contented life until called to his final reward, in the year 1878. 
Of his five sons and one daughter, three are living, the subject of this sketch 
being the youngest of the family. 

George W. Sackrider was born August 14. 1839, ^^^ spent the first ten 
years of his life in his native county. In 185 1 he accompanied his father to 
Clinton county, Iowa, and grew to manhood on the home farm in Brookfield 
township, attending at intervals, the meanwhile, the rural school of the neigh- 
borhood. He remained at home assisting with the work of the farm until 
1862, when he exchanged the implements of husbandry for the death dealing 
instruments of warfare, joining, in July of that year. Company I, Twenty- 
fourth Iowa Infantry, with which he se.rved until the close of the Rebellion 
in 1865. Mr. Sackrider took part in some of the most notable campaigns of 
the w^ar, first in Mississippi, where he participated in the battle of Champion 
Hill, the various engagements around Pleasant Hill, and from May 22, 1863, 
until the fourth day of the following July, was engaged in the siege of Vicks- 
burg. He shared with his comrades many of the vicissitudes of warfare and 
was in a great deal of hard fighting, but twelve of his company escaping death 
and injury in the bloody battle of Champion Hill. He also experienced much 
active service in Virginia under General Sheridan, having been in the battle 
of Cedar creek and many other engagements, and was with that distinguished 
leader when he turned defeat into victory after the celebrated ride of twenty 
miles which has helped to make his name famous. At the close of the war, he 
was discharged with a record for bravery and gallantry of which any soldier 
might well feel proud, and, returning to Clinton county, resumed the pursuit 
of agriculture on sixty acres of land in Brookfield township, given him by his 
father. 

From this modest beginning, Mr. Sackrider's progress as a farmer has 
been continuous, and he now owns a fine estate of three hundred and twenty 
acres, on which are some of the best improvements in the community, includ- 
ing an imposing modern dwelling, which in point of architectural beauty and 



I006 CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 

all that constitutes a comfortable rural home is perhaps the finest edifice of the 
kind in Brookfield township and excelled by few, if any, in the county. The 
premises have been beautified by quite a number of shade trees, which Mr. 
Sackrider has set out from time to time; these, with the beautiful lawn, inter- 
spersed with flowers and ornamental shrubbery, add to the attractiveness of 
a home in which little is lacking to render it a model of its kind. 

Mr. Sackrider is easily one of the leading farmers and stock raisers of 
his township and stands in the first rank among the representative citizens. 
Enterprising and progressive, he manifests commendable zeal in the develop- 
ment and growth of the country, wields a strong influence for the Democratic 
party, and his counsel and judgment have had no little weight in shaping the 
policies of the same in his own and other counties in the eastern part of the 
state. He has been secretary' of the school board for a number of years: has 
also served as trustee of his township, and his interest in public matters has 
given him considerable prestige as a leader of thought and, in no small degree, 
a moulder of opinion among his fellow citizens. In addition to his farming 
and live stock interests, he is identified with various public utilities, including 
the Home Telephone Company, the Havery Coal Company of Montana, the 
Delmar Bank, and the Peoples Savings Bank of Delmar, being a large stock- 
holder in these financial institutions, also a member of their boards of directors. 
For some years he has been quite active in secret fraternal work, especially in 
Odd Fellowship and the Pythian order, in both of which organizations he has 
been honored with important official trusts. 

]\lr Sackrider was happily married on September 19, 1866, to Jennie 
Rarick, of Steuben county, New York, and a daughter of \\'illiam and Martha 
(Compton) Rarick, who came to this state about the year 1858. Mr. Rarick 
was by occupation a carpenter and builder, but after moving west he turned 
his attention to agriculture. Mrs. Sackrider was reared and educated in her 
nati\-e state, and is a lady of fine mind, strong individuality, and quite popular 
in the social circles of the community. She has borne her husband two chil- 
dren, the older being a son who answers to the name of Clarence. He married 
Helen Leach, of Maquoketa, and is the father of two offspring, Ruth and 
Wilfred. Carrie was the second in order of birth, and is the wife of Doctor 
Wilson, a popular dentist of Delmar, and has two daughters, Vera and Gladys. 
Mrs. Sackrider is interested with her husband in secret and benevolent work, 
being a member of the Rebekah lodge. Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the 
Pythian Sisters, the Eastern Stars, and is also a chevalier, the highest order a 
ladv can attain. 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. IOC/ 

ISAAC NEWTON LOOFBORO. 

Among the well remembered and highly revered citizens of Clinton 
county who have now taken up their abode in "the low, green tent whose cur- 
tain never outward swings," none is deserving of higher encomium than the 
late Isaac Newton Loofboro, for his life was exemplary in every respect and 
his example was that of a high-minded and public-spirited man of affairs 
whose career is worthy of imitation by the youth hesitating at the parting of 
the ways. .^| 

Mr. Loofboro was born in Ohio, on July 12, 1832, the son of Davis and 
Mary (Maxon) Loofboro, the former a native of Virginia, and the latter of 
Warren county, Ohio. They were early settlers of Ohio, and after remaining 
in the Buckeye state for some time moved to Illinois, thence to Clinton county, 
Iowa, in the early fifties and here they spent the remainder of their days, 
the father being deceased. 

Isaac N. Loofboro was educated in the schools of Ohio and Farmington, 
Illinois. After coming to Clinton county, Iowa, he engaged in farming, first 
owning eighty acres of land, which he sold and bought one hundred and sixty 
acres, now owned by the family. He made quite a success as a general 
farmer and was living retired at the time of his death, on September 14, 1907. 
His widow is now living at North Welton. In politics he was a Republican, 
but a Prohibitionist at the time of his death. 

Mr. Loofboro was one of the gallant defenders of the Union during the 
dark days of the Rebellion, having enlisted in Company A, Eighth Iowa 
Volunteer Infantry, in which he served very faithfully for three years, work- 
ing in the hospitals most of the time, but rendering very efficient service 
wherever he was placed. He and his family were members of the Seventh- 
Day Baptists, and he was veiy faithful in his support of the same. 

Mr. Loofboro was married in Clinton county to Anna Davis, who was 
born in Warren county, Ohio, August 27, 1838, the daughter of William and 
Mary (Sterns) Davis. The father came to Clinton county, Iowa, in 1861. 
His wife died in Indiana and his death occurred in Kansas. They were peo- 
ple of sterling worth. To Mr. and Mrs. Loofboro five children were born, 
namely: Horace Roscoe, born in Clinton county, July 30, 1865, he was edu- 
cated in the public schools and at Milton College, Milton, Wisconsin. He 
turned his attention to farming and he and his brother, Lewis Lester, manage 
the old homestead, carrying on general farming and stock raising in a very 
successful manner. Horace R. was married on June 5, 1901, to Hattie 



I008 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

Mudge, a native of Clinton county, and the daughter of Myron C. Mudge, 
mentioned in full in another part of this work. To this union two sons have 
been born, Paul and Elston. Lewis Lester Loofboro was born on May 24, 
1872. and he was educated in the public schools and at Milton College. He, 
too, has devoted his life to agricultural pursuits, as above mentioned. Both 
he and his brother are Prohibitionists and members of the Seventh-Day Bap- 
tist church. The following three children born to Mr. and Mrs. Isaac N. 
Loofboro are deceased: Viola Alecia, Yulee and Luella. The Loofboro fam- 
ilv has always been regarded as among the best people in this section of the 
countA , being honorable in all the relations of life and industrious. 



JAMES EZRA DOLAN. 

A man of distinct and forceful individuality, of undaunted enterprise, 
and in manner genial, courteous and easily approached, is James Ezra Dolan, 
the faithful and capable agent of the Chicago Burlington & Quincy Railroad 
Company at Clinton, Iowa. He deserves a great deal of success for what he 
has accomplished in various phases of railroad life, for it has been done solely 
by his own unaided efforts, often in the face of obstacles. 

Mr. Dolan was born in Lyons, August 2'8, 1865, and he has always lived 
in this part of the great commonwealth of Iowa, growing to maturity in Clin- 
ton county. He is the son of John B. and Phoebe F. (Crosby) Dolan, the 
father a native of Philadelphia and the mother of Plainfield, New Hampshire. 
Each came to Clinton county, Iowa, single, having accompanied their parents 
in the fifties, and located at Lyons, where they were married. The maternal 
grandfather, John Crosby, came to Clinton county in 1850. The father is of 
Irish descent. He was one of the pioneer hardware men of the county and 
for many vears enjoyed an excellent trade here. He was in no sense of the 
word a public man, although interested in the general development of the 
county; he preferred to spend his time on his business and with his family, 
of which there were three sons and one daughter, all ^o^v deceased with the 
exception of James Ezra of this review. The father died in 1875 ; his widow 
survived until 1908, reaching an advanced age. 

One brother of John B. Dolan is living, Thomas Dolan, who is president 
of the United Gas Improvement Company of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, a 
twenty-five-million-dollar corporation. 

James Ezra Dolan was educated in the public schools of Clinton, also 
attended business college and thus became well equipped for his life work. 




JAMES E. DOLAN 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLDD LIBilARY 



ASTOR, LENOX, A^T) 

TILDEN FOfUNDATIONS 

R L 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. IOO9 

He entered the employ of the Chicag-o. Mihvaukee & St. Paul Railroad Com- 
pany under J. S. Stratton, \vho was local agent at that time. He remained in 
this position one year, then went to the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy road 
as night operator at Denrock Junction, Illinois. Later he spent three years 
in the train dispatcher's office, then spent one year in the Clinton office, and 
on October 27, 1902, he was appointed agent, having been here since 1895, a 
position he still holds, having charge of both the freight and passenger work, 
his office being at No. 221 Main street, Lyons. He has proven to be a very- 
faithful employe and is giving the company entire satisfaction in this capacity. 
Mr. Dolan is also interested in the Tri-City Telephone Company. 

Politically, Mr. Dolan is a Republican and in religious matters an 
Episcopalian. He belongs to the Demolay Consistory of Masons. He has 
been secretary of the Athenaeum Club for the past fifteen years. This is the 
societv club of the north end of Clinton. He has never married. 



CARL B. BERST. 



Energy, sound judgment and persistency of effort, properly applied, 
will always win the goal sought in the sphere of human endeavor, no matter 
what the environment may be or what obstacles are met with, for they 
wlio are endowed witli such characteristics make of their adversities step- 
ping-stones to higher things. These reflections are suggested by a study 
of the career of Carl B. Berst, the popular and efficient cashier of the 
Farmers and Merchants Bank of Welton, Clinton county, who has forged 
his way to the front ranks and stands today among the representative young 
men of his locality. 

]\Ir. Berst was born in the state of Ohio, November 26, 1876. and he 
was educated in Germany and in a business college at Springfield, Missouri. 
He applied himself very assiduously to his text-books, and being a keen 
observer, has become highly educated. 

Starting in business early in life, he has been very successful in all 
lines which have claimed his attention. For several years he made a success 
of the creamerv business in Illinois. In 1891 he came to Clinton county. 
Iowa, and located in Welton township where he continued in the creamery 
business for a period of seven years. L'nderstanding the minute workings 
of this line of endeavor he made a great success of the same here and be- 

(64) 



lOIO CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

came well known. He is now the owner of one-half of the local creamery, 
which is one of the best equipped and most popular in the county. 

When the Farmers and Merchants Bank was organized at Welton, 
this county, on December 21, 1908, Mr. Berst became cashier, which respon- 
sible and important position he has continued to hold to the present time, 
discharging the duties of the same in a manner that reflects much credit 
upon his ability and to the entire satisfaction of stockholders and patrons, 
and the success and prestige of this sound and well known institution is 
due in no small measure to his judicious management and wise counsel. 
Politically, Mr. Berst is a Republican and is progressive in his ideas. 

On October 18, 1904, Mr. Berst was married to Mabel Buck, a lady of re- 
finement and the representative of an excellent family, being the daughter 
of Francis and Mary (Jepsen) Buck, of Welton township, this county, 
where they have long been influential. One son has graced the union of 
Mr. and Mrs. Berst, Walter Benjamin, born on August 21, 1905. 

Mr. Berst is one of the well-to-do men of Welton, and is regarded by 
all who know him as a man of sound business principles and modern methods. 
His course has been such that he has won the confidence and good will 
of all with whom he has come into contact, and personally he is a pleasant 
man to know, energetic, genial, unassuming, honest and always ready to 
do his full duty in the work of progressive citizenship, and it is to such 
able and untiring workers as he that this locality has forged ahead until 
it ranks second to none in the great Hawkeye commonwealth. 



HENRY SCHOENING. 

A descendant of an influential old pioneer family, members of which 
have figured conspicuously in the affairs of Clinton county from the days 
of the early settler to the present time, is Henry Schoening, one of the 
thrifty citizens of the vicinity of Bryant, who, as his name would indicate, 
is of German ancestry, from whom he seems to have inherited many traits 
that have helped him to win in the battle of life. 

Mr. Schoening was born in Clinton county, Center township, Iowa, 
on December 8, 1866. He was reared on a farm and educated in the 
district schools. He is the son of Frederick and Louisa (Lammerts) 
Schoening, both born in the province of Holstein, Germany, where they 
were married. Soon after he left his wife there and came to America alone. 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 101 1 

locating in Clinton county, Iowa. His passage was paid, but he had nothing 
left when lie arrived here. He stopped at Lyons and took up employment 
at such labor as he could find to do. Wages were not high at that time, 
but h.e continued two years and saved his earnings until he had sufficient 
money ahead to send for his wife and child to come to him. After their 
arrival here he continued to work and as soon as he was able to buy a team 
he rented land and engaged in farming, continued renting for several years 
and then bought forty acres of timberland. which he lost no time in clearing 
anrl putting in cultivation. He prospered as he added to his lands and 
finally owned eleven hundred and twenty acres, divided into several farms, 
renting some and carrying on general farming on others. He raised, bought 
and fed numb(;rs of cattle and gave all his attention to his lands and farming 
interests. When a young man he was stout and hearty and a hard worker, 
alwavs conservative and careful in his investments and, w'ith careful man- 
agement, hard work and honest dealing, he created a large estate. He 
was a broad-minded and intelligent man and a good financier. He was a 
Democrat in politics and always interested in public affairs, though he 
never aspired to office. He was always charitable to the oppressed and 
needy and a good neighbor and friend. His honesty and integrity were 
above reproach and his word was as good as his bond. Both he and his 
wife were Lutherans in the old country, from which faith they never de- 
parted. The father was born on May 28, 1835, and died on April -18, 1908, 
aged seventy-five years. His wife still survives and resides at Lyons, where 
she has lived for fourteen years ; she is in her seventy-sixth year, but wd\ 
preserved, notwithstanding the hard labor and many hardships she under- 
went in the pioneer days. These good people became the parents of nine 
children: Lena, Airs. William Schrader; Anna, who married Ingwer 
Momsen; William is a farmer: Fred lives on the old homestead: Henry, 
the subject; August is a farmer: Lizzie, now Mrs. Johan S. Snecklodt ; 
Minnie, who married William Wiese : Ferdinand, of Lyons, was a farmer, 
but is now retired. 

Henry Schoening remained under the parental roof until his marriage 
in 1803, ^^^^ th^" ^^^ rented a farm where he labored for two years, after 
which he rented a farm from his father, where he yet resides, the same 
consisting of three hundred and twenty acres. After the death of his father 
and the latter's will was settled, Henry had been given two hundred thirty- 
five acres of the farm, with the improvements thereon. The farm had a 
two-story stone house and one large barn. He has remodeled the farm and 
erected corn-cribs and another large barn for convenience and has made 



IOI2 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

his house and home more attractive by cement walks around the yard and 
house, and the farm is well developed and under a high state of cultivation. 
He cultivates one hundred forty acres, the balance being in grass. In ad- 
dition to his general farming interests, he carries on a large live stock 
business, feeding much stock of a first class variety for the markets. He 
feeds very large numbers of cattle and hogs, which have added much to his 
income. Politically, Mr. Schoening is a Republican, but does not aspire to 
office, more than minor township offices. He was reared by a good Lutheran 
mother, from which faith he has never departed. He is well known and 
commands universal confidence among his many friends and neighbors. 

Mr. Schoening married Emma Dittmann, who was born in Hamp- 
shire township, this county, on July 2, 1872, the daughter of Claus and Anna 
(Frahm) Dittmann, he of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, she also of that 
country. They were married in the old country and came to i\merica in 
1870, locating in Hampshire township. He was a carpenter by trade. He 
had small means when he came to America, but by thrift and economy 
saved enough to buy two hundred acres of land, which he first rented, but 
later his sons conducted it. He never engaged in farming himself, but 
worked at his trade. He is a voter and is well posted in all business of 
the county and nation. He has never aspired to office, although he has 
served on the school board and several other minor offices. He became well 
known and highly respected in each community in which he lived. Both 
he and his wife are Lutherans. He is now seventy-five years old, and his 
wife is sixty-three. They have retired from active labor and reside on 
the old homestead in Hampshire township. Four children were born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Dittmann : Minnie, Mrs. Adolph Thiesen ; Emma, wife of 
the subject; Rudolph, a traveling salesman for farming implements; Her- 
man is a farmer and lives on the home farm. 

Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Henry Schoening, 
Alfred, Erwin and Laurina, all at home. 



JOHN P. AMBROSE. 



Realizing that the present age is one of specialists, when in order to 
succeed one must know how to do things both well and quickly. John P. 
Ambrose, well known in manufacturing circles of Clinton county, sought to 




JOHN P. AMBROSE 






X, A^TD 

TIONS 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 10 1 3 

make himself proficient in whatever he turned his attention to, with the re- 
sult that he has been rewarded with a large measure of success and at the 
same time has won a reputation for industry and straightforward dealings 
with his fellow men. 

Mr. Ambrose was born in Buffalo, New York, December lo, 1864, and 
is the son of Norman and Barbara (Schaller) Ambrose. They were both 
born in Alsace, now a part of the German empire, but at that time belonging 
to France. The father came to America at the age of seventeen years with 
his parents. Barbara Schaller emigrated to our shores when sixteen years old 
with her parents. Both families located in Buffalo and there the parents of 
John P. Ambrose were married. The father began work as a poster at the 
Mansion House on Main street. Later he began "hacking" for himself and 
followed that fourteen or fifteen years. Owing to ill health, he then pur- 
chased a farm in Erie county, near Gardenville, and remained there until he 
retired from active life and moved back to Buffalo where he spent the re- 
mainder of his days, dying in March, 1903. His widow is still living, hav- 
ing reached the advanced age of eighty-seven years, still hale and hearty. 
She is one of the oldest settlers in Buffalo. Seven children were born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Norman Ambrose. Three daughters and two sons are living, while 
two sons are deceased. 

John P. Ambrose was educated in the German Catholic schools of 
Buffalo, New York, and he also attended St. Cornecia's College, from which 
institution he was graduated in the class of 1882. He started in life for him- 
self by entering the crockery l)usiness for George E. Newman & Companv 
at Buffalo as delivery boy. He then learned the brass finishing trade in the 
same place, but on account of ill health he gave up that work and started in 
at the Hamlin Glucose Works at Buffalo, and remained there for a period of 
ten years, having become general starch boss at the end of that time. He 
then went to Peoria, Illinois, and entered the glucose business as foreman in 
the starch department. He remained there two years and then went to Rock- 
ford four years and from there to Waukegan, where he became an employe of 
the United States Sugar Refining Company and remained with that concern 
one year, then went to Peoria, Illinois, with the Peoria Glucose Works, where 
he also spent one year, then returned to Waukegan and worked for the C. N. 
Warner Sugar Refining Company, in the position of night superintendent. 
He remained with this concern, giving his usual high grade service and eminent 
satisfaction, until the concern was sold, then Mr. Ambrose came to Clinton, 
Iowa, September 22, 1906, and was employed by the Clinton Sugar Refining 
Company as assistant manufacturing superintendent, which position he still 



10 14 CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 

holds to the entire satisfaction of all concerned. He is regarded as an ex- 
pert in this line and his long years of practical experience, studious habits 
and careful attention to details renders his services of inestimable value to 
whatever concern he is connected with. 

Mr. Ambrose is a Democrat in politics and he belongs to the German 
Catholic church, as does his wife. He is a member of the Catholic Mutual 
Benefit Association and the Modem Woodmen of America. 

On April 8, 1890, Mr. Ambrose was married to Catherine Woelfel, a 
native of New York and a member of an excellent old family. One child, 
Elmer Edward, was bom to this union. He is now a student and is a base 
ball pitcher of considerable note. Mrs. Ambrose was called to her rest on 
Thanksgiving day, 1892, and on June 6, 1899, Mr. Ambrose married Margaret 
Cecelia Shanahan, a native of Oil City, Pennsylvania, and a lady of many win- 
ning traits. This union has resulted in the birth of three children, Catherine 
Margaret and Norman Joseph; one child died in infancy. 



JOHN MARTIN ATZEN. 

Among the young agriculturists of Brookfield township, Clinton county, 
who have forged to the front in their chosen line of endeavor, the name 
of John Martin Atzen is worthy of special mention in this connection, 
for he has been a hard worker and has managed well, as only a cursory 
glance over his splendid farm will attest. 

Mr. Atzen was born in Berlin township, this county, June 29, 1881. 
He is the son of Henry and Anna (Wies) Atzen. both natives of Germany, 
the former born on November 18, 1854; the latter died when Mr. Atzen 
was young. The father came to Clinton county, Iowa, when fifteen years 
of age and located in Berlin township, and he lived with his uncle, Peter 
Petersen, there for some time. After he was of age he began life for him- 
self by renting farming land in Berlin township, which method he followed 
for several years, and by being economical and working hard he got a 
good start, and in alx)ut 1883 he bought a farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres in Brookfield township, and afterwards bought one lumdred and twenty 
acres more adjoining. The place was nearly all timber when he purchased 
it. but he went to work with a will and in due course of time cleared it 
and placed it under cultivation, and erected good, comfortable buildings. 
He carried on general farming and stock raising, always feeding a large 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. IOI5 

number of cattle each year. Politically he was a Democrat and he served 
his district as school director. He belonged to the Lutheran church and 
was a man of high integrity and honor, his life being led along such lines 
as always inspire the confidence and good will of others. After the death 
of his first wife he w^as married to Mrs. Anna Bleadorn. The following 
children were born to the first union : Harry, Eddie, John Martin and Mrs. 
Anna Schmidt. Two children were born to the second union, Minnie 
and Hilda. The father moved to Maquoketa, Iowa, in 1905 and retired. 

John M. Atzen, of this review, grew to maturity on the home farm, 
which he worked when old enough, and he attended school in Brookfield 
township. He remained under the parental roof until he married ; in fact, 
he has never left the home place, but prior to his marriage he assisted 
his father with the general work about the farm, and since then he has 
been doing for himself, and he has shown that he is a very able agri- 
culturist in all its phases, keeping the farm well improved and well stocked 
and his labors are rewarded year by year by abundant harvests. He is 
enterprising, hard-Working and is highly respected by his neighbors, as 
was his honored father before him. He feeds cattle quite extensively and 
has good success in this line. Mr. Atzen was baptized in the German 
Lutheran church and he has never departed from that faith. 

On March 20, 1905, Mr. Atzen was married to Otilie Kettelsen, who 
was born in Brookfield township, the daughter of Claus and Hermina Ket- 
telsen, which union has resulted in the birth of two children, Martha and 
a baby, Vernon. Like the Atzen family, the Kettelsens are highly respected. 



WILLL\M BRUCE CRAMPTON. 

This is the day of Anglo-Saxon supremacy, and proud should those 
persons be in whose veins flows the pure English blood, for theirs is the 
race and the strain w^hich have given the color and form to the two greatest 
nationalities of the day, the American and the British. There are persons 
in these nationalities of many and various descents, but the English element 
has pressed its dominant stamp on all the national characteristics, and they 
are to all practical purposes English nations throughout. This review re- 
cords the doings of a family who exemplify the strongest English traits. 

William Bruce Crampton was born on June 16, 1881, in Clinton county, 
Iowa, the son of William Crampton. William Crampton was born in 



I0l6 CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 

Lincolnshire, England, on December 7, 185 1, the son of William and Mary 
Crampton. His parents came to this country in 1852, and located in Eden 
township, where a number of English families had colonized, and there 
purchased a farm, following agricultural pursuits until their deaths, at the 
respective ages of seventy-five and eighty-five. They were the parents of 
ten children, six of whom are living, all in this county except Benjamin. 
Those resident in Clinton county are John, George, Eliza (now Mrs. Halless), 
Mrs. John Clement and William. 

William Crampton received his education in the common schools, and 
was married in this county to Eliza Robson, who died on July 11, 1881, and 
was buried in Elvira cemetery. There were born to them four sons, Frankie 
(deceased), Elmer E., Oliver and William Bruce. The three last named 
live near each other on one hundred and sixty acres each of fertile land im- 
proved with good buildings. Their father retired from the farm in 1904, 
first moving to Clinton, and later purchasing property at Low Moor, where 
he now resides. He began married life on the farm where his son, Elmer 
E , now lives, and Ijy good management and industry accumulated property 
until he was, when he retired, the owner of five hundred and sixty acres 
of fine farming land, the most of which lies in Center township. 

William Bruce Crampton, the youngest member of the family, resides 
upon his farm of one hundred and sixty acres, located one mile east of 
Elvira. He is a young man of sterling qualities and one of the successful 
young farmers of his county. In politics he is a Democrat, in religion 
a member of the Lutheran church, while fraternally he is a member of 
the order of Eagles. He is unmarried. None of the younger residents of 
the township are more popular or better liked than is Mr. Crampton, nor 
have a more promising future. 



JACOB HOFFMANN. 

Although probably not a relative of the great German composer bearing 
the name of Hoffmann, the gentleman whose name introduces this biograph- 
ical review has, nevertheless, esthetic qualities, in a way, whether he has 
made a reputation as a musician or not, for he is a lover of nature and 
harmony and symmetry, as is shown by the tasty manner in which he keeps 
his farm in Hampshire township, Clinton county, for it is calculated to impress 
the stranger at a glance, being well kept, clean and in proper order. 



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CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. ID 1 7 

Jacob Hoffmann was born in Germany on February 21, 1862, the son of 
Peter and Martha (Paulsen) Hoffmann, both born, reared and echicated in the 
fatherland, nnd who. in the year 1873, emio-rated to America and located in 
Clinton county, Iowa. The father was a shoemaker by trade, which he fol- 
lowed successfully until old age. He lived in Washington township, this 
county, where his death occurred on February 21, 1901. His widow is still 
living, now at an advanced age. They were the parents of seven children, all 
of whom are living. 

Jacob Hoffmann received his education in the schools of Germany, where 
he grew to maturity. He also attended school a short time after coming to 
this country. He was reared on a farm and he took up farming for a life 
occupation, working out as a farm hand until he was thirty-four years old, 
or in 1896, when, having saved his money, he purchased a farm of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres in Hampshire township, Clinton county. He has brought 
this place up to a high state of cultivation and improvement, and built a fine 
house, a good barn and made all necessary improvements on the same. He 
is a general farmer and raises some good stock. In politics he is an inde- 
pendent voter, preferring to support the men who. in his judgment, are best 
qualified to fill the offices sought. He and his wife belong to the Lutheran 
church at Elvira. 

On March 3. 1897, Mr. Ploffmann was united in marriage with Mrs. i\Ia- 
tilda Jacobsen, a native of Clinton, Iowa, where she was reared and educated. 
This union has resulted in the birth of three children, Martin, Ernest and 
Louisa. 



CHARLES JARGO. 



This sketch deals with the life of a man who is prominently identi- 
fied with the farming and stock raising interests of Elk River township 
and the vice-president of the Teeds Grove Savings Bank. Charles Jargo 
was born in Elk River township, Clinton county, Iowa, on March 218, 1864, 
was reared to farming and stock raising, and recei\'ed his education in the 
district schools, and at Riverside Institute, where he spent two terms. He 
is the son of William F. and Wilhelmina (Lange) Jargo, both natives of 
Mecklinburg. Germany, where they were married. William F. Jargo was 
reared as a shepherd boy, caring for the sheep, later engaged in regular farm 
work, and when married came to America, landing in New York in 1857. 
From there he came to Chicago, where both he and his wife found employ- 



IOl8 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

ment on a farm, for, being without means, they were not afraid to work. 
Here they remained but a short time and then came to CHnton, where he 
found work cutting cord wood for the railroad at a low price per cord. 
Later he worked at such labor as he could find, mostly for the farmers, 
often taking pay in some of their produce, on which he could live, thus con- 
tinuing until he was able to buy a yoke of oxen, when he rented a farm. 
He rented until 1867, when he bought eighty acres of land at twenty-five 
dollars per acre, with a small amount of improvements, including a box 
house. He resided on this farm until his death, to which he added until it 
included two hundred and forty acres, and had bought other lands, and 
aided his three sons in the purchase of farms. Mr. Jargo followed general 
farming and stock raising, also buying and feeding stock for market, mostly 
shipping his own stock, and giving his attention to his farm and its prod- 
ucts to the exclusion of other matters. In the true sense of a self-made man, 
he accumulated a good estate. His best and most often consulted adviser 
was his wife, a faithful helpmate. In politics he was a Republican, but never 
aspired to office beyond serving in some of the township offices, among them 
that of school director, which he filled for several years. He and his wife 
were brought up in the Lutheran faith, from which they never departed, 
and were well known and highly respected residents of their community, of 
honor and integrity above reproach. Mr. Jargo died on August 24, 1903, 
in his ninety-fourth year, his wife on September 24, 1904. They were the 
parents of three sons: William, who is a practical, neat and successful farmer 
in Jackson county, Iowa; Charles, and Ernest, also a prominent farmer of 
Jackson county, living near Miles, and near his brother William. 

Charles Jargo was reared on the old homestead, which he now owns 
and where he resides and carries forward the work inaugurated by his 
father. He has made a record equal to his father's, and is engaged in 
general farming and the raising of thoroughbred and registered Short- 
horn cattle, Percheron and Norman horses, and Poland China hogs. He 
has added to the homestead, and now owns four hundred and sixteen acres 
of farming and grass land, well adapted to stock raising, with running 
water and wells in each field. The house, which is built on an elevated 
site, he has remodeled and enlarged and has erected other needed buildings, 
making his one of the best improved farms in the township. He is a stock- 
holder in the Teeds Grove Savings Bank and its vice-president. This is 
one of the solid institutions of Clinton county. He also owns an interest 
in two fine stallions of proved merit, one a Percheron and the other a Belgian, 
and is a member of a threshing machine company, and the committeeman 




MRS. DORA STRUVE 




WILLIAM STROVE 






I 






; ni. 



L 



lUi 



t 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. IOI9 

that bought the machine. For eight years he has been a member of the 
school board, and has given liis children a good education, three of them 
having graduated from the high school, and three from the public schools, 
ready for advancement. Mr. Jargo is a strong and active Republican, but 
has cared to hold no offices save that of township clerk. Baptized in the 
Lutheran faith, he has never departed from it. Fraternally, he is a member 
of the Odd Fellows and has filled all the chairs. 

In 1888 Charles Jargo was married to Julia Kunau, the daughter of 
John and x\nna C. (Feldtmann) Kunau, natives of Germany, where they 
were married and where their daughter Julia was born. John Kunau came 
to America without his family in 1868, landing in New York, then, bringing 
the family, made a short stop in Ohio, and came on to Iowa, where he 
started in on a small scale as a farm renter. He was successful, and later 
bought a good farm of three hundred acres, forty of which were in timber. 
After advancing age had come to him, he sold the farm to his son and 
retired from active lal3or. In politics he is independent. He and his family 
are members of the Lutheran church. Mr. Kunau is well known, and highly 
respected where known. His family consisted of Julia, Mrs. Jargo; John, 
a farmer; Theresa, Mrs. M. H. Peters; Ernest, a farmer; Bertha, Mrs. 
Henry Peters; Elfreda, Mrs. Ferdinand Peters: xA.lfred, farmer on the 
homestead; and S. H., assistant cashier of the Teeds Grove Savings Bank. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Jargo have been born six children ; the eldest are twins, 
William H. and John K., born October 8, 1890: Alta P., born on Sep- 
tember 3, 1892; Malinda J., born on March 17, 1895; and Marvin B. and 
Ervin A., twins, born on December 24, 1896. 

The Drover's Journal of Chicago offered three prizes for subscrip- 
tions to their paper, the second of which was a ticket to Washington, D. C, 
which was won by Marvin B., one of Mr. Jargo's youngest sons. So his 
father paid the fare for his twin brother, and the two boys made the trip, 
and stood in front of the Capitol in the group and had their pictures taken 
with the national winners, the whole being quite an achievement for thir- 
teen-year-old boys. 



WILLIAM STRUVE. 



The name which heads this sketch is one of the best known names in 
Elk River township and in Clinton county, as that of the miller of Hauntown, 
while his mill is one of the historic landmarks of the county. William Struve 



I020 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

was born in Jackson county, Iowa, on August i8, 1858, the son of Ernest H. 
and Safrina (Schnoor) Struve, both natives of Germany. Ernest H. Struve 
was born in 1826, and in 1848 came to America, first locating in Texas, and 
later in Scott county, Iowa. He bought raw land and in 1854 bought in Jack- 
son county. In 1868 he sold this and engaged in milling at Teeds Grove, 
having learned the millwright's trade in his native land. He remained but 
one year at Teeds Grove, and then bought an interest in the mill near Haun- 
town. in Elk River township, which he conducted until 1887, when he sold 
the mill to his son William and moved to Almont, where he bought an im- 
proved farm, and where he was postmaster for a number of years, living 
mostly a retired life. He was a very competent miller, did both merchant 
and custom work, and was very successful and much respected, being known 
as the "honest miller." In politics he was a Republican and took much inter- 
est in public affairs, being proud of his adopted country. Both he and his 
wife were members of the Lutheran church. He died on April 24, 1900; his 
wife preceded him in December, 1898. She was the daughter of Henry 
Schnoor, a native of Germany, who came to America in 1854, with his family, 
and located in Jackson county, where he followed the millwright's trade for a 
time, which he had learned in the old country, and also did carpenter work. 
He was a Lutheran. Air. Struve was among the oldest of his eight children. 

To Ernest Struve and his wife six sons and two daughters were born, 
namely: The eldest died in infancy; Paul H. is a farmer and assistant in the 
mill; William; John, the miller of Lyons; Ferdinand, formerly a fanner and 
miller, now lives retired at Miles, Iowa; Amelia married John Frahm; Ed- 
ward is a farmer; Martha M. married J. L. Myers. 

William Struve grew up at farming and milling, attended the district 
schools, and has a good practical education. He assisted his father in the mill 
for some time, then rented it from him, and finally bought it. This mill was 
an old-style buhr mill, which he has since remodeled and now uses up-to-date 
machinery, having six pairs. of rolls for wheat, while he uses the old stone 
mill for buckwheat and rye, and does merchant and custom work. He ex- 
changes with the farmers flour for wheat, grinds feed, and also runs a saw- 
mill in connection. The Elk River mill is one of the oldest in Iowa, the 
present mill, which succeeded others on the same site, having been built in 
18^4. originally using water power from the Elk river, but Mr. Struve has 
attached a steam engine for use when the water is low. In early days the 
settlers came for one hundred miles about to Elk River mill, and Hauntown 
was one of the prosperous early settlements, while the mill is an old land- 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. I02I 

mark known to all of the early settlers. It has always been operated by cap- 
able millers and the people have been treated honestly. Mr. Struve uses home 
grown wheat except when the supply is short, then ships in from elsewhere. 
For many years he gave his entire attention to the mill, but has later branched 
out. The mill property contains over three hundred acres of farming, pas- 
ture and timber land, and Mr. Struve raises cattle, hogs and horses, and feeds 
cattle and hogs for market, mostly shipping his own stock. In 1898 he as- 
sisted in organizing the Sabula Telephone Company, which was incorporated 
in that year, and is president of the company, which has over three hundred 
phones in operation. In politics he is a Republican, and active, being a lead- 
ing member of the township committee and having filled school offices and 
served as township tax collector with credit to himself and satisfaction to the 
people and party. 

Mr. Struve has been twice married, the first time, in 1888, to Ella Myers, 
a native of Elk River township, the daughter of Adam and Eizzie (Kline) 
Myers, her father a native of Germany and her mother of Ohio. Adam 
Myers was a farmer, Ijut has now retired to Lyons, where his wife died in 
April, 1910. Four children were born to Mr. Struve by his first wife: Cora 
M., Ethel I., Joseph W. and Roy A., all at home. Their mother died in 
March, 1896. Mr. Struve was again married in November, 1897, ^o Dora 
Myers, a sister of his former wife. To this union there have been four 
children born: Virtus H., Lyle A., Harvey E. and Leslie M. 



JOHN F. FOX. 



The name of John F. Fox is well remembeed in railroad circles in east- 
ern Iowa, and, in fact, by a wide circle of loyal friends and acquaintances, 
for he was for many years considered one of the best men in his line of work 
in this country and his genial personality, coupled with his straightforward 
business policy and his hospitable manner, made him admired and respected 
by all who came into contact with him. He will not soon be forgotten here, 
his death, occurring as it did while he was in the full zenith of his powers, 
being sincerely regretted by the community long honored by his residence. 

Mr. Fox was born in Clinton county, Iowa, March 4, 1854, of an excellent 
old pioneer family. He received a good education in the public schools of his 
native vicinity. He was the son of John and Mary Fox, both natives of 
Missouri and now both deceased. The son, John F. Fox, began life as a 



I022 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

farmer, which he continued until he was twenty-one years of age in Hampshire 
township, this county, but not caring to follow the life of the husbandman, 
he came to Lyons and began working in a saw mill, later securing employment 
on the Northwestern railroad. After filling a minor position, his abilities 
were readily recognized by the officials and he was appointed foreman of the 
bridge and piling work, his first boss being W. D. Waldron. Having per- 
formed his work in a manner that gave the utmost satisfaction in every detail, 
he was made superintendent of the western division under W. C. Halsey, the 
duties of which important and responsible trust he continued to perform in. a 
manner that reflected the utmost credit upon himself and to the entire satis- 
faction of the company, until his death in a wreck, November 4, 1904, in 
Washington county. Iowa. His success was due from the fact that he was a 
man quick of perception, being able to readily grasp a situation, and also be- 
cause he believed in doing well what was worth doing at all. He was liked 
by his men and knew well how to manage all types of crews so as to obtain 
the best results. 

Mr. Fox was married on July 18, 1878, to Sarah Laughlin, a lady of re- 
finement and pleasing address, a native of the state of Wisconsin and the 
daughter of Michael and Bridget Laughlin, a highly respected and influential 
family who came to America from Ireland. Mrs. Laughlin was educated in 
Lady Dugel Seminary at Lyons, Iowa. Mr. Fox was a man of exemplary 
character in everv respect and a worthy and conscientious member of the 
Catholic church, of which Mrs. Fox is also a faithful member. 



JOHN B. COOK. 

The late John B. Cook was one of the leading agriculturists of Hamp- 
shire township, Clinton county. Being a man of enterprise, at the close of 
his career he had something to show for his labor, and he left behind him 
the untarnished escutcheon of an old and highly honored name and a record 
of which any community might well be proud. It is said of him that he 
never contracted a debt unless he felt confident that he could pay it promptly, 
and in thus meeting all obligations he won the undivided confidence of all who 
knew him. He always gave his aid and influence to enterprises for the public 
good, taking a great interest in his adopted county and state and in his com- 
munity he did many things that resulted in a general uplift. 

Mr. Cook, like many of the progressive citizens of Clinton county, was 
a native of Ohio, having been born in Clermont county in 1827. There he 



54*(* .V*!&jC. 



mf^^m wSm- 




/ 



JOHN B. COOK 



r nm mw york 

num LIBRARY 



tirjXiN FOruNDATIONS 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. IO23 

grew to maturity and received a good education in the schools of his vicinity, 
which was supplemented later in life 1)y wide and systematic home reading 
and by actual contact with the world at large. When a youth he assisted 
with the general work about the place, being by nature industrious and a 
good manager, so that he got a start early in life. After farming a short 
time in Ohio, he moved to near Ouincy, Illinois, and in 1848 came to Iowa, 
and, liking the country, believing that it held rare possibilities for the future, 
he decided to cast his lot here, beginning life in true pioneer fashion. He 
became prominent in his community and in due course of time owned and 
developed three valuable farms. This fact shows his indomitable courage 
and industry as nothing else could, for it is not a small matter to develop 
even one farm from the wild. His home place was a model, well improved 
in every respect and he had a substantial, amply and neatly furnished dwell- 
ing and good out-buildings. He handled a great deal of live stock in con- 
nection with general farming and was vtry successful in whatever he turned 
his attention to. It will be a long time before Hampshire township sees a 
better all-around agriculturist and a worthier citizen. The death of Mr. 
Cook occurred in January, 1907. 

Mr. Cook married, in Ohio, Rebecca ]\Iiller, the daughter of an excellent 
old family of the Buckeye state. 

By his kindness and courtesy Mr. Cook won an abiding place in the es- 
teem of his fellow citizens, and by his intelligence, energy and enterprising 
spirit made his influence felt among his friends and associates, bv reason of 
his well ordered life. 



FRANK GAGE. 

The art of carpentry has found an able exponent in Clinton county in the 
person of Frank Gage, whose residence is in the city of Lyons. He has a 
wide reputation as an adroit workman, always painstaking, accurate and ex- 
ercising splendid taste and good judgment, consequently his services are 
always in great demand. Not only as a carpenter and builder, but also as a 
citizen, ]\Ir. Gage is popular. He was born in Jackson county. Iowa, August 
10, i860, and is the son of Marshall Springer Bid well Gage, whose death 
occurred in 1893. ^'s wife was known in her maidenhood as Agnes Graham, 
who was born in Canada. 

The subject's paternal grandfather. James P. Gage, was a trader on the 
great lakes and he became wealthy for those early days. He came to Lyons, 
Iowa, in the late fifties. Here he built and conducted a retail grocery store. 



I024 . CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 

Later he started the Citizens National Bank in Clinton, which is still the most 
prosperous banking house in the city. His son, Marshall S. B.. father of 
Frank Gage, when about eighteen or nineteen years of age, moved to Iowa 
there and continued to reside there a short time. In i'86i he moved to Lyons 
and with his father went into the retail grocery business. After a few years 
he entered the First National Bank at Lyons and learned the banking business, 
becoming cashier of that institution, and in 1872 he went into his father's bank 
in Clinton, the Citizens National Bank. He was an ardent Democrat and 
served his party very faithfully as city alderman in 1890. He was an ex- 
cellent financier and a man in whom the utmost confidence was reposed by 
all who knew him. 

Frank Gage, of this review, is the only son in a family of six children; 
his sisters were Mary, Jenell and Breezy, all deceased ; and Mrs. Carrie Lund 
and Mrs. Myra Eron. 

The subject was educated in the Lyons high school and after his gradua- 
tion there he took a course in the Clinton Business College. He then learned 
the carpenter's trade and has followed the same ever since, with very gratify- 
ing results. He owns a very attractive and comfortable home at No. 709 
Commercial street, Lyons. 

Mr. Gage is a loyal Democrat and takes a great interest in the affairs of 
his party. He was elected alderman at large in this city two successive terms, 
beginning in 1907. and he is still serving and is making a splendid record in 
this capacity. His continued service in this connection is a criterion of his 
high standing in the city. 

Mr. Gage was married on Februaiy 22, 1883. to Emily Wright, who was 
born at Lyons, the daughter of H. J. and Ann (Beckington) Wright, both 
natives of England. This union has resulted in the birth of two sons, Harry 
Bidwell and Robin H. The former has a son named Bidwell Keyes Gage, thus 
preserving the name ''Bidwell"' which has been in the family many genera- 
tions ; the child's great-grandfather also bore the name of Bidwell. 



HERMAN F. WURMKE. 

It is somewhat surprising in passing through the farming sections of 
Clinton and other counties in the great valley of the "Father of Waters" to 
note the large number of young men who are operating the farms. This is 




MR. AND MRS. DIEDRICH WURMKE 



THE NEW WRK 

PUBLrc IIBRART 



ASTOR, LENOX, A.5t> 

TIJLDEN FOUNDATIONS 

^ L 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. IO25 

as it should be, for they are full of energy, ambition and are desirous of get- 
ting a start, and so much more can be accomplished in the first half of one's 
life; then, too, it is good to see the old patriarchs, fathers of these young men. 
who labored long and hard in the clearing and developing of the farms here 
now enjoying a respite and living in honorable retirement in their pleasant 
homes. They need the rest and the young blood needs the chance to do some- 
thing. 

One of the young men of Clinton county who is making good as a 
farmer is Herman F. Wurmke, who is living on the place on which he was 
born on May 5, 1883. He is the son of Diedrich and Mary Anna Wurmke, 
both natives of Germany, from which country they came to America in 1858 
and 1 86 1, respectively, being then single, having grown to maturity in the 
Fatherland, and they were married after reaching the United States. 

Diedrich Wurmke embarked in a sailing vessel at Hamburg. Germany, 
and was nine weeks and two days on the water. He landed at New Orleans, 
where he remained for three years, when, accompanied b^■ two brothers, he 
went to Davenport. Iowa, by wagon, being three weeks on the road. There 
he was employed at day lalwr. He was saving of his money and when he 
had accumulated eighteen hundred dollars he bought his first land in Clinton 
county, that being in 1864, and the purchase comprised eighty acres. He 
was progressive and fifteen years later added one hundred and thirty acres, 
making a total of two hundred and ten acres, in Hampshire township. He 
cleared much of this land and placed it under excellent improvements, and 
had one of the best farms of the community. He was not a public man and 
lived a quiet and retired life. 

Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Diedrich Wurmke. named as 
follows: Mrs. Carolina Dierks. of Lincoln. Nebraska; John, who lives in 
Bloomfield. Nebraska; Mrs. Anna David, of Idaho; Paub'na Jensen, who 
lives in the state of W^ashinoton ; Emma Amanda lives at home; Bertha Louisa 
niso lives nt home; Herman F , of this review. The father of these children 
\x-as railed to his reward on October 7. 1903 ; the mother is still living:. 

Herman F. Wurmke was educated in the common schools of his home 
district prew un on the farm and has made farming his life work, having 
assisted his fatlter until his death. He is now the owner of one of the dioice 
farms of the township, consisting of two hundred and ten acres. He car- 
ries on general farming and stock raising in a manner that stamps him as 
being abreast of the times in every respect. He keeps his place well improved 
and his buildings are substantial and in good repair, in fact, his place presents 
a pleasing appearance, for he is a good manager and a hard worker, and 

(65) 



1026 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

is deserving of a very high rank in the list of Clinton county's young agri- 
culturists. 

Politically, Mr. Wurmke is independent, and has never aspired to pub- 
lic offices. He belongs to the German Lutheran church and is a young man 
of steady habits. He has remained unmarried. 



EDWARD L. CAIN. 



Prominently identified with the farming and business interests of Deep 
Creek township. Clinton county, is Edward L. Cain, a man who has worked 
long and hard for what he has and is therefore deserving of the success that 
is today his. 

Mr. Cain was born in Union City. Michigan, April 15, 1865, was reared 
on a farm and educated in the rural schools and one year at St. Joseph's 
College, Dubuque, Iowa, also two years at St. Ambrose College. Daven- 
port. He is the son of Edward and Celia (McKirnan) Cain, both of Ire- 
land. They were married in Xew York state and remained there a short 
time, then moved to Michigan, where the father improved farms and set 
out orchards. In 1867 they moved to Jackson county, Iowa, where he 
bought prairie land and improved another farm ; latter he sold out in 
Jackson county and came to Clinton county and bought land where tlie sub- 
ject yet lives. It had been under cultivation, but there were no buildings. 
The subject moved and settled near and his father made his home with him 
and the son erected all the buildings. He has a commodious, two-story 
frame house, three large barns and outhouses for all contingencies, and his 
three hundred and sixty acres is all under fence and in pasture and culti- 
vation. The father died here on September 2, 1904. In his active days 
he did general farming and raised stock and was successful. He was an 
early settler liere. was a Democrat in politics and filled some township of- 
fices in Jackson county, was township trustee many years and held other 
minor township offices, filling each position with which he was entrusted 
with credit to himself and to the satisfaction of the people. He was well 
known in Jackson county and highly respected, his integrity and honor be- 
ing above reproach. His wife died in January, 1882. Both were Catholics. 
Five children were born to them, namely: Lizzie. Mrs. O'Neil, of Montana; 
Thomas died in 1905, single; John is a business man of Preston, Iowa; 
Ellen, ]\Irs. John Ryan; Edward L., of this review. 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 102/ 

Edward L. Cain remained under the parental roof until he married, when 
he took charge of this farm and his father made his home with him during 
his declining years. The son has made all the substantial improvements on 
the farm and has a well improved place in a good state of cultivation. He 
has a good young orchard and a fine farm home. He is a general farmer 
and raises stock, which he feeds and ships to the market, having been very 
successful. He also holds stock in the Goose Lake Bank. He is anions: 
the leading Democrats of his township, and in Jackson county he was elec- 
ted tax collector, and after settling in this tow^nship in 1904, he was elec- 
ted township clerk, which position he has filled creditably to himself and 
satisfactorily to the people. He was brought up in the Catholic church, 
from which faith he has never departed. 

Mr. Cain married, in April, 1891, Margaret Flynn, who was born in 
this township November 13, 1865, and who has proved a worthy wife and 
good helpmate. She is the daughter of ]\Iathew and ]\Iargaret (Phelan) Flynn, 
both natives of Erin's green isle, but they were married in Clinton county. 
He came to America when nineteen years old, and spent a few years in the 
east. About 1835 or 1836 he came west to Dubuque, Iowa, and followed 
such labor as he could find to do and, after a few years at Dubucjue, came 
to Clinton county about 1837, as a pioneer and entered land in Deep Creek 
•township and improved it. Later he married, and made a government 
settlement, being a pioneer in the settlement. He helped lay the foundation 
for moral and physical development and for good government. He was a 
strong Democrat and well posted on all matters of public interest, using 
his influence for the party. He was a hard working man and by good 
management he created a good estate, a large, valuable farm and was a 
general farmer and raised and fed stock for market. He gave his farm and 
products all his attention. He was a broad minded, intelligent farmer and a 
good financier. He was social and enjoyed friends, was charitable to the 
afflicted and needy, a good neighbor and friend. When he first came he 
did his milling at Hauntown, on the Elk river. He was among the first 
to settle here, and he underwent many deprivations and hardships such as 
all early settlers had to undergo. He was a strong Democrat, but had held 
no office. He was a constant and worthy member of the Catholic church. 
He died April 3, 1890, and is buried by the church in the Catholic ceme- 
tery. His wife, who died in April, 1900, was also a Catholic. 

Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Flynn, the wife of Mr. Cain 
being the fifth in order of birth. To Mr. and Mrs. Cain ha\e been born 
five children, namely : Matthew, Anna, Joseph, Ella and Cecelia, all living 



I028 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

at home. Air. and Mrs. Cain are consistent and worthy members of the 
CathoHc church, and are educating and bringing up their children in that 
faith. 



COL. JOHN LUBBERS. 

There would be a regrettable omission in any history of Clinton county 
purporting to be fully complete and comprehensiye, should the name of the 
well remembered and highly honored Col. John Lubbers be omitted from its 
annals, for he was one of the notable men of his day and gener'ttion here and 
one of the early settlers of Lyons. All who were acquainted with him will 
readily acquiesce in the statement that he was one of the most prominent Ger- 
man-American citizens of this part of the state, haying been one of the braye 
"boys in blue" who unhesitatingly offered his seryices and his life, if need be, 
in defense ot the stars and stripes which he loyed. and who. through rare tact, 
brayery and courage, rose to the rank of colonel and won the commendation 
and admiration of his men and superior officers. 

Colonel Lubbers was born in Bremen, Gemiany, December 22, 1825, and 
from early boyhood he had a penchant for the free adventurous life of the 
sailor. When only fifteen years of age he went to sea, where, by faithfulness 
to. duty, he gradually rose in nautical affairs, and in the war of i'848 he was 
second lieutenant in the German navy. He had a thrilling experience, hav- 
ing been captured by the Danes and held a prisoner for three months, when 
he effected his escape, after which he came to America and settled first in 
Sandusky. Ohio, in 1853. Buying a farm near that city, he devoted his at- 
tention to the same a short time. The call of the wanderlust soon took him 
from the cjuiet and monotony of rural life, and he settled in Clinton county, 
Towa. in 18:7 anrl built a hotel at Lyons, known as the Dresden hotel, which 
became very popular in those ante-bellum days, under his efficient manage- 
ment. The great Civil war coming on in 1861, he enlisted as captain of Com- 
pany E, Twenty-sixth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, in ^yhich he serv^ed with dis- 
tirr^ion rntil the close of the war. rising by merit and faithful service to the 
rank of lieutenant-colonel. He participated in many tnnng campaigns and 
some of the leading battles of the war, in all of which he conducted himself 
with the courage, discipline and sagacity of an able officer and true patriot of 
his adopted country. 

After his career in the army. Colonel Lubbers returned to Lyons and 
continued to conduct his hotel for awhile, then traded it for a farm and en- 




C01_ONEL JOHN LUBBERS 



i Tiir mv: vofiT, 

; PUBLIC uaaAtrv 



^.STOR, IFNOT, AVI) 

iiLDEN FaUNflAXrOMS 

& I 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. IO29 

gaged in agricultural pursuits until his death, which occurred in the year 1885. 
He developed one of the model farms of this section of the county, kept it 
well improved and under a high state of cultivation. He had a commodious 
and attractive dwelling and substantial outbuildings, and he always kept a 
gfoo:! grade of live stock of various kinds, being a good judge of stock. He 
liked good horses and kept some fine ones. He 'was long regarded as one of 
the leading farmers and substantial citizens of his community, and while 
laboring for his own advancement he never lost sight of his obligations to 
his neighbors and the public in general, always standing ready to do his full 
duty as a citizen, supporting at all times such measures as made for the gen- 
crnl good. Politicallv he was a Democrat and he served very acceptably as 
assessor of his township and other local offices. His life of sixty-six years 
was a very active and strenuous one, filled with varied and interesting experi- 
ences and characterized at all times by duty well performed. 

In early manhood Colonel Lubbers married Johanna Fuhrmann, a native 
of Schleswig, Germany, a lady of many praiseworthy characteristics and the 
daughter of a sterling old family. This union resulted in the birth of ten 
children, all of whom died in infancy but two, Hattie and Paul. 

Colonel Lubbers was a man whom to know was to admire and respect, for 
his word was as good if not better than the bond of most men, and he was a 
leader among the Germans of this part of the state and he did much for the 
general good of the locality where he so long resided. 



ANDREW L. HARRINGTON. 

Iowa is a farming state and the bulk of her wealth consists of farming 
property. The majority of her citizens reside on farms and there have been 
developed those qualities of character which have made them noted for their 
uprightness and moral strength. Lhideniably. the farm is the best developer 
of honest, sturdy manhood. Contact with nature and the freedom from the 
temptations for crooked dealings which city life offers ha^•e much to do with 
tin's. One may deal falsely with his fellow men. l)ut he can not play the trick- 
ster with nature The gentleman whose history we are now recording is a 
splenrhrl examnle of the best product of the Iowa farm. 

Andrew L. Harrington was born in Genesee county. New York, on Au- 
p-ust 22. 1841. a son of Stukelv S. Harrington, who w^s l;orn in Otsego county, 
New 'S'ork. December 20. 1806. and Elizabeth fExans) Harrington, born in 



1030 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

Pownald, Vermont, January 9, 1810. They came to Clinton county in 1865 
and in July, 1866, located on the farm which their son Andrew still owns. 
Here Stukely died, July 26, 1897, his wife having long preceded him, dying 
at De Witt August 16, 1879. They were the parents of two children, Chaun- 
cey Spencer (see his sketch) and Andrew L. Stukely Harrington was a Demo- 
ocrat in early life, but after the organization of the Republican party trans- 
ferred his allegiance to it. In New York he was assessor of Alabama town- 
ship, Genesee county. He was a man of much influence in his community and 
highly esteemed. 

Andrew L. Harrington attended the common schools and worked on the 
farm and in a saw mill when a boy. He came to this county in 1865 with his 
parents, and now owns the old homestead of one hundred and sixty acres. He 
is a general farmer and stock feeder and has one of the best cared for and most 
productive farms in the township. In politics he is a Republican, but has 
never aspired to office. He and his family are members of the Baptist church. 

Mr. Harrington was married in Genesee county, New York, to Jemima 
Ackerson, and had by her one son, James, born May 31, 1868, a farmer and 
mechanic. She died on June 6, 1880. His second wife was Caroline Com- 
stock, whom he married on Januaiy i, 1881, and who died June 24, 1884, 
leaving no children. On October 30, 1884, he was married to Harriet M. 
Eldred, of Otsego, New York, whose death occurred on December 21. 19 10. 
She was a good woman, being a faithful member of the Baptist church. James 
S. Harrington was married to Hattie Nailer on July i, 1891, and has four 
children, Maiw Elizabeth, born September 2^,, 1892; Frank Lee, born No- 
vember II, 1893; Chauncey Spencer, born March 15, 1895; and George An- 
drew, born June 12, 190 1. All are living and are a fine family of young folks. 
He is a Republican, and he and his family are Baptists. He owns one hun- 
dred fifty-four acres, and is a general farmer and stock raiser and one of the 
most skillful in the community. 

Both Andrew Harrington and his son James are men of exceptional 
standing in the township. They are esteemed by those who know them and 
have many friends. They are among the most progressive farmers of the 
township. 



JAMES DWIGHT LAMB. 

No man has ever lived in Clinton county who left a more indelible imprint 
of his sterling characteristics upon the hearts of friends and acquaintances 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. IO3I 

than the late James Dwight Lamb, who was summoned to close his earthly 
accounts and take up his abode "in the windowless palaces of rest" while in 
the full flush and zenith of his young manhood. His career was one of which 
any family should be proud, for it showed what right principles, properly 
directed, could accomplish and how excellent a thing it is to live up to high 
ideals. 

Mr. Lamb was born in Clinton, Iowa, June 25, 187 1, and was the second 
son of the late Artemus Lamb, deceased, who was the founder of the firm of 
C. Lamb & Sons, one of the largest lumber milling firms in the Mississippi 
valley and which made the name of Clinton widely known. This family has 
been prominent in all the relations of life in this locality since the pioneer days. 

Dwight Lamb, as he was familiarly known, enjoyed the advantages of a 
liberal education, having attended school at Exeter, New Hampshire, and 
later at Orchard Lake, Michigan. His tastes were for an active business 
career and while still a young man his father gave him a position in the office 
of mill D, the Chancy mill of the firm of C. Lamb & Sons. Mr. Lamb learned 
the business thoroughly and in a few years became manager of this branch of 
the business, retaining this active control until the close of the mill. 

Meanwhile he had become interested in machinery. Mechanism was 
not only his hobby, but became his absorbing passion. Beginning with an 
interest in the Clinton Separator Works, he developed the business until it 
grew into the Lamb Boat & Engine Company, of which he was president and 
promoter. The business of this firm has traveled far and wide ; branch offices 
have been established in Chicago, St. Louis, Milwaukee and New York City 
and through them the Lamb engines and his latest model, the torpedo stern 
launch and cruisers, have been sold in many states of the Union. 

With the advent of automobiles he took up this branch of mechanism, 
establishing the first and only garage, for some time, conducted in the city and 
in this portion of the state. The winter before his death saw the incorporation 
of the Lamb Automobile Company, with J. D. Lamb as president, and the 
building of a handsome permanent building for a garage and repair shop. 

There were other interests in Clinton with which he was more or less 
actively identified. These interests included a directorship in the Peoples 
Trust and Savings Bank, a directorship in the City National Bank, also in the 
Iowa & Illinois Railroad Company, of which he was treasurer, and an interest 
in the Clinton theater. He had a genius for organization and promoting 
concerns and he was veiy successful in whatever he turned his attention to, 
being a man of keen observation, a clear, analytical mind and able, with re- 
markable accuracy, to forecast the outcome of a present transaction. 



1032 CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA, 

In social and lodge circles, Mr. Lamb was a prominent figure, being a 
member of the W'apsipinicon Club, and he was a thirty-second-degree Mason, 
belonging to the blue lodge, the Royal Arch chapter, the Knights Templar, 
the DeMolay Consistory and also a member of the Ancient Arabic Order of 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine; he was, in addition, a charter member of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

On October 5, 1892, James D. Lamb was married to Mollie Ankeny, 
daughter of Mrs. \"aleria M. Ankeny and a descendant of two of the first 
families of the state. To them were born three children. Celeste, Valeria and 
Artemus, the latter being the only male minor of the name of Lamb. 

The home life of this practical millionaire was one of great happiness. 
He had an ideal home, a beautiful and magnificent residence which he built 
at \\'oodlands, attractive, well kept, elegantly furnished and often the scene 
of hospitality and a favorite mecca for a large circle of admiring friends and 
acquaintances. 

The death of this distinguished citizen was a tragic one. he having been 
drowned on May 12. 1905. having accidentally fallen off the cruiser "Mar- 
garet," a boat which had just been turned out by the Lamb Boat & Engine 
Works, the accident occurring on her trial trip on the Mississippi river near 
Bellevue. His death came as a great shock to the people of Clinton, for he 
was a man whose personality made itself felt. He was a rich man. but not 
one of the ideal rich, his wealth l.eing turned to good account. He was an 
extensive manufacturer, and interested citizen in everything that redounded to 
the welfare of Clinton, and he was never too busy to listen to or assist in pro- 
moting some public measure benefit. His place in the industrial world of 
Clinton and eastern Iowa will be a very hard one to fill. He can be seen by 
mortal eyes no longer, luit — thanks for the assurance of hope — upon the great 
ocean of eternity, his life, not in the embrace of sleep nor in the apparent 
selfishness of rest, will be in activity of service in a higher and nobler sphere. 
And so another acti\"e. earnest, intellect is stilled; another toiling life is ended. 
Helpless, we pause at its close, and then attempt to tell the story of the years 
of labor, ambition and success which marked an eventful career. Those left 
behind can onlv cherish his memorv and emulate his virtues. 



DAVID E. KELLY. 



The present review deals with the life of a man who is a representative 
member of a family which has been prominent in Clinton county since the 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. IO33 

times of early settlement, whose ability and worth have placed them to the 
front in their undertakings. 

David E. Kelly was born in Center township, Clinton county, Iowa, on 
December 23, 1867, the son of Robert Kelly, Sr., who \vas born in Pennsyl- 
vania in 1 84 1, and Kathleen (Dillhammer) Kelly, also a native of Pennsyl- 
vania. Robert Kelly was the son of Adam Kelly, a well known pioneer of 
Clinton county, who took up government land in Center township in 1853. 
Robert was then twelve years old and grew to manhood on his father's farm, 
helping him to break the virgin soil and make a prosperous farm. When 
twenty-four he bought a farm of his own, and at the time of his death, in 
1905, he owned four hundred and twelve acres in Lincoln township. He was 
a true stockman of the earlier days and spent most of his money and efforts 
in feeding cattle for market, from which he received large returns and made 
a financial success. As were all the Kellys, he was a member of the Presby- 
terian church. 

David E. Kelly was the oldest of the family, and as a lad he had an 
instrumental part in his father's success. He had the following brothers: 
Samuel B., of Brooking, South Dakota; Richard, deceased; Albert Burke, of 
France, Iowa; Robert Bruce, of Lincoln township, a farmer; and Lee C, 
who lives on the homestead in Lincoln township. David received a very 
liberal education, first attending the schools of his township, then of Clinton. 
He spent one year at the Northwestern Illinois College, at Fulton, Illinois; 
one year at Monmouth College, and one year at Dixon College. By this time 
he had learned telegraphy, \vhich he followed for four years. Then he bought 
a farm of three hundred and twenty acres in Benton county, on which he 
lived eleven years, devoting most of his attention to feeding cattle. In Janu- 
ary', 1907, he bought ten acres just west of Clinton, Iowa, in Lincoln town- 
ship, and built for himself a modern residence, well furnished, and large and 
convenient barns. He lives here and supervises his farms, of which he owns 
one in Minnesota and one in Michigan, besides the one in Benton county. 
Though not engaged in active labor, he is yet a busy man, the supervision of 
his farms and other work keeping him employed most of his time. 

On national issues Mr. Kelly is a Repviblican. but in local matters he 
votes for the best man, without regard to party. He has serv^ed as township 
trustee and held other minor offices. In religion he is a Presbyterian, and 
fraternally a member of the blue lodge of Masons. Mr. Kelly is a 
man of strong business ability and high intelligence. As appears above, he has 
unquestionably succeeded in life, and much of his success has been due to the 
fact that he has supplemented his native ability by unremitting hard work. 



I034 CLINTON COUNTY,, IOWA. 

Mr. Kelly was married December 9, 1891, to Lucy O. Goddert, the daugh- 
ter of John and Miriam (Honeyfield) Goddert, both born in England. Mrs. 
Kelly was born December 9, 1861, in England and was two years old when 
her parents came to this country. 

Mr. Goddert and family came to Iowa and settled in Floyd county and 
started farming. He farmed about fifteen years and then came to Clinton 
and started in the grocery business in Chancy, a suburb of Clinton. He was 
postmaster of that place at the time of his death in 1896, and his wife is still 
holding the position. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Kelly, 
in order of birth as follows: Earl B., born May 10, 1895; Claud E., born 
October 10, 1896; Helen I., born March 23, 1903; Marvin L., November 25, 
1905 ; Fern O., August 7, 1907. 



TOHN B. WATKINS. 



Although John B. Watkins has long been sleeping the sleep of the just, 
he is well remembered by those who \vere his associates, for he was a man of 
fine personality and the thousand little acts of kindness accredited to him can- 
not soon be forgotten, his memory being cherished and revered, as it should, 
by those who have survived him. He was for many years very prominent in 
railroad circles of Clinton county and eastern Iowa. 

John Burton Watkins was a native of the state of New York, the son of 
John Watkins, and was born November 7, 1830. He came to Detroit, Michi- 
gan, with his parents when a small boy, and ^vhen a young man went to 
Chicago and began his successful railroad career in the transportation service 
of the Michigan Central railroad. Later he became the station agent of the 
Burlington railroad at Aurora, Illinois, and from there he was transferred to 
Brookfield, Missouri, in like capacity. 

Mr. Watkins came to Clinton county in August, 1866, first as station 
agent and then as master of transportation for the Northwestern railroad, 
which position he occupied, giving his usual high grade service until 1868, 
when he was promoted to assistant superintendent of the East Iowa line of 
this road. He continued in this capacity until the spring of 1871, when he 
was promoted to the position of superintendent of all the lines operated by 
the Northwestern railroad in this state, and at the time of his death was hold- 
ing this position. By his able and judicious management he had attracted the 
admiration of railroad men in the state and won the hearty commendation of 
all concerned, demonstrating his rare executive ability all along the line. 




JOHN B. WATKINS 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. IO35 

Mr. Watkins met death in a tragic manner on October 30, 1873. "^^'' 
Cedar Rapids, Iowa, having been killed while on a passenger train with other 
officials of the road, a freight train crashing into the former. He was buried 
at Aurora, Illinois, where the Watkins family had long resided. He is re- 
membered as a man of remarkable kindness in social intercourse and made 
friends of all with whom he came into contact. During the war of the Rebel- 
lion he was loyal to the Union and served in the Eighty-ninth Illinois Regi- 
ment. Company E. 

Mr. Watkins was married in Dubuque, Iowa, to Miss Louise Willis, who 
was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, June i6, 1837, a daughter of George and 
Harriet (Carpenter) Willis. Of the eight children born to them, five are 
living, viz: James F., of Chicago; John B., of South Omaha, Nebraska; 
Charles V., of Cloqueta, Wisconsin; Willis W., of Menomonie, Wisconsin, 
and Harriett, who is at home. 



MARTIN DOLAN. 



A descendant of an honored and prominent pioneer family of Clinton 
county and a man of great influence in local financial and industrial circles is 
Martin Dolan, vice-president of the Charlotte Savings Bank, a man in whom 
there is a union of such commendable attributes that it is safe to say he would 
wrest success from whatever line of endeavor to which he might turn his at- 
tention. Like other leaders of our citizenship here. Mr. Dolan comes to us 
from the old Empire state, having been born at LUica. New York, November i, 
1852. He was reared to farm pursuits and received a good exemplary educa- 
tion in the district schools. He is the son of John and Catherine (Murphy) 
Dolan, both natives of Ireland, where they grew to maturity and were mar- 
ried, coming to America soon afterward, landing at New York; after stopping 
a while at Utica and other places, he came to Iowa in 1853 ^"^^ entered a small 
tract of land in Washington township, Clinton county, later buying more land 
and making a permanent settlement, and as he was able he continued to add 
to his land until he became the owner of eleven hundred acres. He started his 
place with the usual difficulties incident to life in a new country, but he de- 
veloped an excellent farm from the raw prairie, l^eing a hard worker and a 
good manager, and he always kept a large acreage in a high state of cultiva- 
tion, making elaborate and substantial improvements, having one of the largest 



1036 CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. . 

and best improved farms in the county, finally reaching the goal of his am- 
bitions in the farming line. He took a great interest in educating his children. 
In later life he relaxed somewhat from the hard toil of his earlier years. He 
was always an extensive stock raiser and often bought stock to make up car 
loads and would feed them out for the market and ship them to Chicago. As 
soon as his son, Martin, was old enough he gave him charge of the stock 
shipping, and he assisted his father, in fact, in all branches of his extensive 
operations. 

When John Dolan first came to this county he found a wild country, 
sparsely settled, where much game abounded. His nearest trading point was 
Lyons, that being before the days of Clinton. He also did much of his trad- 
ing at Camanche. There were but a few houses between his place and Lyons 
and he felt the lack of good roads and many other things such as we of today 
enjoy, but he was a man of sterling characteristics and nothing daunted him, 
and he became prominent as a farmer and stock man, being influential and 
highly respected throughout the locality. He liked to relate reminiscences of 
the early days when he did his milling at the old historic mill at Hauntown 
on the Elk river. Wheat often sold as low as forty cents per bushel, pork 
three dollars per one hundred pounds ; later he received as high as thirteen dol- 
lars and fifty cents per one hundred pounds for his pork. He 'was a keen 
obsetwer and kept well posted. He was a highly educated man, having at- 
tended good schools in his native land, and he could read and write the Gaelic 
language. He was a business man of more than ordinary ability and he did 
a noble work in starting the physical and moral development of the county 
and in laying the foundations for good government, and no man is worthier 
of a place in the history of Clinton county than he. Politically, Mr. Dolan 
was a strong Democrat and he never failed to vote ; he always endeavored to 
use his influence to get good men on the ticket, but never aspired to political 
ofiice himself. He was a good mixer and had a host of friends. He was 
charitable to the needy and a good friend of the afflicted and homeless. His 
integrity and honor were above reproach. He was a loyal member of the 
Catholic church and he brought up his children in that faith and they are de- 
voted to the mother church, three daughters having become sisters and are de- 
voting their lives to the church. 

Patrick Murphy, father of Catherine Murphy, wife of John Dolan, was 
for tlie market. He was a plain, quiet home man, a worthy member of the 
a native of Ireland, where he married and from which country he emigrated to 
Clinton county, Iowa, in 1853, where he bought raw land and improved a good 
farm, becoming prominent as a general farmer and stock raiser, feeding cattle 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA, IO37 

Catholic church. He spent the rest of his hfe in this county. In his family 
were six children, the mother of Martin Dolan, of this review, being the sec- 
ond in order of birth. 

Thirteen children were born to Mr. and Mrs. John Dolan, eleven of 
whom grew to maturity, namely : Martin, of this review ; Thomas, Catherine ; 
Mary, Sister Genivieve, of Washington, D. C. ; Ann. Sister Angelica, of 
Sinsinawa, Wisconsin; Sarah, Sister Josepha, at Rockwell, Iowa; 
Eliza, Michael, Jane, Theresa and Eva. The mother of these children, a 
woman of beautiful traits, passed to her rest in 1889, and the father in 1897. 

Martin Dolan, the son, was a small child when he was brought to this 
county by his parents. He remained under his parental roof, assisting with 
the general work about the place and attending the district schools until his 
marriage, when he took up farming for himself and engaged in general farm- 
ing and stock raising, carrying forward the work inaugurated by his father. 
He bought, fed and shipped large numbers of cattle, hogs and other live stock 
at all seasons, continuing to give his attention almost exclusively to general 
farming, stock raising and shipping and has been very successful and ranks 
with the leading business men and citizens of his community. At the late re- 
organizing of the Charlotte Savings Bank he bought stock and was made vice- 
president at the meeting of the first directory, having assisted in the organiza- 
tion ; he is also a director in this institution and he has continued to hold these 
positions, discharging his duties in a manner that reflects much credit upon 
his ability and to the entire satisfaction of all concerned. He is president of 
the Woodmen Association, which is working for the general advancement of 
the town of Charlotte. They have erected a substantial brick house, the lower 
floor being occupied by the Farmers & Merchants Savings Bank and the upper 
floor by the Woodmen lodge. Mr. Dolan is a member of the W^oodmen of 
American and also the Knights of Columbia. He was reared in the Catholic 
church and has adhered to that faith tenaciously. Politically, he is loyal to 
the Democratic party, and he has filled the office of county supervisor by ap- 
pointment; in fact, he has filled all township offices and for the past twenty- 
three y-ears he has been treasurer of the school board, which office he yet holds. 
He is a strong worker in the party and all the positions of trust he has been 
called upon to fill he has discharged in a most faithful manner, reflecting credit 
upon himself and giving general satisfaction. He keeps well advised on all 
current matters. He has been very successful in all relations with the business 
world and is an excellent financier, by nature an organizer and promoter, a 
man of sound judgment and scrupulously honest. 

Martin Dolan w^as married to Ellen Burk, who was born in Clinton county, 



1038 CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 

Iowa, September 17, i860, the daughter of a prominent and highly respected 
family and she herself a lady of refinement and many strong characteristics. 
She is the daughter of Patrick Burk, a native of Ireland and an early settler 
in Clinton county, where he improved a good farm and carried on general 
farming and stock raising and became prominent in his community. He was 
a Democrat, but led a quiet life, never aspiring to public office. He was a 
worthy member of the Catholic church, and in his family were eleven children, 
Ellen, wife of the subject, being the fourth in order of birth. There were 
eighteen children born to Mr. and Mrs. Dolan, thirteen of whom are still 
living, all well educated and well established in life. They are, Gertrude, a 
school teacher; John is farming in Cavour, South Dakota; Regina, a Sister, is 
located at Minneapolis, Minnesota; Jerome is farming in this county; Oswald 
is farming in Washington township, Iowa; Benaditti and Martin are at home; 
Patrick is attending school at Dubucjue, Iowa ; Thomas is also living in 
Dubuque ; Theresa is at home ; Justin, Benita and Cyrella are all at home. 

Martin Dolan started on a tour of Europe in the spring of 1910, visiting 
England, and Ireland, the land of his ancestors, making a thorough tour of 
that country, her places of historic interest and renown, old churches, the tombs 
of many of her famous early leaders, great monuments, beautiful lakes, the 
homesteads of his forebears, his trip not only resulting in a great deal of 
pleasure but profit in an intellectual way also, and his diary, which he kept all 
during his sojourn abroad, is very interesting and instructive. 

Mr. Dolan is planning to retire from the farm to Charlotte, where he 
erected in 19 10 a modernly equipped, commodious, attractive and, in fact, one 
of the finest residences in this part of the county. This is one of the best 
known and most highly respected families in Clinton county and its several 
members are in every way deserving of the high esteem in which thev have 
alwavs been held. 



ALBERT H. STUEDEMANN. 

In looking over the long list of enterprising German and German-Ameri- 
can citizens in Clinton county, Iowa, the name of Albert H. Stuedemann, of 
Center township, is soon met with, he being of the second generation in this 
country, and the manner in which he is conducting his afifairs on his fine farm 
indicates that he is deserving of a place among the thriftiest. He was born 
in this county on December 7, 1856, and he is the son of Frederick and 
Frederika (Koepke) Stuedemann, natives of Germany who came to America 






MUE NRW YORK 
BLrc LIBRARY 



Tii ;ONS 

B ^ 




MRS. MARV STUEDEMANN 




ALBERT H. STUEDEMANN 



"W YOf 






CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. ^ IO39 

in 1854. They were the parents of two children, Albert H., of this review, 
and Ida, now Mrs. L. A. Pohlman. The father of these children was bom 
on May i, 1824, and was reared and educated in the fatherland. Upon com- 
ing to America he located in Clinton county and established a good home 
here; his death occurred on August 27, 1867. His wife, Who was born on 
February 17, 1832, survived him thirty-nine years, dying on November 24, 
1906. They were married on May 24, 1854. 

Albert H. Stuedemann received the advantages of an excellent education 
in the common schools. He was married on July 2, 1879, to Mary Grantz, 
who was born on September 29, 1856, the daughter of John and Elsal^ea 
Grantz, who were natives of Germany and who came to America about 1854, 
locating in Clinton county, Iowa. Mrs. Stuedemann was born in Clinton. 
She is one of a family of seven children, of whom she has two brothers and 
three sisters living. Mrs. Stuedemann's parents were both born and raised 
in Germany, and came over after they were married, and came to Clinton 
county and went to farming. 

Mr. Stuedemann purchased the old home place and has continued to live 
on the same, making very extensive improvements and he has been a very suc- 
cessful farmer and stock raiser, everything about his place denoting that he 
is a man of good management and believes in keeping fully abreast of the 
times. He is regarded as one of the successful farmers and business men of 
his township, in fact he is one of the leading agriculturists of Clinton county 
and his farm is one of the model places of this locality. He has added to his 
original purchase until he now has a place of four hundred acres, of fine, till- 
able land, in his home farm, besides a large tract of land he purchased in 
Arkansas, where two of his sons are engaged in farming, making a specialty 
of raising rice, making a success there. 

The subject is widely known as a successful feeder and raiser of Short- 
horn cattle and draft horses, also blooded mares. Of such superior grade is 
his live stock that he finds a veiy ready sale for all that he places on the 
market. 

Mr. Stuedemann has long taken an abiding interest in political affairs and 
he is regarded as one of the local leaders in the Democratic party, his advice 
and counsel being often sought in campaigns and local matters. He has 
served his county in a very creditable and acceptable manner as supervisor 
for two terms, his last term of office having only recantly expired. He and 
his family are faithful members of the Lutheran church. 

Nine interesting children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Stuedemann, 
namely: Anther, born February 24, 1882; Bernhart, born October 12, 1884; 



I040 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

Ida, born April 3, 1886; Fred, born September 27, 1887; Alfred, born Novem- 
ber 3, 1889; Edward, born June 27, 1891 ; Grover and Elsie (twins), bom 
June 16, 1894; Lydia, born July 23, 1897. 

No family stands higher in the esteem of their neighbors and in all cir- 
cles in the community than this and they are influential and people whom it is 
a pleasure to know. Mr. Stuedemann and his sons are very successful raisers 
or rice. In 1910 Mr. Stuedemann and son raised eleven thousand bushels of 
rice, on one hundred and forty-five acres of land in Arkansas and sold the same 
at one dollar and two cents per bushel. Fraternally, Mr. Stuedemann is a 
member of the Modern Woodmen of America. 



EDWIN W. MILLER. 

The old-fashioned notion that hard work, patient industry and far- 
sightedness make for success in the various avenues of life does not seem to 
be accepted so unreservedly in our day. The spread of pessimism engendered 
by many iihases of our complex life is in a great measure responsible for the 
lack of faith in the old idea. However, if we observe conditions closely we 
will find that the intelligent individual, who leads a practical and industrious 
life, will reach a point of success commensurate with his efforts. The life 
of Edwin W. Miller, noted as a dealer in fresh water pearls at Camanche, 
Iowa, is an instance of this. 

Mr. Miller was born September 26, 1873, i" Clinton county, Iowa, the 
scion of one of the sterling old families of this locality, being the son of 
Marouis nnd Hannah (Simmon?) Miller, nntives of Germany, where thev 
grew to maturity, "were educated and married. From that country they emi- 
grated to the United States in 1852 and settled in Clinton county, Iowa, pur- 
chasing a good farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Eden township, where 
he established a good home and reared his family of fifteen children, of whom 
ten are now living. In 1865 the elder Miller moved his family to Camanche 
and engaged in the saw-mill business. His death occurred on July 28, 1886, 
at the age of sixty-two years. This was also the age attained by his wife, 
who, however, survived him until March 17, 1901. 

Edwin W. Miller, of this review, was reared to manhood and during his 
boyhood he received a good common school education and remained at home 
until reaching maturity. On November 2, 1904, he was married to Alta 
Grace Hugunin, the accomplished daughter of Charles and Kate (Sweeney) 



TEr j?iDr vmc ' 
PUBircifB.'URY 



ABTon, V^'t)'- 

I? 




MRS. ALTA MILLER 




EDWIN W. MILLER 



THE NEW YORK 

rVBLFC LIBiURY 



, UcNDATlONS 



CLINTON COUNTY. IOWA. IO4I 

Hugunin, an excellent old family of this county. Mr. and Mrs. Miller began 
their married life in their present home, a beautiful and neatly kept cottage in 
Camanche. For a number of years Mr. Miller has been successfully engaged 
in the business of buying and selling pearls, being well known in this industry. 
He turns in excess of one hundred thousand dollars annually in his business. 

Mr. Miller is a highly respected citizen of this township, and he takes 
considerable interest in the affairs of his community. He served the town 
of Camanche as alderman for a number of years. Fraternally he is a mem- 
ber of the Modem Woodmen of America and of the Modern Brotherhood. 
His wife belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church and he is an attendant 
and liberal contributor to the same. 

Mr. and Mrs. Miller are the parents of two sons. McClelland, born De- 
cember 10. 1907, and Edward, born January 29. 1910. Personally, Mr. 
Miller is a very pleasant gentleman, fair and straightforward in all his dealings 
with his fellow men, and he and his wife are esteemed in all circles for their 
cordiality and genial natures. 



CHARLES V. MILLER. 

Although his opportunities to procure the thorough education for which 
he yearned were limited and his early environment none too auspicious, Charles 
V. Miller, widely known as a pearl dealer, with his place of business at Caman- 
clie. Clinton county. Iowa, has been exceptionally successful in the battle of 
life, being today known as one of the substantial citizens of his township. 
His entire career has been characerized by industry and determination to over- 
come all obstacles in his efforts to make his way in the world. 

Mr. Miller was born February 14. 1867, in Clinton county, Iowa, and he 
is the son of Marquis and Hannah (Simmons) Miller, who were natives of 
Germany. The mother came to this country when five years old. The father 
was educated in Germany. They \vere married in Buffalo, New York. They 
came to America about 18^2 and went to Kane county, Illinois, and from there 
came to Clinton county, Iowa, buying one hundred and sixty acres in Eden 
township He developed the place and made a good home there. In 1866 
he moved to Camanche and worked at the saw-mill business. His death oc- 
curred on July 28. 1886, at the age of sixty-two years. His wife died March 
17, 1901. also at the age of sixty-two years. They are both buried at Caman- 
che. Fifteen children were born to them, ten of whom are living. 

(66) 



1042 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

Charles V. Miller, of this review, received a common school education 
and grew to maturity in this county. He has been twice married. To the 
first union were born a son and a daughter, Harriet S., born May 18, 1891, 
and Benjamin J., borm April i, 1894. On May 19, 1903, Mr. Miller was again 
married, his last wife being Mrs. Lucy Harmon, who was the adopted daugh- 
ter of Robert Hogle, of this county, and who was a well known politician, and 
was elected sheriff of Clinton county by the Republicans, in which party he 
was very active. By her first marriage Mrs. Miller became the mother of 
two children, Robert and Burton Harmon. One daughter was born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Miller, Lola M., a bright and beautiful little girl, born November 

5. 1907- 

Since their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Miller have lived in Camanche. In 

May, 1908, they built a modern residence with every late convenience, and 
this is one of the best and most attractive homes in the town. 

Mr. Miller has engaged in the fresh water pearl industry for a number 
of years, classified as pearls, slugs and nuggets, of which he has made a suc- 
cess, turning many thousands of dollars annually in the pearl trade among the 
pearl merchants of Camanche. He has always manifested excellent business 
judgment and is a persistent worker, consequently he has made a success of 
his life work and at the same time won and held the confidence and good will 
of a host of friends. 



JOHN C. BRANDENBURG. 

The subject of this sketch has been a life-long resident of Clinton county, 
and, having borne a manly part in developing the resources of the township 
in whicli he resides and contrilmted to the social and moral uplift of the com- 
munity, it is with much satisfaction that the following brief review of his 
career is accorded a place in these pages. The Brandenburg family came from 
Germany and was first represented in the United States by the subject's grand- 
parents, Fritz and Marie Brandenburg, natives of Pomerania, who crossed 
the Atlantic a number of years ago, and settled in Clinton county, Iowa, locat- 
ing near the town of Andover, where one of their sons had previously settled. 
He died in 1908, being survived by his wife, who lived in Hampshire township 
and died February 23, 1911. Fritz Brandenburg, Jr., the subject's father, also 
a native of Germany, married, in the fatherland, a Miss Wall, and later came 
to America, nroceeding direct from New York City to Clinton county, Iowa, 
and settling in Elk River township, where he supported his family for some 
time by daily labor. In a few years he bought eighty acres of land in the 




MR. AND MRS. JOHN C. BRANDENBURG 



. -.1-^ ♦ 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. ¥>4^ 

township of Hampshire, which he developed and otherwise improved, and it 
was not long until he had a good farm and comfortable home, which he and 
his faithful wife still occupy. Mr. Brandenburg is a quiet, law-abiding citizen 
who lives at peace with his neighbors, attends strictly to his own interests, 
and wields an influence for good in the community. As a farmer he has been 
reasonably successful and is now in comfortable circumstances, with a suffi- 
ciency of this world's goods in his possession to render him free from care. 
All of his four children are living and highly esteemed in their respective places 
of abode. 

John C. Brandenburg is a native of Hampshire township, and dates his 
birth from November i, 1884, having first seen the light of day not far from 
the place where he now lives. He was reared to habits of industry, early 
learned by practical experience the true meaning of honest toil, and as soon as 
his services could be utilized he bore his full share in the cultivation of the 
farm. He attended the public schools during his childhood and youth and in 
early manhood began life for himself as a tiller of the soil. Since 1907 he has 
had charge of the home farm and his success in the interim has been marked 
and continuous. He devotes his attention to general agriculture and the raising 
of improved breeds of live stock, uses improved machinery and modern meth- 
ods in his work, and has so managed his affairs that he is now on the high- 
road to prosperity and fortune. 

Although a young man, Mr. Brandenburg has become a factor of con- 
siderable influence in his township, not only as a farmer, but as an intelligent, 
wide-awake citizen, who believes in progress and bends all of his energies in 
the direction of the same. He aids, to the extent of his ability, all enterprises- 
for the advancement of the community and the general good of his fellow- 
men, stands for law and order, and gives his influence to what he considers the 
right side of every moral question. He is a Democrat in politics, but has no 
ambition for ofiice or any kind of public distinction; his religious creed is 
represented by the Lutheran church. 

Mr. Brandenburg was happily married on the i8th of March, 1908, to 
Clara Fangers, the union resulting in the birth of two children, Marvin, who 
died in infancy, and Raymond, born August 26, 19 10. Mrs. Brandenburg is 
also a Lutheran in l^elief and a faithful and devoted member of the local 
church to which she belongs. She is a woman of excellent character and repu- 
tation, a true helpmeet who enters heartily into all of her Imsband's plans and 
co-operates with him in carrying them to completion. Both husband and 
wife are esteemed very highly 1)y their neighbors and friends, and, being in 
the prime of life and full of hope, it is eminently fitting to predict for them a 
future of great promise and usefulness. 



1044 CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 

GEORGE MAC MILLER. 

One of the progressive citizens of Camanche township, Clinton county, 
who is eminently deserving of the high esteem in which he is held and of the 
large success he has attained is George Mac Miller, who was born February 
II, 1863, in this county. He is the son of Marquis and Hannah (Simmons) 
Miller, who were natives of Germany, from which country they came to the 
United States when voung and were married here. They came to Clinton 
countv Iowa, about 1852 and purchased a farm of one hundred and sixty acres 
in Eden township. In 1865 Mr. Miller sold his farm, taking in part payment 
property in Camanche where he moved his family and engaged in the saw-mill 
business. The father died on July 28, 1886, at the age of sixty-two years; 
the mother died March 17, 1901, also in her sixty-second year. They were 
both buried at Camanche cemetery. Politically Marquis Miller was a Demo- 
crat and he was a member of the Lutheran church and his Wife of the 
Methodist church. They were the parents of fifteen children, of whom ten 
are living, namely : Sophia, now Mrs. Owens; Hannah, now Mrs. Weltep; 
George Mac, of this review; Jennie, now Mrs. Skiff; Lillie, now Mrs. Swarm; 
Charles ; Emma, now Mrs. Gice ; May, now Mrs. Lowe ; Benjamin and Eddie ; 
those deceased are, Andrew, Mrs. Carrie White, Marquis, Oxford and one 
who died in infancy, unnamed. 

George Mac Miller received a good common school education, and on 
Mav 8. t886, he was married to Emma Byers. daughter of David and Eliza- 
beth r Shannon) Byers, of Albany, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Miller began their 
married life at Camanche. In 1887 they moved into their present home, 
which they built ; they have in many ways improved their property, having one 
of the best residences in town. Mrs. Miller's father was in the Union army 
for three years, a member of Company F, Fifty-second Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry. He was honorably discharged on account of sickness before the 
war was over. Mr. Miller has been engaged for a number of years in the 
pearl industry, for which Camanche is noted, also for her clam business. He 
has been very successful in this line of business. He is also a dealer in furs. 
He annually handles many thousands of dollars and is a well known and suc- 
cessful business man. 

Mr. and Mrs. Miller and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church and he is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, also of the 
Modern Brotherhood. In politics he is a Democrat. 

Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Miller, n^melv : Georgia 
M., now Mrs Gordon, was born on December 5, 1888, and she is a graduate 



PlJx. 



AS" 
Till), 
R 




MRS. GEORGE MAC MILLER 




GEORGE MAC MILLER 






'^"^ ^muss 






CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. IO45 

of the Camanche schools, also of the art school of Clinton; Winnie L., born 
December 2, 1890, is a graduate of the Camanche schools and she is attending 
the Clinton schools, having had two years in music ; Harold was born October 
22, 1896, and died June 2, 1897; Virginia B., born May 27, 1898, is attending 
the Camanche high school, and she is also taking music lessons. Upon the 
death of her mother Alice Georgia Blakely was taken by Mr. and Mrs. Miller 
and reared by them from the time she was two years old. She was bom on 
February 19, 1903, and she is cared for with all the tenderness shown their 
own children. Mr. and Mrs. Miller are very pleasant people and their beauti- 
ful home is known as a place of hospitality to their many friends and admirers. 



THOMAS FARRELL. 



The name of Thomas Farrell has for more than a quarter of a century 
been a very familiar one in Deep Creek township, of which he has been 
trustee for thirty years, and he has long been prominently identified with farm- 
ing and business interests. He lias done much for the general development 
of his community, for which he has the hearty thanks of all citizens. Mr. 
Farrell was born in county Ca\-in, Ireland, November 18, 1848, and was 
brought to America by his parents when about one year old, and was reared 
and educated here. He is the son of Martin and Mary (Terney) Farrell, both 
of Ireland, where they were married and settled to farming, and in 1849 ^^'^^~ 
grated to America and first located in Ohio, remaining there four years on 
rented farms. About 1853 they came to Clinton county, Iowa, and bought 
eighty acres of land, raw prairie, which he improved and farmed. He was 
short of money and had to work hard and use economy to keep his "family 
together. He later added to his land and owned at one time six hundred 
acres, which he later divided among his sons. At first he had to go to Iowa 
City for his milling, a long distance, and there were many other inconven- 
iences, too numerous to mention, which he found in the undeveloped country. 
With others that came to the new land, he underwent many deprivations and 
hardships which fell to their lot, and with those that came first started the 
moral and physical development of the county and iielped lay the foundation 
for good government. He was a strong Democrat, but was no ofifice seeker. 
He was a constant and worthy member of the Catholic church. He was a 
general farmer and raised some stock, remaining at the old home until death 
claimed him. He was well known and highly respected and his integrity and 



1046 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

honor above reproach. His wife survived him two years and died in 1901. 
Mrs. Farrell's father, Thomas Turney, settled with his son. He reared six 
children, and the mother of the subject was the second daughter. 

There were born to Mr. and Mrs. Martin Farrell ten children. All lived 
to maturity and all married but James and John, both yet single: Richard 
died in this township; Bridget became Mrs. Thomas Manning, and she died, 
leaving five sons; Thomas, the subject; Peter died, leaving a large family, 
four sons and four daughters; Ann J., who became the wife of Timothy Cren- 
nen. died in Minnesota, and left seven children ; Marie is now Mrs. Laughlin, 
of Bryant; Catherine, Mrs. Hand, of this county; James is farming on the 
homestead ; John is in the creamery business in Goose Lake ; Martin is a 
farmer in this township. 

Thomas Farrell was born in the old country and was reared in Ohio 
and Iowa, and he remained under the parental roof until he married, in 1876, 
then settled to farming in Washington township. He later moved to his 
vacant land inherited from his father, which he improved in cultivation and 
where he vet resides on one hundred and sixty acres, to which he has added 
adjoining land of forty acres; another survey of one hundred and sixty acres 
he bought in 1901, an improved farm which he rents to his son. He has done 
general farming and raised all kinds of stock except mules and has been very 
successful. He has now retired from active farming and rents the farm to 
two sons, Joe and Ellis, and anticipates retiring to Lyons. He has always sup- 
ported the Democratic party and has filled many township and school offices. 
He was elected trustee in 1879, and has been elected continuously since, but 
has now dropped out to let some younger man take hold of the work. He has 
filled all positions creditably to himself and satisfactorily to the people. He 
also holds a position on the church committee. He was reared in the Catholic 
church, from which faith he has never departed. He is well known and highly 
respected. 

Thomas Farrell married Julia Crowe, who was born in Kenosha county, 
Wisconsin, February 6. 1857, a worthy wife and good helpmate. She is 
the daughter of Michael and Bridget (Laughlin) Crowe, both from Ireland, 
who first settled in \\^isconsin, he a wagonmaker and blacksmith, which 
trade he followed through active life and died in Wisconsin in the prime 
of manhood, about thirty-eight years old. His wife survived and came 
to Clinton county. Iowa, and later married James Sullivan, a farmer near 
Bryant, who has retired to Lyons. Three sons and four daughters were 
born to her last marriage. There was one daughter l)y the Crowe marriage. 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. IO47 

the wife of the subject. Her parents and family are all members of the 
Catholic church. Mr. Sullivan is also a Catholic. 

Thomas Farrell and wife are the parents of seven children, namely: 
James P. is yet single and he is a farmer; Joseph is single and a farmer; 
Mary died at the age of ten years and eleven months; Winifred is the 
wife of Gust Thiesen, a prominent farmer; Elliott, Julia and Blanche are 
all at home. 



LEWIS RUGGEBERG. 

The subject of this review was born in Clinton county, Iowa, two miles 
south of Elwood, on the i8th of May, 1866, and is a son of Julius H. and 
Lizette (Metberg) Ruggeberg, natives of Westphalia, Germany. In 1853, 
Julius H. Ruggeberg and family immigrated to America and spent the en- 
suing five years in Le Clair, Scott county, Iowa, where for some time he sup- 
ported himself and those dependent upon him by daily labor, later renting a 
farm in the vicinity of the town. At the expiration of the period indicated 
he moved to Clinton county and purchased forty acres of land in Brookfield 
township where he lived for eight years, when he sold the place and bought a 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres two miles south of Elwood. From 
1858, the year of his arrival in Clinton county, dates his success as a farmer 
and land owner. He was soon able to add to his real estate and by judicious 
investments from time to time finally became the owner of eight hundred 
acres of fine land, all in Clinton county, except one hundred and sixty acres, 
which he bought in the county of Jackson. 

Mr. Ruggel^erg was a man of patriotic impulses, a great lover of the 
Union and while the Civil war was in progress was unremitting in his efforts 
to induce young men to enlist, besides in various other ways upholding the 
honor of his adopted country. Previous to his retirement, he rented his 
lands to his children, and later sold out to them on easy payments, the subject 
of this sketch purchasing the one hundred and sixty acres in Brookfield town- 
ship, upon which he now lives. Mrs. Ruggeberg died on the 28th of June, 
1899. Since discontinuing active work, Mr. Ruggeberg has been living a 
retired life at Lost Nation, 'where, surrounded by his friends, he is spending 
his closing years in the enjoyment of the results of his many years of suc- 
cessful effort. Of the nine children born to this estimable couple, three sur- 
vive and are among the highly respected people of their respective com- 
munities. 



1048 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

Lewis Ruggeberg was reared to agricultural pursuits and received his 
education in the district schools of Brookfield township. He early matured 
his plans for the future and with rare tenacity has carried out the same, being 
at this time one of the leading farmers of Brookfield township, and as a citizen 
occupies a large place in the public view. As already stated, he purchased of 
his father the fine farm on which he now lives and which, under his effective 
labors and excellent management, has been greatly improved, and is today one 
of the most valuable places of its area in the county, besides affording the 
owner a model rural home in which few features are lacking. Mr. Rugge- 
berg pursues sound practical intelligence, prosecutes his labors according to 
the most approved modern methods and believes in the honor and dignity of 
his calling. He has been more than ordinarily successful as a general farmer 
and raiser of fine breeds of live stock, is a good manager and has so conducted 
his affairs as to no longer be obliged to apply himself to hard work, being in 
independent circumstances with an ample competence laid up for the future. 

In politics Mr. Ruggeberg is a Republican and an ardent supporter of his 
party and its candidates. He has been honored by the voters of his township 
with various positions of trust, including those of assessor, in which he served 
four years, trustee four years and several terms as clerk of school board, in 
all of which offices he discharged his duties faithfully and well. 

On February 28, 1894, Mr. Ruggeberg was happily married to Rosetta 
A. Hansell, of Clinton county, Iowa, daughter of David G. and Amanda E. 
Hansell, who moved to this county in 1868 from Illinois and to the latter 
state as early as 1840. Mrs. Hansell, whose maiden name was Amanda E. 
Morris, was descended from one of the Pilgrims who came over in the 
"Mayflower" ; her father was a Scotchman and a veteran of the late Civil 
war, in which he served with distinction as a member of Company G, One 
Hundred and Twelfth Illinois Infantry. Mr. and Mrs. Ruggeberg have had 
four children, namely: Alma Bernice, Marvin R., Wilma and one, the third 
in order of birth, that died in infancy. 



CHARLES E. ROSCOE. 

The fact that Charles E. Roscoe, of Camanche, Clinton county, has spent 
his life in this community, having lived through the various epochs from the 
days of the pioneer to the opulent present and taken part in it all or at least 



THE ^'Ti'v/ "^-'^^^ 
..CTOR W.SOX, A^D , 

nR 




CHARLES E. ROSCOE 




MRS. CVNIHIA ROSCOE 



jm ^^^'^ 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. IO49 

a keen observer of each gradation is enough to entitle him to a place in this 
history ; but there are other reasons, among which is the fact that his life has 
always been led along upright and consei'vative lines and that he is the repre- 
sentative of a highly honored old family, well known in the eastern part of the 
county. 

Air. Roscoe was born in this county, December 12, 1846. and he is the 
son of Boughton and Mary (Washburn) Roscoe. The father was a native 
of New York state, from which state he came to Ohio in an early day, locating 
there. After remaining in the Buckeye state a few years he, in the spring of 
1846, settled in Clinton county, Iowa, obtaining three hundred and twenty 
acres in Camanche township, purchasing a claim here, which had some im- 
pro^'ements on it. He had a veiy good farm and comfortable home in due 
course of time and devoted his attention to general farming and stock raising. 
He was one of the territorial settlers in this county. He was highly respected 
and well known among the early settlers. The date of his birth was January, 
1806, and his death occurred June 9, 1892; his wife was born June 13, 1806, 
and her death occurred February 28, 1886. They were the parents of seven 
children, of whom three are living, Wallace, W. H., of Humboldt county, 
California; Samantha (deceased): Eliza (deceased); John B., of Pueblo, 
Colorado; and Charles E., of this review. ' 

The subject of this sketch received a common school education in the 
schools of his neighborhood which he attended during the winter months, 
working on the home farm in the summer time. On October 15, 1870, he was 
married to Cynthia Leach, daughter of Hiram and Edith (How) Leach, of 
this county. Her parents were natives of New York state, and they came to 
Clinton county, Iowa, in 1862, locating in Camanche where he was engaged 
as an oculist. He was located a few years at Fulton, Illinois, in the same line 
of work and was vevy capable and popular in his calling. His death occurred 
on May 9, 1903, at the advanced age of eighty- four years. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe began their married life in Nebraska and after a 
residence of two years and six months there they came to Clinton county, 
Iowa, in 1872. Their first purchase of land was a forty-acre farm. They 
later added to this as they prospered until they now have a fine farm of two 
hundred acres, most of which is well improved. Mr. Roscoe has placed sub- 
stantial and convenient buildings on his place and farming and stock raising 
have occupied his attention. He raises a good grade of stock and feeds for 
the market. He is regarded as a very successful farmer and business man. 
He has served his township as trustee and assessor. He is a public spirited, 
well read man, a leader in local affairs. Often disputes arising in his neigh- 



1050 CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 

borhood are left for him to arbitrate. He has the undivided confidence of his 
neighbors and friends, being regarded by them as strictly honest and upright 
in all his dealings. In 1905 he rented his farm and moved to Camanche, pur- 
chasing good property here, but while he is living practically retired, he spends 
much of his time looking after his farm work. He has served as street com- 
missioner of Camanche. Politically, he is a Republican. He and his wife 
are members of the Baptist church and he is a deacon in the same. 

One son, Ivan B., was born to Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe, on November 5, 
1874. He has remained unmarried, received a good education and is an ex- 
cellent business man, being engaged in the telephone business at Pendleton, 
Oregon, holding a very responsible position there. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe took her sister's child, Hope Wilson, \vhen three 
days old. now an estimable young lady who makes her home with them. She 
was born January 18, 1885, and was educated in the local schools. 



MADISON L. CHRISTIAN. 

The prosperity and substantial \velfare of a city are in a large measure 
due to the enterprise and wise foresight of its business men. It is progressive, 
wide-awake men of affairs that make tlie real history of a communitv, and 
their influence in shaping and directing its varied interests is difficult to esti- 
mate. The well known gentleman of whom the biographer writes in this con- 
nection has long ranked among the leading business men of Clinton, and it is 
to such enterprising spirits as he that the city is indebted for its recent sub- 
stantial growth and for the high position it occupies as a center of industrial 
activity and progress. 

Madison L. Christian, superintendent of the American Wire Cloth Com- 
pany, is the scion of an excellent and well established old Southern family, his 
birth having occurred at Cloverport, Kentucky, on February 4, 1865, and he 
is the son of Dr. John F. and Sarah E. (Newman) Christian. The latter's 
grandfather, Col. Edmond Newman, was a prominent officer in the American 
Revolution under Washington. They were of an old Virginia family, and 
the Colonel himself came to Kentucky shortly after the Revolutionary war. 
He brought the family with him and they invaded the wilds of that early day 
when ''the dark and bloody ground'' was still the haunt of the red man and 
wild beast. The Colonel's son. Obadiah Newman, was the grandfather of 
Madison L. Christian, of this review. As intimated, the entire familv came 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. IO5I 

west together and there the Colonel spent the rest of his life and is buried in 
the Blue Grass state, and his monument bears the inscription, "A colonel under 
George Washington and a Mason." All members of this family except the 
mother died in Kentucky. 

The subject's grandparents on both his father and mother's side were also 
natives of Virginia, from which state they came to Kentucky when Louisville 
was a village. Doctor and Mrs. John F. Christian were married in Kentucky, 
and there the Doctor successfully followed his profession until his death in 
1878. He was an influential and highly esteemed man and eminent physician 
in the early days of Kentucky. His widow is still living in Clinton at the 
advanced age of eighty-two years. She is a woman of gracious personality 
and has a host of warm personal friends here and in her old home. Five 
children were born to the Doctor and wife, two of whom died in infancy, and 
one daughter died in young womanhood. One son lives in Nebraska, engaged 
in the ministry of the Baptist church, the Rev. Samuel O. Christian. The 
father w'as a prominent politician in Kentucky and w^as well known as an 
orator, and many of the "old-timers" there still speak of his influence during 
campaigns, and especially of his great speech in introducing Humphrey 
Marshall. Among the schoolmates of the Doctor's wife were Gen. Eli 
Murray, once governor of Utah; ex-Governor Crittenden, of Missouri; and 
other men who became prominent. The Doctor was a believer in the rights 
of the South, but also in preserving the Union. A brother of the Doctor's wife 
was a soldier in the Confederate army and was a member of the famous 
"Orphans' Brigade," and he died in prison at Alton. Illinois. 

Madison L. Christian was educated in the country schools of Highlands, 
Kentucky, just across the river from Cincinnati, Ohio, wdiere Fort Thomas 
is now located. After passing through the common school, he Avent to work 
in a rolling mill at the age of fifteen years. His father had died when he 
was but thirteen years old and it became necessary for him to start out in life 
at a tender age. After working several years there, he served an apprentice- 
ship as a pattern maker and then as a machinist, afterwards becoming foreman 
of the shop in which he had served as apprentice. He later entered the Fred 
J. Myers shop at Covington, Kentucky, later of Hamilton, Ohio, as foreman 
of the machine shop, and remained there fifteen years as foreman and master 
mechanic, leaving this establishment in 190 1 for the purpose of coming west 
to put in a novelty plant at Dixon, Illinois, with the Reynolds Wire Company, 
for the manufacture of sifters, corn-poppers, etc. He remained with this 
company for two years as master mechanic. Upon leaving the same he 
entered the foundry and machine shop business at Cloverport, Kentucky, his 



1052 CLINTON COUNTY,, IOWA. 

birthplace. After organizing the plant there and operating the same a short 
time, he was induced by Mr. Reynolds, who had organized the American Wire 
Cloth Company at Clinton, Iowa, to leave Cloverport, and install the machin- 
ery for the new company at Clinton, about March i, 1904. He did so and, 
upon coming to Clinton, made the necessary drawings, patterns, etc., taking 
up his permanent residence here about April i. 1904. He got out the first 
loom as a model in the little building known as Lamberson's carpenter shop, on 
the comer of Second and Oak streets. After the completion of the model 
loom they moved into the Produce building on Second street and Eighth 
avenue, where Walkers machine shop was located, the first sixty looms being 
built in that shop. By the time they were completed, in the fall of 1905, the 
new building had been finished and the company moved into new quarters 
opposite Howe street, between the Northwestern tracks and the river. At 
that time the output amounted to about three and one half million feet of wire 
cloth. The firm has had a rapid and continuous growth until during the year 
1909 about ten million square feet were turned out, and during the year 19 10 
the figures reached about twelve million square feet. About one hundred 
people are employed at present, whereas at the start there were but thirty-five. 
The products are distributed mainly throuehout the West, this being the far- 
fl-^gcf vest of ?iny wire cloth company. The trade is rapidly growing and the 
demand for these products, \vhich seem to be of a much superior grade, is 
rapidly increasing. The first officers of the company were, C. F. Curtis, 
president; E. E. Reynolds, manager; Myron Gates, treasurer; James Peterson, 
secretary. The following year Mr. Peterson became president ; Mr. Reynolds 
secretary, and L. Lamb, vice-president. The present officers are. H. W. Sea- 
man, president; C. F. Curtis, vice-president; A. G. Smith, treasurer; F. B. 
Shaw, secretary. The present board of directors are C. F. Curtis, H. W. 
Seaman, L. Lamb, James Peterson, G. E. Lamb, C. F. Alden, A. G. Smith, 
L. E. Curtis and M. L. Christian. They are all well known business men of 
Clinton. Mr. Christian has been superintendent since September, 1907. 
Since Mr. Seaman was elected president in 1907, the company has had a re- 
markable growth, under his able management ; and a good share of the credit 
should go to Mr. Christian, who understands every detail of the work he has 
in hand and who is a very capable handler of employees. 

Mr. Christian is a Prohibitionist, and while livinsf in Ohio he was a candi- 
date on the state ticket for member of the board of public works and he ran the 
second highest, the ticket receiving some nine thousand votes. He has also 
taken considerable interest in local affairs since coming to Clinton. He is a 
member of Western Star Lodge, No. 100, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
also a member of the De Molav Consistorv. 



I 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. IO53 

On January 29, 1894, Mr. Christian was married to Mrs. Sarah J. 
(Gosney) Crawford, a native of Kentucky and the daughter. of M. F. and 
Sarah Gosney, old settlers of Kentucky and a well established and hig-hly 
esteemed family. Mrs. Christian is a lady of refinement and stands high 
socially. This union has been blessed with five children, namely: Frances, 
who is a student in the Clinton high school; Madison L., Jr., and three who 
died in infancy. 



CHARLES STIRES. 



The name of Stires is one much respected in Eden township, Clinton 
county, on account of the worth and al^ility of tho?e who have there 1:)orne it. 
Of sturdy German ancestry, the members of this familv who have made this 
country their home have been among the most intelligent, the most useful, nnd 
the most successful of the residents of their community. 

Charles Stires was born on January i, 1865, in Clinton county, the son 
of Henry and Dora Stires, natives of Germany who came to Iowa about 1855 
and in 1867 purchased the present Stires farm, then consisting of eighty acres. 
Henrv Stires accumulated money and invested it in adjoining land, until at 
his death he owned three hundred and eighty acres. He followed the active 
work of farming and stock raising until an advanced age. wlicn he purchased 
property in Clinton, where he resided for se^■eral years, and died vt the age 
of seventv-fi^■e His wife is still living in Clinton, at the age of seventy- 
seven ThcA- vere tlie parents of five children, of whom four are living, 
nimelv : Louise, now Mrs. Gerche. of Clinton; Rachel, ]\Irs. Otto, of Clinton; 
Frank, of Missouri, and Charles. A\'illiam is deceased. 

Charles Stires spent his boyhood \vith his father on the farm, received 
a common school education, and on February 7, 1894. was married to ]Mary 
Dann. the daughter of George and Sarah Dann. of this county, who emigrated 
here from Ensland in 18^5. They located first at Elvira, and bter purchasing 
a one hundred and sixty-acre farm on section 6 of Eden township adjoining 
the r'.-esent farm of Mr Stires. Her father died upon this farm at the age of 
sixtv-five and her mother is now living at Low Moor at the age of fiftv-seven. 
Mr. and Airs. Dann were the parents of eleven children, all living: Thomas, 
William, Mary (Mrs. Stires), George. Charles. Samuel, Edward, Arthur, 
Walter, Ellen (Mrs. Paulsen) and Benjamin H. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stires began married life on their present farm, where they 
have continuously lived since. In 1893 their residence was destroyed by fire, 



I054 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

with most of its contents. A modern home was then erected on the same site, 
and many other substantial improvements have been made in the premises by 
Mr. Stires, who has recently had a great deal of cement work done. The 
water is supplied for domestic use and the tanks for his stock filled by the use 
of motor power, while the churning, washing, separating of cream and grind- 
ing of feed is accomplished by the same means. Mr. Stires is a hard working 
and successful farmer, his present farm consisting of over two hundred acres; 
he is a public spirited citizen and has done much to develop the community. 
He is a Republican and he and his wife are members of the Methodist church. 
He has two children, Clara, who was born on November 20, 1891, and Ralph 
McKinley, born on May 18, 1894. Clara is now attending the Clinton gram- 
mar school. It is such sterling citizens as Mr. Stires who make Clinton a great 
county in a great state. 



ALDEN J. VAN EPPS. 

Action, subtly planned and carefully carried out, is the keynote of the 
character of all who achieve success on this planet of ours. The successful 
life story of Alden J. Van Epps, a young and progressive farmer of Camanche 
township, Clinton county, is a case in point, being one of a determined struggle 
for a definite purpose. 

Mr. Van Epps was born in this county on September 13, 1875, 'i"*^^ ^s the 
son of Lewis B. and Sarah (Grohe) Van Epps. His father was a native of 
Montgomery county, New York, born there on December i, 1850, and he 
came to Clinton county, Iowa, in 1855. when five years of age, with his par- 
ents, John V. and Catherine (Smith) Van Epps, who were among the most 
extensive land owners and prominent citizens of the early days here, John V. 
Van Epps having become the owner of fourteen Imndred and fifty acres of 
land. He was a good manager, an excellent business man and was long one 
of the leading citizens of the county. He and his wife were the parents of six 
children, namely: Charles H., Margaret, John E., Lewis B., Alden, Sr., and 
Clarence. John V. Van Epps' parents, John and Elizabeth (Veder) Van 
Epps, were natives of the state of New York and they were married in April, 
1834. The paternal great-grandparents came to America from Holland at an 
early day and settled in the state of New York, at Fultonville, occupying a part 
of the tract of land that they first located upon for many years, having received 
a patent from the English government, which consisted of eighteen hundred 
acres and which remained in the Van Epps family. 




>^- 1^ 



i 




/ 



ALDEN J. VAN EPPS AND FAMILY 



'^^J^^ NEW YORif 
^^Si-rc UBJiXRY 






CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. IO55 

The mother of Alden J. Van Epps was born in 1852 and she and Lewis B. 
Van Epps were married in CHnton county, Iowa, on November 25, 1873. 
They now Hve at Ames, Iowa, where they purchased property, having retired 
from their farm which they still own in Camanche township, this county, and 
which adjoins that of their son, Alden J., of this review. The father was a 
well known and successful farmer here and influential in the affairs of the com- 
munity. He and his wife became the parents of seven children, of whom six 
are living, namely : Alden J. ; Gertrude is the wife of E. C. Haga, of Minne- 
apolis; Maud is the wife of George Peters, of Erie, Illinois; Catherine, Leroy, 
Echwold ; Harold is deceased. 

Alden J. Van Epps, of this review, received a good common school educa- 
tion, attending school at Valparaiso, Indiana, and Dixon, Illinois. He was 
married on February 17, 1897, to Mary I. Record, daughter of A. P. and 
Hannah (Dewey) Record, of Camanche township, this county, her parents 
being among the prominent early settlers of this locality, Mr. Record having 
served throughout the Civil war. Mrs. Van Epps has a good education and 
is a lady of refinement. 

Mr. and Mrs. Van Epps began their married life on their own farm, which 
they sold one year later and purchased their present place, the homestead of his 
grandfather Veder, who was in his day a large land owner in this county, he 
having given all his children good homes. Mr. Van Epps is the owner of an 
excellent farm, comprising one-fourth section, on which he has made extensive 
improvements, the best, in fact, for he is progressive and believes in keeping 
abreast of the times in every respect. He has a substantial and attractive home, 
good outbuildings and everything about his place indicates thrift, prosperity, 
good judgment and that a gentleman of excellent taste has its management in 
hand. He is a very painstaking and industrious young farmer. He has one 
of the "show places" of the county, and it is a pleasure to look over his well- 
kept fields and neat, well arranged buildings. He is a lover of good live stock 
and a good judge of the same, and always keeps some excellent herds of vari- 
ous kinds which he feeds for the market and which, owing to their superior 
quality, find very ready and satisfactory sales. 

Politically, Mr. Van Epps is a Republican, and he is an attendant and 
liberal contributor to the Methodist Episcopal church, of which his wife is a 
member. They are the parents of one son, Lawrence, born on February 23, 
1903. 

Mr. and Mrs. Van Epps are prominent in their neighborhood and their 
pleasant home is often the gathering place for their numerous friends who 
always find here an old-fashioned hospitality. 



1056 CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 

HENRY GISE GALBRAITH. 

Although deeply interested in business affairs, Henry Gise Galbraith, one 
of Clinton county's representative citizens, has not been unmindful of his 
duties to the public, being a careful observer of the trend of events and an 
active participant in those affairs that relate to his community. A progressive 
man of affairs in all that the term implies, he is in touch with the leading 
questions and issues of the times. 

Mr. Galbraith was born in Montour county, Pennsylvania, March 25, 
1851, the son of Josiah and Mary Ann (Robison) Galbraith, both natives of 
Pennsylvania, the father of Scotch descent and the mother of Irish ancestry. 
They grew to maturity, \vere educated and married in their native state, and 
there Mr. Galbraith followed farming, for the most part, in his younger years. 
In 1854 he and his wife emigrated westward, locating in Clinton county, Iowa, 
and, being pleased with the prospect, soon bought a farm of one hundred and 
twenty acres in Lincoln township, and later bought another farm of one hun- 
dred and twenty acres. Ten years later he bought a third place, containing 
one hundred and twenty acres, adjoining the farm on which his son now lives. 
He gave his time entirely to farming and to his family. In a few years he 
sold his first one hundred and twenty acres, then bought eighty acres east of 
where his son, Henry G.. now lives. Three years later he sold this eighty. 
Then he began dealing in city property in Clinton, continuing thus from 1S88 
until his death, in 1895. He was a very successful business man and was well 
liked by all who knew him. Mrs. Josiah Galbraith is still living. Fifteen 
children were born to them, seven of "whom are living. While living in Penn- 
sylvania, the father drilled a company of light cavalry prior to the Civil war. 
It was his duty to keep a certain division of the army supplied with horses, 
which he found or purchased. He was a loyal supporter of the government. 

Henry G. Galbraith, of this review, was educated in the common schools 
and reared on the home farm and when very young he took up farming for a 
life work. In about 1885 he went to Nebraska, and bought one hundred and 
sixty-five acres, but did not live there. After keeping it about eighteen years 
he sold it and bought eighty acres, the first land his father bought in Io\va. 
He put modern improvements on the home farm, including a fine residence 
and a substantial barn. Inheriting one hundred acres, he now has a model 
farm of one hundred and eighty acres. He carries on general farming and 
stock raising and is very successful in each line of endeavor. Sometimes he 
rents his farm, all but sixty acres. 

Politically, Mr. Galbraith is a Republican. He has been school director 




MR. AND MRS. HENRY G. GALBRAITH 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLrc LIBIURY 



ASTOR, LE^OX, AUD 

TILDEN FOUNDATIONS 

R L 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. IO57 

about seven years, then moved to Clinton where he resided four years, but 
upon his return here was again elected director. He has been president of 
the board six years. 

In 1877 Mr. Galbraith was married to Libbie Kube, a native of Clinton, 
Iowa, and to this union four children were born, namely : Charles Hulen, who 
was killed in Nebraska; Bert, Gertrude and Emma. Mr. Galbraith was mar- 
ried on June 15, 1898, to Louise Hendricks, a native of Holland, and to this 
union four children have been born, Henry, Agnes, Wilhelmina and Josiah 
Robinson. 



HANS EGGERS. 



Prominent among the people of Elk River township, Clinton county, and 
a man of much influence among the German-American citizens of his com- 
munity, stands Hans Eggers, who was born in the province of Schleswig- 
Holstein, Germany, on August 7, 1843. He is the son of John and Christina 
(Hansen) Eggers, both natives of the same province of Germany, in which 
they spent their lives. They were members of the Lutheran church. Seven 
children were born to them: Christina, marri-ed John Youker; Margaret mar- 
ried John Hansen ; Wiepke also married ; Hans, Dora, Anna and Claus, who 
were also married. Of these, Hans is the only one living. 

Hans Eggers grew up in a village, learned the shoemaker's trade and 
followed it until he was twenty-six years of age, when he came to i\merica, 
landing in New York, and completing his journey to Clinton, Iowa, by rail, 
arriving there in March, 1869, with his wife and one daughter. At first he 
found such labor as he could, then removed to Jackson county, Iowa, where he 
bought a small tract of land, and built a home, continuing to live there until 
the death of his wife, on January i8, 1877. Then he sold his home and came 
to the neighborhood where he now resides, and for a time worked at his trade. 
He was again married in 1878. He is a man who takes much interest in 
public affairs, and is a Democrat in politics. Both he and his wife were reared 
in the Lutheran church, from which faith they have never departed. By his 
first marriage he became the father of one daughter, Christina, who died when 
two vears old. 

On July 2, 1878, Mr. Eggers was married to Mrs. Josephine Naeve, the 
widow of Peter Naeve, who died in April. 1877, leaving five children : ]\Iary, 
now Mrs. Peter Reptner; August, a farmer; Frank, at home, a farmer; Caro- 
line, who married J. A. Hagge; and John, a blacksmith, all of whom Mr. 



1058 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

Eggers helped to rear. Mrs. Eggers died on February 2, 1911, and is buried 
in Dierks cemetery. 

Mrs. Eggers was born in Clinton county. Tovra. on September 16, TR-^P. 
the daughter of John ?nd Mary (Horst) Reese, natives of Holstein province, 
Germany, who came to America in 1845, locating at Davenport, where Mr. 
Reese first found employment in a brick yard, shortly afterward as a farm 
hand, then bought a small farm, which he later sold and bought a large tract 
of land in Jackson county. This he improved and cultivated for some time, 
then, on account of his eyes failing so that he could not work on the farm, he 
divided it into small tracts and sold most of it, keeping a portion, on which 
he kept hired men employed, while he was engaged in the saloon business. 
Soon he sold all his land and, moving to Tama, bought an agricultural busi- 
ness, and, on age approaching, sold this and moved to Flat Rock, Iowa, where 
he lived in retirement from active life for five years. He then found a good 
home with Mr. Eggers and his wife, in whose house he died on September 15, 
1897. I^^ politics he was a Democrat, in religion a Lutheran. When he came 
to Iowa it was little settled, and he lived to see it become a great state and to 
bear his share in its development. Mr. Reese was well known and highly 
respected, his integrity and honor being above reproach. His wife survived 
him and died at the home of her daughter on March 27, 1902. She was also a 
Lutheran. Her parents had died in the old country when she was very young, 
and she was reared by strangers. 

Air. and Mrs. Reese were the parents of nine children, three of whom 
died when young. The others are John, who died when sixteen; Josephine, 
the wife of Mr. Eggers; Dora, who married Detlef Week; Mary, the wife of 
Crist Henningsen ; Henrv% who owns and cultivates the old homestead; and 
Amelia, the wife of Frank Frahm. Xo children were born to Mr. Eggers' 
second marriage. 

Mr. Eggers has many friends and is highly regarded in his community, 
of which he is a progressive and public-spirited member. 



WILLIAM RATHIE. 



From the far-awa}- brakes and braes of bonny Scotland comes William 
Rathie, an honored citizen of Maquoketa, Jackson county, Iowa, where he is 
living retired after a life of strenuous endeavor, principally in connection 
with the agricultural interests of Clinton county, and he brought with him 



PUBunnifB;.AiiY 



ASTOR, LKNOX, A^D 

TILDEN FtfUNDATIONS 

R I 




MRS. CHRISTINA RATHIE 




d- .« \i '**.!, ' 



"He 




WILLIAM RATHIE 



THE NEW YCRK 

PUBirC UBRAJY 



ASTOR, imm, AVD 

TILDEN FaUNDATIONS 

R L 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. ^059 

to our new western land all the courage, perseverance, fortitude and sterling 
integrity characteristic of the people of the land of Bruce and Burns, Wallace 
and Scott, consequtotly he has succeeded admirably well in the Hawkeye state. 

Air. Rathie was born in Roxburghshire, Scotland, January 27, 1832, and 
he is the son of George and Margaret (Hoag) Rathie, natives of Scotland, 
where the mother died when William was a boy. he being the fourth of a 
family of five childrea who were, Mrs. Jennie Rutherford, who died at 
Welton, Clinton county, leaving four children ; Mrs. Jane Tully li^■es in 
Welton, Iowa; Mrs. Isabell Robson lives in Dewitt, Iowa; William of this 
review ; and Mrs. Elizabeth Drenning, of Otter Creek, Jackson county, Iowa. 
Three of these children, Isabell, William and Elizabeth, accompanied their 
father to America in 1854 and located in Lewisville, New York, near Utica, 
where they remained until 1856. when they came to Welton, Clinton county, 
Iowa. George Rathie and his two sons-in-law bought one hundred and twenty 
acres of land near Welton, and twenty acres of timber near there later. The 
father made his home with his daughters for some time, dying about 1865. 

The subject worked out as a farm hand during his early life in Scotland, 
and during the first ten months he fpent in America he worked as a farm hand 
in New York, and he became acquainted with his wife there. 

Upon coming to Iowa, William Rathie hired out as a farm hand for 
about nine months, then went to work on his father's farm and continued to 
work on the home place until the father's death, when he came into posses- 
sion of the paternal interest in the farm. xA.bout 1867 he added one hundred 
and sixtv acres to the farm and later twenty acres, and again eighty, and 
forty acres of one of his brothers-in-law, and later another one hundred and 
sixty near his home, and another forty, making in all five hundred and forty 
acres, and he also owned twenty acres of timber land. He lived on this farm, 
successfully working the same until 1893, when he rented to his son and 
moved to Maquoketa, Jackson county, where he has since made his home, hav- 
ing erected there a modern, commodious and attractive ten-room house. He 
also owns several other residences in Maquoketa. In 1908 his son left the 
farm and moved to Stickney, South Dakota, where he lives at present. 

In 1909 William Rathie sold his farm at Welton, Clinton county, and 
bought four hundred and eighty acres near Stickney, South Dakota. He 
has been veiy successful as an agriculturist and business man, having always 
worked hard and managed well, and he is deserving of a large measure of 
the good things of life owing to the consistent course he has led and the 
honest relations he has always borne to his fellow men. Politically, he is a 
Democrat, and during his residence at Welton he was a member of the Pres- 



I060 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

byterian church, and while he never desired offices of pubHc trust or as- 
pired to be a leader of men. he was always deeply interested in public af- 
fairs rnd willing to do his part in all laudal^le movements for the good of 
his c'^mrTn'tA'. 

On February i8, 1861, Mr. Rathie married Christina Smart, who was 
born in Coldstream, Scotland, on January 27. 1834. She was the daughter of 
Thomas and Isabell Smart, natives of Scotland, each representing an ex- 
cellent old family. They came to America in 185 1 and located in Burlington 
Green, Otsego county. New York, where they spent the balance of their lives 
and where Mr. and Mrs. William Rathie were married (at her father's house) 
and then came direct to Mr. Rathie's home in Iowa. Mrs. Rathie's death oc- 
curred on February 3, 1905. She had been totally blind for two years. 
She was a woman of many estimable traits of character and greatly admired 
bv a wide circle of friends. 

Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Rathie, one of whom died in 
infancy; the two living are, Isabell, born May 19, 1863, is the wife of F. W. 
\\"ray ; they live in Maquoketa, Iowa, and are the parents of three children, 
Beula, Delia and Mildred. Thomas Rathie was born August 14, 1864; in 
1893 he married Carrie Knight, and they lived on his father's farm until 
1909. In 1908 he purchased' one hundred and sixty acres near Stickney, 
South Dakota, and after moving to that place he continued to add to the 
same until he at present owns a very valuable tract of five hundred acres. 
Thev have no children. 



WILLIAM THOMAS JOYCE. 

In the untimely death of William Thomas Joyce, of Chicago, whose 
demise occurred March 4, 1909, the industrial world lost one of its most 
progressive and successful workers. Trained in the lumber business, he rose 
to a position of importance, and the many interests with which he was identi- 
fied throughout the Northwest are monuments to his ability and prodigious 
energy. He will be sadly missed in the lumber trade, in which he was long 
a powerful and influential factor. 

Mr. Joyce w^as born at Salisbury, Connecticut, Januaiy 2, i860, the son 
of David and Elizabeth F. (Thomas) Joyce. The familv moved to Lyons, 
Iowa, now a part of Clinton, where the son was reared. He attended the 
Lyons schools, later taking a course at the Shuttuck school, at Faribault, 
Minnesota, finishing with an academic training in Chicago. The elder Joyce 



-'^E NEW 



^i^^iwimi'i 







"Westerii Bank Nate and Engra'^ing Com--paiw. Ch-Lcagn. 




^^ 




^^^ 




ET:g%WT.Bal3iei:lC 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. I061 

was one of the pioneer lumbemien of the Middle West. He carried on a large 
and lucrative business, and his efforts had much to do with the early develop- 
ment of the trade. Broad and liberal minded, he enjoyed a popularity so 
great that he was elected mayor of Lyons without a dissenting vote. He gave 
liberally to charity and was ready at all times to support any movement tend- 
ing toward the betterment of the public good. 

The senior Mr. Joyce directed the education of his son with a view of 
having him engage in the lumber business, so when he left school in 1880, 
William T. began to work for his father. His training was thorough, as he 
studied every department of the trade. He clerked in the mill office, worked 
in the woods, mastered the details of the retail lumber yards, and was then sent 
on the road as a salesman. His father, no doubt, intended the son to succeed 
him in business, and when the elder Joyce passed away the young man was 
well equipped to assume complete control of his parent's vast interests. Be- 
fore the death of his father, whose demise occurred December 4, 1894, Wil- 
liam T. Joyce had practically assumed control of affairs. The various inter- 
ests were located in different parts of the country, and the immense business 
built up by the father was perpetuated by the son. 

The subject not only kept the numerous enterprises intact, but extended 
and increased them. At the time of his death he was president of four rail- 
roads : The Manistee & Grand Rapids Railway Company, the Minneapolis & 
Rainy River Railway Company, the Tremont & Gulf Railway Company and 
the Groveton, Lufkin & Northern Railway Company. Of his many lumber 
interests, Mr. Joyce was president of the following Southern companies: 
Southern Investment Company, Tremont Lumber Company. Winn Parish 
Lumber Company and the Louisiana Lumber Company, Ltd.. all operating 
in Louisiana, and the Trinity County Lumber Company, operating in Texas. 
In the North, he was president of the Northern Investment Company, the 
Itasca Lumber Company, the Deer River Lumber Company, the William T. 
Joyce Company, The W. T. Joyce Company, which operates twenty-nine line 
yards ; the Joyce-W'atkins Company, doing a lumber, telephone and telegraph 
pole business, and the Joyce Lumber Company of Clinton, Iowa, engaged in 
the wholesale business. He was also president of the Garland Hotel Com- 
pany, which owns and operates the Park Hotel, at Hot Springs, Arkansas. 
In addition to these concerns, he was interested in the Victoria Lumber & 
Manufacturing Company, of Victoria, British Columbia; the Mississippi River 
Logging Company ; the St. Paul Boom Company, and was a stockholder in the 
Corn Exchange National Bank and the Illinois Trust & Savings Bank, of Chi- 
cago, and the Interstate Trust & Banking Company, of New Orleans, and in a 



I062 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

number of other prominent institutions. Mr. Joyce controlled yellow pine 
mills, the combined yearly output of which was one hundred and fifty million 
feet. The timber back of the Trinity County Lumber Company's mill alone 
amounts to over five hundred million feet, and other tracts acquired froiti 
time to time give these concerns the assurance of long life in the trade. 

Mr. Joyce established general headquarters for his vast and rapidly in- 
creasing interests in Chicago in 1897, and since that time he was a conspicuous 
figure in lumber and financial afifairs of the city. 

Mr. Joyce was married, in 1884, to Clotilde Gage, of a prominent Lyons 
family, who, with their two sons, David Gage and James Stanley, survive him. 
The eldest son, David Gage Joyce, was associated in business with his father 
some time before the latter's death. He and his brother, James Stanley, a 
graduate of Yale Laiiversity, are the successors to the Joyce interests. These 
young men, only twenty-five and twenty- four years of age respectively, have 
talent and ambition and the future holds forth much promise to them. 

Mr. Joyce was a member of the Chicago Union League, Chicago Ath- 
letic, Chicago Yacht and the Midlothian Country Clubs. He was also a 
thirty-second-degree Mason and a member of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. 

Home life always appealed strongly to Mr. Joyce and his domestic rela- 
tions were of the happiest. His private office was adorned with portraits of 
his family, of his homes, which included the old family residence at Chapin- 
ville, Connecticut, a roomy New England mansion, and the Joyce residence at 
Lyons, Iowa, as well as the handsome Chicago home situated at No. 4614 
Woodlawn avenue, in the exclusive Kenwood district, where the surviving 
members of his family now reside. While vast interests required much of his 
attention. Mr. Joyce found time occasionally for relaxation and he sought 
recreation in foreign travel. 

Mr. Joyce inherited a large fortune and he could have lived in luxury, but 
he was a man of ambition and devoted the best efforts of his life to the develop- 
ment of the country's resources. The business interests left to him were in 
good hands and under his careful management their value was greatly in- 
creased. For his children he had a great and lasting affection and one of his 
fondest desires was to give them the best preparation for life. Their educa- 
tion was wisely planned and it is believed that these young men can success- 
fully direct and develop the many interests that came to him at the death of 
their grandfather. 

Mr. Joyce was a man of great executive ability. He gathered about him 
lieutenants skilled in the management and direction of the Joyce interests. 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. IO63 

Mr. Joyce was of a retiring disposition and while his donations to charity were 
large and frequent, he studiously avoided any publicity pertaining to them. 
To Cornell College he gave liberally, one of his gifts being a fifty-thousand- 
dollar endowment for the chair of economics and sociology. Loyalty was 
characteristic of the man. It was shown in his interest in Clinton, where his 
father was so long in business, by his appreciation of the state of Iowa, where 
he spent so much of his life, and by his liberal support of the fraternal 
organizations to which he belonged. He expressed his regard for his parents 
by the erection of a mortuary chapel and an imposing obelisk to their memory. 
The ties of home and family were ever dear to him. A beautiful sentiment 
was manifested by keeping in his possession the home in the East, where he 
was born, and also the home in Clinton. This great, generous-hearted man 
did not live for himself alone, and while many of his kind deeds will have no 
public record, his larger benevolences cannot be concealed. 



ALFRED L. COOK. 



Distinctivelv one of the leadins^ business men of Clinton countv and 



'f-1 



honored with a position of responsibility and trust, the subject of this sketch 
fills a large place in the public eye and it is with no little satisfaction that the 
following brief review of his life and tribute to his worth is accorded a place 
in this volume. A. L. Cook, son of E. L. and Ruby (Chaffee) Cook, a 
notice of whom appears elsewhere in this chapter, is a native of Clinton 
county, Iowa, and dates his birth from June 17, 1873. -^* ^^^ proper age he 
entered the district schools of his township and in due time completed the 
prescribed course of study, this training being afterwards supplemented by 
two years in Cornell University and a full course in the Davenport Commer- 
cial College, where he fitted himself for his subsequent career as a business 
man. On quitting the latter institution, he turned his attention to educational 
work and during the four or five years ensuing taught in the public schools 
of the county, after which he was associated for a short time with D. W. 
Hurst in banking at Delmar. In 1900 he accepted the position of cashier 
in the First National Bank of Lost Nation, which was established that year 
and in the organization of which he took a leading part. He is still identi- 
fied with the institution in the capacity indicated and in the discharge of his 
official functions demonstrates business ability of a high order and a faith- 
fulness to the interests of the bank which has not only gained the confidence 
of the officers and stockholders, but of the general public as well. 



1064 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

Mr. Cook assumed his present important trust well qualified for its duties 
and responsibilities and thus far his career has been eminently creditable to 
himself and satisfactory to all concerned. An accomplished business man, 
familar with every phase of banking, he is unremitting in his efforts to pro- 
mote the interests of the institution with which connected and make it serve 
its intended purpose, in addition to which he has broad and comprehensive 
views of financial matters and a knowledge of business conditions which is 
greatly appreciated by many of his fellow citizens who consult him as an 
authority upon such matters and repose implicit confidence in his opinions and 
judgment. Though primarily interested in the business to which his talents 
are being devoted, Mr. Cook is not unmindful of his indebtedness to the com- 
munity, being ready at all times to lend his aid and influence to the furthering 
of worthy enterprises, and losing no opportunity in his efforts to promote the 
general welfare of his fellow men. He gives his support to the Republican 
party and though not a politician in the ordinary meaning of the term, he 
manifests a lively interest in political matters and at intervals has been elected 
to various local offices, having served as assessor of his city and township and 
being clerk of the former at the present time. 

Mr. Cook is a member of Harbor Lodge No. 556, Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, and while not identified with any religious body, he is a regu- 
lar attendant of the Episcopal church. All laudable means for the 
alleviation of human suffering and distress enlist his sympathy and assistance, 
and he donates freely to every measure having for its object the moral ad- 
vancement of his kind. 

Mr. Cook, on December 29, 1908, was happily married to Camilla 
Stephens, the accomplished daughter of William Stephens, of Maquoketa, 
the union being without issue. Mrs. Cook is a member of the Episcopal 
church, zealous in the good work of the organization, and her influence 
for good is felt among those \vith whom she mingles. Cultured 
and refined and of beautiful life and character, she moves in the best social 
circles of the community and is highly esteemed by all who enjoy the privi- 
lege of her acquaintance. 



AMHERST \V. RUSSELL. 

Among the prominent and respected citizens of Camanche township 
stands the gentleman whose name heads this article. Amherst W. Russell 
was born in Clinton county. New York, December 12, 1832, the son of Nemier 







FRIEND E. RUSSELL 



THE NEW YORK 
PlIBLrc II13UARY 



AS"0-\ LF^^OX, AST) 

TILDEN l-aUNDATlONB 

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CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. I065 

and Mary Ann (Lambson) Russell, natives of Vermont. His parents came to 
this county about 1842 and located in Camanche township, where his father 
('ied ten }ears later and his wife a few years later. They are buried in Shafton 
cemetery. His grandfather Lambson was a Revolutionary soldier. Xemicr 
and Alary Ann Russell were the parents of nine chikh'en. of whom but two 
survive. Adna E. Russell, now eighty-two, is a resident of California, yet 
a man of such vigor that he recently came unattended on a visit to his brother, 
Amherst. 

Amherst \A'. Russell is one of the very few living territorial settlers of 
Clinton county. He received but a limited education in his boyhood days, 
and was married on July 14, 1859, to Ann M. Willett. daughter of Court V. 
and Hannah Willett. natives of New York, of Irish and Scotch descent. 
Mr. and Mrs. Willett came to Iowa in 1855, and located in Eden township, 
this county, where Mr. Willett was a farmer. Their entire family consists of 
five children, of whom Mrs. Russell is the third child. Her father died when 
sixty-eight, her mother at the age of eighty-six. 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell began their married life on rented land and in 
1888 purchased their present home farm of tw^o hundred eleven acres in sec- 
tions 10 and 15, Eden and Camanche townships. Here they have lived con- 
tinually since and added to their original purchase one hundred sixty acres, 
adjoining them, but sold it to their son Friend. Mr. Russell is a member of the 
Masonic order, and in politics is a Republican. He has been a very success- 
ful farmer and owns one of the best cultivated farms in the township. He 
is well known and stands high in the regard and respect of the citizens of his 
community. 

Mr. and ]Mrs. Russell are the parents of one son. Friend E.. and one 
daughter. Mar)' T., who was married to Walter !M. Dannatt, a resident of 
Low Moor, Iowa. 

Friend E. Russell was- born October 25, 1867. and died April 2T,, 1909. 
He was married in November, 1893, to R. May Bander, daughter of Samuel 
C. and Maiy E. Bander, of this county, who, having retired from farming, 
are now li^•ing• at Low Moor. Mr. Bander served as first mayor of Low- Moor 
and served his township as trustee for several years. Friend E. Russell was a 
man of many splendid qualities, which had gained friends for him where\-er 
known. He was an energetic and successful farmer and a devoted husband 
and loving father. He was taken just in the prime of a life of seeming great 
promise; but such are the ways of Providence. 

Mrs. R. May Russell resides on her farm of two hundred and forty acres, 
having her residence just opposite that of Father and Mother Russell, and 



I066 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

' " i 

lives with her two attractive children, Marion, born August 2, 1895, and 
Irma I , born January 31, 1898. She is a woman of much ability and many 
accomplishments. She has kept a diary continuously since 1888, a remarkable 
record, comprising four large books kept in a neat manner and being a valuable 
record of the period covered by it. nearly a quarter of a century. 



JAMES J. OGDEN. 

The Ogden family is deserving of conspicuous mention in a history of 
Clinton county for many reasons which will be apparent by a perusal of the 
following paragraphs, and one of the best known and most influential of those 
of the present generation bearing this name is James J. Ogden, of Maquoketa, 
Jackson county, Iowa, whose interests in Clinton county have long been ex- 
tensive and who has been here practically all his life, where he spent his very 
active years in connection with agricultural pursuits, but is now retired. He 
was born in Clermont county, Ohio, May i, 1828, of a sterling Buckeye an- 
cestry, being the son of James S. and Mary (Riley) Ogden, the father born 
in Virginia in 1795, and the mother in Marvdand on February 11, 1804. They 
moved to Ohio with their parents and were married there. After their mar- 
riage Mr. Ogden worked as teamster for a large distillery in Neville, Clermont 
county, Ohio. In i'844 the family came to Iowa, driving overland to Daven- 
port and from there north to what is now Maquoketa, Jackson county. They 
remained here for a year or more. In 1848 they entered eighty acres of land 
in section 18. Bloomfield township, Clinton county. He built a two-room 
frame house and began the cultivation of the soil, and here the elder Ogden 
made his home until his death. He and his wnfe were members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. His death occurred in 1854, having been pre- 
ceded to the grave by his wife in 1852. They were the parents of twelve 
children, all of whom grew to manhood and womanhood but two, who died in 
infancy; they were: William V., born in 1818 and died when twenty-one 
years of age; Mrs. Elizabeth Goodeno'w, who reached the age of eighty years, 
dying on April 14, 1900; Thomas V., born January 15, 1821, died April 7, 
1900; Mrs. Delily T. Parker, born November 4, 1823, resided in Maquoketa, 
Iowa, and died December 24, 1910; James J., of this review; Benjamin F., 
born February 10, 1830, lives on the old homestead in Bloomfield townshij), 
this county; he is a twin, the other child dying in infancy; Mrs. Elender M. 
James, born April 24, 1832, died in 1907; Mrs. Sarah Ann Nodle, born March 



r\\v 



YORK 



Till' '"'" -; y 




MRS. MARGARET OGDEN 




JAMES J. OGDEN 



THE l^T^.W ^'ORK 






CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. T067 

17, 1834, (lied February 27, 1908; Joshua B., bom June 3. 1837. lives in 
Oklahoma; Mary Jane, born in 1841, died in 1861. ,-; ; : 

When the parents of these children came to Iowa the country was the 
home of large numbers of Indians, although they were friendly, but were a 
nuisance on account of their propensity to beg and steal. There was an 
abundance of wild game, deer, turkeys, wolves, etc., and one panther was 
killed after they moved here. 

James J. Ogden of this review made his home with his parents until his 
mother's death. The following year he married and worked on a farm of 
eighty acres in section 18, Bloomfield township, adjoining his father's farm, 
which he had purchased previous to his marriage. To this eighty acres he 
added one hundred and ten acres and erected modern buildings. About 1865 
he bought one hundred and sixty acres in Brookfield township, to which he 
added eighty acres later. About 1879 he bought ninety-four acres in section 
6, Bloomfield township (a part of the John Riggs farm). He added to this at 
various times until he owned two hundred and four acres, after which he built 
new barns, houses, fences and other improvements. He owns this entire 
amount of land at present, in all six hundred and fOrty-four acres. It is all 
well improved and as good farming land as the eastern part of the state can 
boast. In 1892 Mr. Ogden retired from active farm life and moved to 
Maquoketa, Jackson county, where he rented property the first year, then 
bought a house and lots on the corner of Pleasant and Austin avenues, where, 
a few years later, he built a fine modern residence, beautiful from an archi- 
tectural viewpoint and neatly kept, which is his home at present. He has been 
unusually successful in business and was regarded as one of the leading farm- 
ers of the county for several decades. 

Politically, Mr. Ogden is a Republican, but he has never held anything 
more than minor township offices. He and his wife are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 

On September 22, 1853, Mr. Ogden was married to Margaret Sadler, 
who was born in Summit county, Ohio, October 20, 1835, the daughter of 
John and Dorothy (O'Brien) Sadler, the former born in Ireland in 1788. 
and her birth occurred in Summit county, Ohio, of Irish parentage, on Janu- 
ary 2, 1809. Mr. Sadler was twice married. His first wife he married in 
Ireland and by her they had three children, James, born in 1821, William, born 
in 1825, and Elizabeth, born in 1826. The mother of these children died in 
June, 1827. Mr. Sadler came to America about 1822 and located in Penn- 
sylvania and he worked at the cooper's trade, which he had learned in Ireland. 
About 1827 he went to Summit county and continued at his trade a few years. 



I068 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

then engaged in farming. On June i6, 1828, Mr. and Mrs. Sadler were 
married and they hved on their farm in Ohio until his death, September 22, 
1849. being survived by a widow and seven children, named as follows: 
Robert, born August 5, r829. died in Montgomery county, Iowa, March 11, 
1888; Joseph, born September 2j, 183 1, died May 15, 1907; George, born 
July 7, 1833, died in Ohio, July 22, 1846; Margaret, wife of James J. Ogden, 
of this review, born in Ohio. October 20, 1835; Mrs. Nancy Roush, born in 
1837, lives at Maquoketa. Iowa; John M.. born November 28, 1842. lived in 
Montgomery county, Iowa, and died November 24, 1910; Albert H., born 
Januaiy 7, 1848, died July 3, 1909. 

In 1852 Mrs. Sadler and her children came to Iowa and located on a 
farm north of Maquoketa in Jackson county, later moved to Clinton county 
and from there to Montgomery county, where she died November 9, 1887. 
Mr. and Mrs. Sadler and children were members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

Mr. and ]Mrs. James J. Ogden are the parents of five children, of whom 
two died in infancy; the others are, Etta M.. born December 14, 1858, and in 
1879 she married John A. Bolton, and they made their home in Maquoketa. 
Iowa, Mrs. Bolton's death occurring on December 23, 1907, leaving a hus- 
band, who now lives in California, and two children, Arthur J. and Earl V. 
The former was born x\pril 21, 1881, and was married September 11, 1898, 
to Clara Lewis, who was born on a farm in Minnesota, May 14, 1883; they 
now live in Montana and are the parents of four children: Roy B., born in 
1902; Bernice, born in 1903 ; Ray, born in August, 1905 ; Blanche M.. born in 
1906; this family resides in Monmouth township. Jackson county, Iowa. 
Earl V. Bolton was bom at Grundy Center, Grundy county, Iowa, August 
21, 1884, married in January. 1907, to Edna McDale, who was born in 1885. 
and they are the parents of one child, Edith, who was born in November, 
1907; they live in Madison. California. 

Jessie J. Ogden was born December 19. 1861. and on Eebruary 21, 1881, 
she married John E. Phillips, and lived on a farm in Bloomfield township, 
Clinton county, until 1903. when they moved to Maquoketa; they are the par- 
ents of one son. Howard Phillips, a professor in the Agricultural College at 
Davis. California. He is a graduate of the Agricultural College at Ames, 
Iowa, and was born on October 31. 1886. 

Walter W. Ogden was born May 28. 1867. on a farm in Bloomfield town- 
ship. He was educated in the public schools of his native township, and the 
Duncan Business College at Davenport. Iowa, and he learned the watch- 
maker's trade at Elgin, Illinois. He conducted a jewelry store at Eairfield. 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. I069 

Nebraska, for two years, selling out in 1895. He married Fannie B. Bowman, 
who was born in Jackson county, Iowa, on December 28, 1846, the daughter 
of Jacob and Sophrona (Blaine) Bowman. They went to live on his father's 
farm in section 6, Bloomfield township, and he is now the owner of a two 
hundred and forty-acre farm in this township. They are the parents of two 
children, Neta May, born May 21, 1898, and Ralph Sadler, born Septeml3er 
5.. 1899- 



HERMAN SCHEPERS. 

The gentleman whose name introduces this sketch is a native of Iowa and 
a son of William and Christena Schepers, of whom mention is made elsewhere 
in these pages. He was born in the city of Davenport, October 20, 1862, 
and at the early age of eight years was thrown upon his own resources, from 
which time until his young manhood he supported himself by various kinds 
of manual labor, the meanwhile, as opportunities afforded, attending the pub- 
lic schools a few months during the winter seasons. His early experience 
while working for his board and meeting the cold frowns of an uncharitable 
world, was by no means agreeable, but being naturally of an optimistic nature 
and inclined to look on the bright side of circumstances, he resolutely faced 
the future, determined to rise above the many discouragements of his sur- 
roundings. Blessed with health and strength, he addressed himself indus- 
triously to his various duties, won the confidence of his employers and in due 
time rose superior to his environments. Having been reared in the country 
from childhood and accustomed to farm labor, he soon became a very pro- 
ficient hand, so that there was always a demand for his services. 

Without narrating in detail the early experiences of young Schepers, 
suffice it to say that when a young man he turned his attention to agricultural 
pursuits as a life work and, bending all of his energies in the way of making 
it a success, his advancement from the time he began tilling the soil upon his 
own responsibility, was rapid and continuous. In the year 1889 ^i^ found 
himself the possessor of sufficient means to buy a farm or tract of land and, 
addressing himself to its cultivation and improvement, he was soon able to 
make an additional purchase. From time to time he has made judicious ii.- 
vestments in real estate until he now owns a fine farm of three hundred and 
twenty acres in Brookfield township, his place being in a high state of cultiva- 
tion and containing substantial improvements, among which is the splendid and 
imposing modern residence which he and his family now occupy. 



1070 ■ CLINTON. COUNTY, IOWA. 

Mr. Schepers is a model farmer and his financial success has kept pace 
with the industry and energy displayed in his labors and the able manner in 
which he has managed his various interests. He devotes a great deal of at- 
tention to live stock, breeding and raising high grades of cattle and hogs, 
which he sells at the highest market prices, and which, with the other products 
of his farm, yields him the liberal income which adds every year to the com- 
fortable fortune which he has already accumulated. A Democrat and well 
grounded in the principles of his party, he has little taste for politics and has 
persistently refused office, although by nature and training well qualified to 
fill any local trust within the gift of the people of his county. He is keenly 
alive to the advancement of the community, encourages all enterprises for the 
general welfare and with the good of his fellow men at heart, omits no oppor- 
tunity to promote their interests. 

Mr. Schepers, on the loth day of March, 1885, was united in marriage 
with Emma Rutenbeck, a native of Germany, the union being blessed with 
four children : Fritz, who married Grace Randall and lives in Brookfield 
township; William, deceased; Clara and Harry, who are with their parents. 
In every sense, Mr. Schepers is entitled to the honorable distinction of being 
called a self-made man. Starting without education or money, he has, by 
hard labor and unflinching self-denial, achieved signal success in a financial 
way and risen to an honorable place among the notable men of his day and 
generation in the county in which he chooses to reside. 

Mrs. Schepers is the daughter of Fred and Laura (Limpa) Rutenbeck, 
both of whom were raised in Germany. They came to this country about 
1866 and went direct to Clinton county, Iowa, and started farming. They 
had eleven children, four girls and seven boys, of whom two died when young. 
The rest all live in this county. The mother, who died in 1896, was a good 
woman and greatly beloved by all who knew her. She was buried at Lost 
Nation, Iowa. The father died in Germany, January 25, 1904, while there 
on a visit to see his old friends. He took sick suddenly, died and was buried 
at Barmon, Germany. 



CASIN BOYCE OBERT. 

This biographical memoir has to do with a character of unusual force 
and eminence, Casin Boyce Obert, whose life chapter has been closed by the 
fate that awaits us all and who was for many years one of the prominent citi- 
zens of Clinton, Iowa. During his residence here he assisted in every way 




C . NT . O B E R -r 



Tlir. NEY/ YORK 

PUBirc LIBIURY 



ASTOR, I.RNOX, AVP 

TILDEN FaUNDATIONS 

R L 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. IO7I 

possible in promoting the interests of the city and community. While he 
carried on a special line of business in such a manner as to gain a comfortable 
competence for himself, he also belonged to that class of representative citi- 
zens who promote the public welfare while advancing individual success. 
There were in hini sterling traits which commanded uniform confidence and 
regard, and his memory is today honored by all who knew him and is en- 
shrined in the hearts of his many friends. 

Mr. Obert was born in Watkins, Schuyler county. New York, the son of 
Peter and Maria (Cross) Obert, natives of New York and Pennsylvania, 
Casin B. first seeing the light of day on January 25, 1847. He grew to ma- 
turity in his native community and received a good education in the local 
schools, which was supplemented in later life by general home reading and 
study until he was aptly conversant with current topics of the times as well 
as familiar with the world's best literature. When a young man he went to 
Bath, New York, and entered the mercantile house of A. S. Howell & Com- 
pany; later he entered into partnership with Edwin L. Church at Bath, en- 
gaging in the dry goods business, in w^hich he-was successful and he remained 
there until 1892, becoming one of the well known merchants of the place. 
Believing that Clinton, Iowa, was a better and larger field for his operations, 
he came here in 1892 to enter the Towle & Spreter Company, a corporation 
conducting a large department store, and he proved to be a very valuable, in 
fact, indispensable, acquisition to the firm from the first, and before the end 
of the year he had been elected treasurer of the company. This office he held 
with credit to himself and satisfaction to all concerned until the death of P. S. 
Towle in 1898, when he was elected president, which office he held in a manner 
that stamped him as a business man of modern ideas, rare acumen and keen 
discernment, until he was called to a higher plane of action in the mystic land, 
his death occurring on December 22, 1905. During that time he was the 
principal motive power that resulted- in building up a very lucrative and ex- 
tensive business, which was conducted in such a straightforward and honest 
manner as to give his firm a prestige in the world of industiy second to none. 
He believed in placing and maintaining every department under a perfect 
system, and in doing well what was worth doing at all. 

Mr. Obert was a vestryman in the St. John's Episcopal church for many 
years, being a liberal supporter of the same and ever vigilant of its welfare. 
He stood high in fraternal circles, having been a member of Clinton Lodge, 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Wapsipinicon Club, the Clinton 
Commercial Club, the Clinton Golf Club, and Loyal Lodge No. 237, Ancient 
Order of United Workmen, of Clinton, and also the Steuben Society of New 



1072 " CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

York and the Society of the Genesee of New York. In all of these he was 
greatly interested and held in high esteem by the members of each. 

The domestic life of Mr. Obert began on June 9, I'SSo, when he was 
united in marriage with Anna P. Lyon, daughter of the late Robert M. Lyon, 
a prominent citizen of Bath, New York, and Rebecca Brother, also of Bath. 
He is survived by the widow and one child. Louise Lyon Obert, who reside 
in their home at No. 319 Fifth avenue. 



CHARLES H. BAUER. 

Among the well known and highly respected farmers of Center town- 
ship. Clinton county, who have attained a definite degree of success in their 
line and who, at the same time, have greatly benefited the community in which 
they live, is the gentleman to whose career we now direct the reader's atten- 
tion. 

Charles H. Bauer was born July 13. 1868, in Holstein, Germany, but the 
major part of his life has been spent in the United States. Here he has 
labored in a manner that has brought him large financial rewards. He grew 
to maturity in his native community and w^as educated there. Having heard 
of the advantages of this country, he set sail for our shores in 1886. accom- 
panying his parents, August and Louise Bauer. They located in Chicago, 
where they remained one year, then moved to Clinton county, Iowa, and 
settled in Clinton, where the parents now reside, the father being sixty- 
eight years old and the mother seventy-two. They are members of the 
Lutheran church and are a fine old couple whom everybody respects. Their 
family consists of seven children, all of whom are living, namely : Henry, 
Mary Poltz, Margarethe, Christina Scheck, Augusta Krauker. Johanna Han- 
sen and Charles H. of this review. 

In his boyhood days Charles H. Bauer remained under the parental 
roof. He was married on December 28, 1872, to Louise Schroeder. a daugh- 
ter of Frederic and Margaret Schroeder, of Clinton county, but who were 
.latives of Germany, having emigrated to America in 184.7. They landed at 
New Orleans where they located, but later moved to Scott county, Iowa, locat- 
ing near Davenport, then they moved to Clinton county and settled in section 
36, where Mr. Schroeder died on October 14, 1910. his wife having died on 
Mav I. 1898, and they are buried in the cemetery at Elvira. Eight children 
were born to this family, all lix'ing. namely: Henry S., Harmon S., Dora 



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CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 1 073 

Grimm, Emma Grimm, Carolina Petersen, Mattie Hass. Mollie, who lives at 
the old home, and Louise, who married Mr. Bauer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bauer began their married life on her father's homestead 
of one hundred and sixty-five acres, which, with the exception of five acres, 
thev purchased, the five acres being the ground around the home dwelling 
whicli the father and his daughter retained as a home. Mr. and Mrs. Bauer 
have made extensive improvements on their place and it is now one of the best 
ke]Jt and most desirable farms in the township. Besides general farming, 
stock raising is carried on extensively, Mr. Bauer keeping an excellent grade 
of live stock at all times, feeding a great deal for the market. He is neat and 
exact in all details of his farm work. He has a beautiful and neatly furnished 
home and good outbuildings. 

Mr. Bauer is a man of much public enterprise. Politically he is a Demo- 
crat, but he has never aspired to offices of public trust. He and his wife are 
members of the Lutheran church. They are the parents of two children, a 
son and a daughter, Mollie, who was born March 24, 1896, is attending the 
common schools and receiving special instruction at home in music; Leroy, 
born May 12, 1907. 



JOHN HENRY CREGER. 

A native of Clinton county, Iowa, and one of the leading farmers of 
Brookfield township, the subject of this sketch was born near where he now 
lives, on the 4th day of September, 1863. His father. William Fredrick Cre- 
ger, a native of Germany, came to America when about twelve years old and 
grew to maturity in Canada. He married, in the latter country, Elizabeth 
Sherk, and soon afterwards came to Clinton county, Iowa, where he rented 
land for a few years, later purchasing forty acres in Brookfield township, 
which he subsequently enlarged by a sixty-acre tract adjoining. Still later he 
bought other land until his farm was increased to one hundred and sixtv acres, 
on which he made many good improvements and on which he continued to 
reside until 1885. His death occurred in July, 1892, his wife surviving 
him three years. 

John Henry Creger was reared amid the active duties of the farm, and 
received his education in the rural schools of Brookfield township. He as- 
sisted his father on the home place until he was married, when he rented his 
father's farm for four years. He then purchased one hundred acres a short 
distance west of Elwood and began farming upon his own responsibility. 
(68) 



1074 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

Since then his career has been eminently satisfactory, having bought addi- 
tional land the meanwhile, which he afterwards sold, his home at this time 
consisting of his original purchase, which he has made one of the finest and 
among the most valuable farms in the township. Believing in beautifying 
his home and rendering it attractive, he has not been sparing of his means 
to this end, among his improvements being a fine cement house, which, with 
its full complement of modern conveniences and comforts, leaves little to 
be desired in the way of a dwelling. His barns, outbuildings and other im- 
provements are first-class and up-to-date, and every feature of the farm be- 
speaks the presence of an enterprising, broad-minded American agriculturist, 
who takes pride in his work and believes in the dignity of his calhng. 

In connection with general farming, Mr. Creger raises considerable live 
stock. His life has been quiet and marked with great success, though he has 
never been one to boast of his achievements or parade his virtues before the 
public, being content with his lot as a prosperous tiller of the soil and with 
his high standing as a neighbor and citizen. Like all progressive men, lie 
manifests a lively interest in politics, and for a number of years has been one 
of the influential Democrats of his township, though not an office seeker: 
nevertheless he has been honored with important public trusts from time to 
time, the last being that of school director, in which he rendered very efficient 
service. He holds membership with Lost Nation Lodge No. 6i8, Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows, the principles of which splendid fraternity he en- 
deavors to put into practice in all of his relations with his fellowmen. 

On the 1 2th day of December, 1888, Mr. Creger and Anna Herkelmann, 
of Clinton county, were united in the holy bonds of matrimony, the marriage 
resulting in the birth of five children : Mary Esther, who was graduated in 1908 
from the Our Lady of Angels Seminary, at Lyons, this state, and for the 
past two years has l:een a teacher in the public schools ; Florence x\gnes is 
taking an academic course in the same institution and will graduate in June, 
1911 ; Virrum, the next in order of birth, is deceased ; Almond and Paul Henry 
are still with their parents and pupils of the district school of Brookfield town- 
ship, not far from their home. 



BENJAMIN H. SCHROEDER. 

This review records the deeds of a citizen of the sturdy German blood 
who has lived a satisfactory and profitable life, both to himself and to the 
community of which he is a part, and the story of whose doings is at once 



THE NEW ^^ORK 

PUBLITC LIBIURY 



ASTOR, L!:^OX, AifD . 
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS I i» 
E L 



\ 




MRS. CHRISTINA SCHROEDER 




BENJAMIN H. SCHROEDER 



THE NEW YORK 
PUCirc LIBRARY 



ASTOH, LENOX, AND 

TILDEN FaUNDATIONS 

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CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. '1075 

interesting and instructive, as is always the story of the hfe of a good and 
honorable man. 

Benjamin H. Schroeder was born on December ii, 1864, in Clinton 
county. Iowa, the son of Henry and Anna (Christiansen) Schroeder, who 
were natives of Germany. Henry Schroeder was born on January 28, 1830, 
and came to America in 1850. locating first at Chicago, and then removing to 
D.iven :ort. Iowa, and later to Clinton county, where he purchased, after two 
years' residence, forty acres of land. To this he added until he owned one 
hrndred and sixty rcres. and spent his active life in farming and stock raising, 
living on the farm until 1902, when he moved to Lyons and purchased a resi- 
c'cncQ. F^crc hi.^ wife, v, ho was l)orn on June 9, 1840, died on July 3, 1904. 
After her death Mr. Schroeder sold his house, and now resides with his daugh- 
ter. Airs. Schoening, of this county. He is a Democrat in politics, and in 
religion adheres to the Lutheran faith. Of his ten children, six are living: 
Benjamin H., Martin, Joseph A., Mrs. Ziena Peters, Mrs. Bertha Schoening. 
and Mrs. Anna Anderson. The deceased are Emma. August, Nicholas and 
Margaret. Mr. Schroeder was in the great cyclone of i860 which passed 
through this county, but escaped unharmed. 

Benjamin H. Schroeder received a common school education, and re- 
mained with his father on the farm until of age. He then worked out for 
himself for four years, and at the age of twenty-five was married to Christina, 
the daughter of Alartin and Margaret (Boyson) Johansen, who were natives 
of Germany. Her mother is deceased, and her father is still living in his 
native land, and at present Mrs. Schroeder is visiting her father and her native 
home. Mr. and Mrs. Schroeder began their married life on rented land for 
two years, then they moved to the farm on which they are now living, the 
homestead which his mother's father had bought, and which Mr. Schroeder 
purchased from his mother. The dwelling is a well preserved and comfort- 
able old house, built by Grandfather Christiansen. Mr. Schroeder is a well- 
to-do farmer, has his place in a high state of cultivation, and keeps a good 
grade of stock and feeds for the market. He is well informed and public 
spirited. In politics he is a Democrat, and in religion a member of the 
Lutheran church. Eight children were born in his family, of wdiom seven are 
living. They reside at home, attended the common schools, are cultured, have 
music in their home, and enjoy the best of society, representing as they do 
one of the pioneer families of the county. Those living are: Siadonia M., 
born on March 5. 1890; C. H. Arthur, October 2^, 1892; Anna A., October 
17, 1894; Meta v., December 26, 1896; Lillie A. C, January 23, 1898; 
Amanda J., July 29, 1901 ; and Alva M., December 12, 1907. Malinda A., 



1076 CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. 

born on July 4, 1900. died young. Mr. Schroeder is a citizen whom all his 
neighbors respect and esteem because of his many strong and likable qualities, 
and has been successful in his occupation. 



CLARENCE C. IRWIN. 

The subject of this sketch is a native of Pennsylvania and a son of 
Thomas T. and Elizabeth (Alexander) Irwin, the father born in Lycoming 
county, that state, the mother in Mercer county, also in that state. In 
early life Thomas Irwin was a printer by trade, later entered the field of 
journalism, and for some years edited and published the Mercer Whig. 
He was editor and proprietor of the Despatch, published at the same place 
also, but in 1871 discontinued the printing business and came to Clinton 
county, Iowa, and bought two hundred acres of land in Brookfield town- 
ship, which he improved and on which he lived as a successful tiller of 
the soil until his death, in the year 1906, adding forty acres to his place the 
meanwhile, and making it one of the most productive farms and desirabk 
homes in the township. 

Thomas T. Irwin was an influential politician, originally a Whig, 
but when that old historic party had fulfilled its mission and ceased to exist, 
he became an uncompromising Republican. In Pennsylvania he served as 
collector of internal revenue during the administration of Andrew John- 
son, and for a number of years was tax collector, besides filling other 
positions from time to time in both his native state and Iowa. Socially, 
he was a prince of good fellowship, a prime favorite among those with 
whom he mingled, and his death, which occurred in the year 1906, was 
profoundly regretted by all who knew him. His wife died in i860, and of 
his seven children only two survive. 

Clarence C. Irwin was born April 2, 1856, in Mercer county, Penn- 
sylvania, and passed his childhood and youth in the town of Mercer where 
he received his preliminaiy educational discipline. He was about fifteen 
years old when his parents moved to Iowa, and for some time after the 
family settled in Clinton county he attended the public schools, working 
on the farm the meanwhile. Having early manifested a decided inclina- 
tion towards agriculture, he chose the same for his vocation, and while 
still a youth he began farming the home place for himself, being quite sue- 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. IO77 

cessful in the undertaking. During the past thirty years, which he has 
devoted to his chosen calHng. his progress has been steady and continuous, 
and today he occupies a place in the front rank of CHnton county's most 
enterprising agriculturist. He owns a valuable farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres, a short distance south of Elwood. where he resides and on 
which he has made a number of substantial and up-to-date improvements. 
In connection with tilling the soil, he raises considerable live stock, which 
adds very materially to his income. In 1903 he ])ecame interested in the 
Elwood Savings Bank, an institution with which he has since l)een iden- 
tified, and it is eminently proper to attribute to his sound judgment and 
superior executive ability not a little of the success which has marked the 
growth of the business from its inception to the present time. Entering 
the institution in a subordinate capacity, he discharged his duties in such a 
manner as to gain the confidence of the board of directors and stockholders, 
this trust leading, in 1908, to his election to the presidency, which respon- 
sible position he still holds, with credit to himself and to the satisfaction of 
all concerned. In the fall of 1909 he formed a partnership with W. S. 
Hill, with the object in ^•iew of erecting a building in Elwood to be used 
as a garage, an undertaking which was pushed to completion in due time, 
as the substantial structure, thirty by fifty-four feet in dimension, afnd 
equipped throughout with everything calculated to make it answer the 
purpose for which designed, abundantly attests. It is now run by the sub- 
ject, who does a veiy satisfactory business, the garage being greatly ap- 
preciated by automobilists of the town and adjacent country, as well as 
by the traveling public. 

Sufficient has been said in the foregoing lines to indicate Mr. Irwin's 
standing as an enterprising man of affairs and public spirited citizen. For 
a number of years he has put forth every effort at his command to promote 
the material progress of his township and county, and he has not been 
least among those who have labored for the upbuilding of the thriving 
town of Elwood and for the social and moral advancement of the people. 
A Republican, and well grounded in his principles, he has never stood for 
office or pulilic honors of any kind, though ready at all times to work for 
his friends and, if necessary, to make sacrifices for the good of tlie party. 
He has served in various local positions, however, such as township trustee, 
school director, etc., in which he discharged his duties with the same con- 
scientious fidelity which he displays in the management of his private in- 
terests. Personally, he is a most affable gentleman, of pleasing address 



10/8 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

and easily approachable, and possesses the faculty of winning and retaining 
warm friendships. Few men in the county are as widely and favorably 
known, and none occupy in a more marked degree the confidence and 
esteem of the public. 

Mr. Irwin's domestic life began in 1881, when he was united in the 
lx)nds of wedlock with Louisa O'Brien, of Clinton county, the marriage 
being blessed with three children, namely: Edith E., Clyde H. and Leland 
B., all living and affording to their parents many fine hopes for the future. 



LOUIS ITEN. 



At the present time one of the largest and most substantial business indus- 
tries of Clinton is that of the L. Iten & Sons Company, the proprietors of the 
Snow White Bakery, whose products have by their excellence gained a wide 
reputation and a sale in several states. The rapid growth of this business is 
due to the principles upon which it was founded by Louis Iten, which, care- 
fully followed by himself during his lifetime, and by his sons since his death, 
have brought to the company deserved success. 

Louis Iten was born in LTnteragi, canton Zug, Switzerland, in August, 
1838. the son of John Iten, who was born in the same place in 1806. In the 
war of 1830 John Iten was a lieutenant in the French army and a member of 
the Swiss bodyguard of Louis Philippe. In 1850 he came with his family to 
America and located in Milwaukee, where he spent the remainder of his life. 

Louis Iten began his education in his native town and completed it in 
Genesee, Illinois. In 1857 he went to Davenport, Iowa, and engaged in the 
vinegar business with his uncle, with whom he continued until 1863. Then 
he formed a partnership with W. Smith, which continued until 1867, when he 
discontinued his former business to engage in the making of crackers, which 
he followed during the remainder of his life. 

In 1892 Mr. Iten came to Clinton and started the L. Iten & Sons Cracker 
Company of Clinton, in a building forty by one hundred and ninety feet in 
size. In this factory crackers and cookies were made and sold throughout 
this section of the country, the high quality of the goods creating a demand that 
soon taxed the capacity of the little factory. Through all the years this firm 
manufactured crackers and cookies, one feature of the business was ever upper- 
most in the mind of its owner — keep the factory clean. Under ideal condi- 
tions of sanitation and through the use of only the best materials money could 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. lO/Q 

buy, the business of this little factory grew and flourished, until, in 1905. a 
factory measuring one hundred and forty by one hundred and seventy-five 
feet, three stories and a basement, giving a total of about seventy thousand 
square feet of space, was a necessity. A model in factory construction is the 
Snow White baker}'. It is built so that at no time can any other building be 
erected close to it, and this allows ample light and plenty of air at all times. 
The building is surrounded by streets on the north, west and south; to the 
east is the broad Mississippi river, with its constant breezes, and this forms an 
ideal location for a factory manufacturing food products. The prominent 
idea in the construction of this factory was the one which has been ever fore- 
most in the minds of the proprietors since the establishment of the business — 
that is, to insure a system of sanitation which would at all times make it as 
clean and healthful as the most exacting critic could demand, as clean as the 
best housewife keeps her kitchen, and they have obtained this feature at great 
expense. The building is kept constantly ventilated by an enormous fan, 
which forces air through big pipes to all parts of the building, and this air is 
purified before entering the building by passing through an air washer, so that 
it contains no dirt or impurities. The water used is from an artesian well 
one thousand one hundred and eighty feet deep, the most exacting cleanliness 
is required from employes and the machinery is new and cleanly and of the 
latest type. Truly this is a "snow white baker}'.'' 

The products of the Snow W^hite Bakery are no more distinguished by 
their absolute cleanliness, than they are for the class of materials from which 
they are made. The flour, lard, honey, sugar, molasses, chocolate and all 
other constituent materials are of the best value which money can buy. As 
the proprietors of the bakery are glad to allow the public to witness the excep- 
tional conditions under which their products are made, it is open to visitors 
during working hours. 

The above description of the methods and ideals which have animated 
the proprietors of the Snow White Bakeiy, which were firmly laid down and 
consistently worked out by Louis Iten, sufficiently accounts for the phenomenal 
success of the L. Iten & Sons' biscuits and crackers. Mr. Iten was a far- 
seeing man in. all business affairs, and one who recognized that the best way 
to establish a profitable business was to found it upon the rule of giving to his 
customers the best obtainable, and of making that best to be better still, if 
possible. The results justified his sagacity. 

In his fraternal relations Mr. Iten was a member of the Union League 
and of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He was married in 1861 to 
Theresa Zeigler, of Rock Island, Illinois. To this union were born seven 



I080 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

children: John J-. Anna ]\I., Louis C. Lizzie G.. \\'illiam F., Frank J. and 
Sadie M. 

Louis Iten died on September 14. 1906, and his sons, Frank J., Louis C. 
and John J., are now carrying on the operations of the company which he 
estabhshed. 

Louis Iten was a man who took much interest in the affairs of the com- 
munity and was ever ready to assist in whatever promised the betterment of 
the city. Generous and philanthropic, he had many friends among all classes, 
and was loved and respected by his employes, of whom he was always con- 
siderate. His career is an eminent example of success won by an immigrant 
to this country, through his ability and perseverance. 



REV. FR. PETER O'DOWD. 

The mission of service of such great magnitude as has been embraced in 
the career of Rev. Fr. Peter O'Dowd, the able and popular pastor of Peters- 
ville and Assumption churches, the latter being at Charlotte, Clinton county, is 
not vouchsafed to many men. But notwithstanding his popularity among his 
people and the vast amount of good he has accomplished, he is entirely un- 
assuming, content to know that he is doing his Master's will. 

Father O'Dowd was born in county Cavan, Ireland, November i. 1844. 
He came to America when twenty-eight years old. When he was twelve 
years old he was sent to Balla McOue College and was ordained in Ireland. 
He pursued his classical studies in St. Patrick's College in Cavan and studied 
theology at St. John's College, Waterford, and was ordained May 24, 1872. 
He was appointed on a mission to Castle Grove and Monticello, Jones county, 
where he remained until September 8. 1880, when he received his present ap- 
pointment. Father O'Dowd has always been recognized as a man of sound 
judgment and unswerving principles. The beautiful churches he has erected 
in Iowa are lasting monuments to his zeal and executive genius. 

Rev. John J. Len, formerly assistant pastor at Petersville -and Charlotte, 
was born in county Kerry, Ireland, near the Lakes of Killarney in 1876. He 
studied philosophy in St. Patrick's College, Carlon, and theology in All Hal- 
lows College, Dublin. He was ordained June 24, 1903. and received his ap- 
pointment to Petersville and Charlotte the same year. Father Len is a polished 
scholar, writes beautiful English and is an able and logical speaker. His 
future is most promising and he is a perfect Christian gentleman, and it is 



"V: 



I 




REV. FR. PETER ODOW D 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBLIiC LIBKAKY 



ASTOR, LENOI, AilD 
TILMN FOTJNDATTO^^S 
R L ' 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. IO81 

safe to say that none of his predecessors ever endeared himself to a greater 
extent than did Father Len, during the brief period of his pastorate here. 
Recently Father Len was appointed pastor at Sumner, Iowa, being succeeded 
here by Father Thomas O'Dowd. The latter, who is a nephew of Father 
Peter O'Dowd, was a student at St. Joseph's College, Dubuque, studied theol- 
ogy at St. Mary's College, Baltimore, Mar}dand, being ordained at Baltimore 
by Cardinal Gibbons on December 17, 19 10. The mission of Petersville and 
Deep Creek was established at an early day. As early as 1852, Father Kenna 
celebrated mass in the house of Cornelius Spain and from 1853 to 1865 mass 
was regularly offered in a log cabin school house, situated on the north corner 
of the forty -acre lot of the church property in section 30, W'aterford town- 
ship, Clinton county, Iowa. Father Kenna attended this contributory mission 
for six years, walking to and from his charge, or perchance was conveyed by 
the settler with his team of oxen from place to place. It is no wonder that 
Catholicity planted by such resolute hands grew and blossomed and it is no 
wonder today that the children bow in respectful reverence to the old frame 
buildings in whose sanctuary were kindled the first fires of Christian consola- 
tion. Father Kenna died Septemlier- 26, i860, was buried in Mill Creek 
cemetery, a small limestone monument marking the grave of the pioneer priest. 
There were six families in St. Mary's parish at its organization, while today 
it is one of the wealthiest rural parishes in the archdiocese. St. Mary's was 
attended by different pastors of St. Joseph's church, De Witt, during the ad- 
ministration of Father James Scallon ; in 1865 a frame building was erected 
and dedicated to the worship of God which cost over twelve hundred dollars. 
Father J. J. Cadden assumed charge. 

In 1871 and in 1872 Father Eugene O'Kiefe was appointed as pastor. 
Father O'Kiefe built a parsonage the same year and was the first pastor of 
St. Mary's parish, and in 1875 he l)uilt an addition to the churcli. He was 
succeeded by Father John J. Farrell and in 1880 Father Peter O'Dowd was 
put in charge and much of the success of the mission is undoubtedly due to the 
W'ise and energetic course pursued by him. His administration has been a 
signal success. In 1891 a fine parochial school was built, the school being in 
charge of the Franciscan Sisters, who have accomplished much in the way of 
education. The crowning work of Father Dowd's life in Petersville was the 
erection, in 1903, of the splendid new church house at a cost of twenty-five 
thousand dollars, built of pressed brick. Contributions flowed in liberally, the 
active financial operations, combined with the able and painstaking assistance 
of Father J. J. Len, making it easy for the pastor. On November 7, 1904, it 
was dedicated to the worship of God by appropriate ceremonies, the Very Rev. 



I082; CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

Dean E. J. McLaughlin, of Clinton, Iowa, being assisted by a score of prom- 
inent clergy. Solemn high mass was celebrated by the officers, the Very Rev. 
J. J. Garland, celebrant. Rev. T. Smith, deacon, Rev. M. F. Eardley, sub- 
deacon. Rev. J. J. Len, and Rev. J. F. Bowen, master of ceremonies. The 
chanters during -the dedicatoiy sermons were T. F. O'Brien and Rev. J. M. 
Feitz. The Rev. J. F. Nugent, a noted orator from Des Moines, Iowa, 
preached an eloquent and impressive sermon. The ceremony was attended by 
about twenty priests. The church and schools are a success. There are now 
two schools, which are receiving public money and are educating successfully 
a large number of pupils. But few men during a lifetime have done as much 
for struggling humanity and the world as Father Peter O'Dowd, and he has 
deservingly been honored in many ways, and commands the respect of all the 
people, both Catholic and Protestant. 



THOMAS C. O'CONNOR. 

The name of Thomas C. O'Connor will ever stand in the front rank of 
progressive citizens of Clinton county, for he is a man who has ever manifested 
an abiding interest in whatever tended to promote the general good and while 
rd\'ancing his own interests he assists his neighbors along the highway of life, 
establishing a record for upright living and clean citizenship, enjoying the 
esteem of all classes. 

Mr. O'Connor was born at Lyons, this county, November 26. 1854, and 
was reared on a farm. He was educated in the rural schools in the days of 
the old log cabin school house. He is the son of Patrick and Ellen (Dolan) 
O'Connor, both natives of Ireland, from which countiy they came to New 
York when young and there married. Mr. O'Connor was then employed at 
railroad construction work, working westward, after his marriage, on New 
York lines to Galena, Illinois, and crossed the Mississippi river at Lyons, 
Iowa, to work on the old "Calico" railroad, so called as a result of the fact 
that those employed in its construction were compelled to take calico for their 
pay. It was in 185 1 that he came to Iowa, the country then being sparsely 
settled, when wild beasts roamed the prairies and game was plentiful. He is 
still living, being now ninety years of age, hale and hearty. It is interesting 
to hear him relate how he has seen the country grow from its virgin state to 
its present thriving condition. He underwent the usual hardships and de- 
privations of the early settler, but, being brave and not afraid of hard work, 




MR. AND MRS. THOMAS C. O'CONNOR 



^ . 

^ THE NEW YORK 

PUBLrc LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX, Al"' 

TILMN FOUNBATfONS 

R L 



CLINTON county; IOWA. IO83 

he overcame such obstacles as opposed him and played well his part in the 
general development of the county, and no man is worthier of a place in its 
history. He is a strong Democrat, but has never been a public man, preferring 
to be merely a plain, quiet, honest farmer. He has always been a most 
worthy member of the Catholic church. His cabin was often the place of 
worship in the days when Father McKinney, the first missionary priest, visited 
this locality. He was charitable to the afflicted and needy, an excellent neigh- 
bor and true friend, and was well known and highly honored by all. He now 
makes his home at Lost X^ation. He was in the great blizzard of 1856. He 
and his family had started to Lyons with his ox team, the morning being clear 
and pleasant, the storm striking in the afternoon without w arning. Had they 
not taken shelter in a farm house they doubtless would have frozen to death. 
His wife died in igo6. She was the daughter of a very early settler, Mr. 
Dolan ha\ing been prominently identified with the early development of the 
county. His family consisted of ten children. The same number of children 
were also born to Patrick O'Connor and wife, all ni whom died in early life 
liut four, namely: Thomas C. of this review; 3*Iike. who is farming in this 
county; Alary, Mrs. John Connor; Agnes has remained single. 

Thomas C. O'Connor lived under his parental roof until he was thirty- 
two years of age, then married in 1888, soon afterwards renting a farm in 
Berlin township, later moving to \Vaterford township where he rented an- 
other farm and li\ed there ten years, then bought the old Williams farm, \\hich 
he improved. In 1906 he bought the old homestead of his wife's father, 
John Bulger, which contained two hundred and ninet}--five acres. He yet 
holds forty acres of the old ^^'illiams farm, making a good farm of three hun- 
dred and tliirt\-five acres, in \\'aterf()r(l township. He has placed extensive 
and modern improvements on his land and has one of the choice farms of the 
township. 

In politics Mr. O'Connor is a Democrat and served very ably as con- 
stable for ten years and refused to serve longer. ha\ing no aspirations for 
public office, preferring to devote his time exclusively to his general farming 
and stock raising pursuits. He is widely known as a breeder of Belgian 
horses of a very high grade, also handles all kinds of good live stock, and, all 
in all, he is one of the prominent farmers and citizens of Waterford township. 
He was brought up in the Catholic church, from \\ hich faith he has never de- 
parted. 

Mr. O'Connor was married to Mary E. Bulger, who was born on the old 
homestead, where she yet lives, in 1866, the daughter of John and Catherine 
(O'Brian) Bulger, both natives of Ireland, cc^ming to America when young. 



1084 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA, 

and they were married at Barrington, Illinois. Soon afterwards they moved 
to near Fulton, that state, where Mr. O'Connor worked on a farm, later 
bought and improved a good farm, fed and shipped cattle and was a successful 
farmer and stock man. Politically, he was a Democrat and filled several 
minor township offices. He invested in various tracts of land about Char- 
lotte. Clinton county, and became a well known citizen here ; being among 
the early settlers, he helped start the physical and moral development of the 
township. His death occurred in January. 1882. His wife survived and re- 
mained on the old home farm twenty years, then moved to Charlotte, where 
her declining years were spent, dying May 6, 1905. They both belonged to 
the Catholic church. Their children were : Eliza, Mrs. Johnson ; Margaret, 
Mrs. John Reid ; John remained single and is now deceased; Mary E., wife of 
the subject ; Catherine married T. Homes ; Alice married John E. Dunn, of 
New York, he being a lighthouse engineer. 

Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Thomas C. O'Connor: 
John, born August 9, 1889, is still a member of the home circle; Silviries, 
bom June 16, 1893; Burnadate died young; Francis, born Januaiy, 1897; 
Alice, born July 11, 1899; Charles, born May 25, 1907. 

Fraternally Mr. O'Connor is a Woodman and politically a Democrat. 
Mr. O'Connor remembers well the terrible blizzard of January i. 1856, 
though he was only two years old at the time. He was with his father, who 
was on his way to Lyons, when they were overtaken by the terrible storm, and 
as a reminder of the storm he shows the absence of the index finger of his 
right hand. So severely was he affected by the cold that Mrs. Lauderbaugh, 
at whose house he took refuge, thought he was frozen to death. Mr. O'Con- 
nor tells another incident of his boyhood. He and his father found a deer 
eating their crops and they shot and wounded the animal. Instead of run- 
ning awav, he made at his pursuers and gave them a hard chase. The 
father yelled at Tom to get over the fence, which he proceeded to do with 
considerable alacrity. He says he was so scared he could have jumped a 
fourteen-rail fence if necessary. 



OSCAR PERRY CORNISH. 

The subject of this review was born in Oneida county. New York, 
October 15, 1846. and is a son of Charles Henry and Adahne (Clemens) 
Cornish, both natives of the Empire state. The subject's paternal grand- 
parents, Stephen and Millicent (Blodgett) Cornish, were among the early 



CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. I085 

settlers of Oneida county. Concerning the Blodgetts, but little is known. 
Charles Henry Cornish, whose birth occurred in the above county, was by 
occupation a carpenter and blacksmith. He lived in his native state until 
1855, when he moved to Illinois, thence, two years later, came to Clinton 
county, Iowa, where he purchased land and turned his attention to agriculture. 
The farm which he bought in 1863 is in Berlin township and he continued to 
live thereon until his death, which occurred on July 29, 1885. His first wife, 
whose name is given above, died in the latter part of 1848 and subsequently he 
married Euretta Lent, who survived him about sixteen years, departing this 
life September 3, 1902. By the first marriage there was only one child, the 
subject of this sketch ; the second resulted in the birth of three sons and two 
daughters, one of the daughters, Mary, being deceased. 

Oscar Perry Cornish was educated in the district schools of New York 
and Iowa, grew to maturity in close touch with the duties of farm life, and 
in 1864 enlisted in Company F, Forty-fourth Iowa Infantry, with which he 
served until the close of the Civil war. He was but little under seventeen 
when he entered the army, and during the greater part of his period of enlist- 
ment he w^as on reserve service, principally in the state of Tennessee, where 
no active military operations then took place. Receiving an honorable dis- 
charge at the expiration of his term of service, he farmed one year in Clinton 
county, and then went to Du Page county, Illinois, where he learned the trade 
of blacksmithing. After becoming a proficient workman he again returned to 
Clinton county and started a shop in Berlin township, where he remained a 
short time, removing thence to Elwood, where he has since followed his trade 
with marked success, being now the proprietor of a large and well equipped 
establishment, in which all kinds of blacksmithing and certain lines of wood 
work are done. 

As indicated above, Mr. Cornish is a skillful mechanic and since locatinsf 
at Elwood his advancement has been rapid, his shop being the largest and best 
patronized of the kind in the town, and his success has been such that he now 
owns a handsome property and is in easy circumstances. From time to time 
he has been honored with important official positions, including that of justice 
of the peace, in which he has served continuously for over thirty years, and 
for three years he was secretary of the local school board. Politically, he 
wields a strong influence for the Republican party and fraternally holds mem- 
bership with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in which he has held all 
the offices in both subordinate lodge and encampment. He has a firm belief in 
revealed religion and for a number of years has been a zealous and devoted 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church, his wife being indentified with the 
church also and, like himself, active in its various lines of work. 



I086 CLINTON COUNTY, IOWA. 

Mr. Cornish was married in the year 1871 to Mrs. Catherine Sykes (nee 
Dobbler), who has borne him a large family of fifteen children, two of whom 
died in infancy; the names of those living are as follows: Francis Henry, 
William O., George P., Lawrence E., Albert B., Walter B., Julius D., Grace 
F., Floyd P., Gertrude C, Helen H., Ear! M. and Louis M. Additional to 
these there was a child by the mother's previous husband, a son who answers 
to the name of John Sykes. Mr. Cornish and family are greatly respected in the 
town of El wood, and have many warm friends among their large circle of 
acquaintances. He is enterprising and progressive, not only in his business, 
but as a citizen, in that he generously supports every measure for the public 
good, and lends his influence to whatever makes for the moral advancement 
of his fellow men. Those who know him best speak in high terms of his 
many estimable qualities ; qualities of which he makes no boast or parade, being 
a quiet man who attends strictly to his own interests and lets actions, rather 
than words, give publicity to his worth. 



ELIAS S. McCORD, M. D. 

One of the representative members of the medical fraternity in Clinton 
county is Dr. E. S. McCord, of Delmar, whose name has long since become a 
household word to the people of \vestern Clinton county, and he holds high 
rank among the eminent medical men of eastern Iowa, having thoroughly pre- 
pared himself for his chosen calling, pj-acticed conscientiously and kept well 
abreast of the times in all research work and scientific investigation. His 
ability and courtesy have won the undivided confidence and esteem of all who 
know him. He is entirely unassuming, never seeking the praise of his fellow 
men, merely trying to do his full duty at all times as a physician and citizen. 

Doctor McCord vv^as born in Story county, Iowa, January 23, 1868. He 
is the son of Comodore P. and Sarah (Smith) McCord, the father born in 
Ohio and the mother in Illinois. The former was reared on a farm and grew 
to manhood in his native state, later emigrating to Wapello county, Iowa, 
where he met and married Sarah Smith, who had moved there with her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. McCord moved to Story county, Iowa, after their marriage 
and located on a farm there, where they became well established and were in- 
fluential and highly respected. The father died in 1886, at the age of sixty 
years, leaving a widow and nine children. Doctor McCord is the eighth child 
in order of birth of this family. Mrs. Comodore McCord at present lives in 
Nevada, Iowa. 




ELIAS S. McCORD 



i, 



PUBLiL 



-LjI Uil.li-li 1 



ASTOii, li:nox, Ayr 

TILDEN FOUNDAUONS 
B L 



CLINTON COUNTY^ IOWA. IO87 

Comodore McCord was one of the defenders of the Stars and Stripes 
during the great civil strife of the early sixties, having enlisted in Company 
K, Twenty-third Iowa Infantry, in 1862. He had served but three months 
when, at the battle of Black River Bridge, he was shot through the knee with 
a minie ball. He was compelled to have his limb amputated and received an 
honorable discharge on account of disability. He was a member of the Grand 
Army of the Repu